Showing posts tagged as "violence"

Showing posts tagged violence

1 Nov
"The [Syrian] regime deliberately and systematically starves people in a new tactic of modern war."

—from today’s statement on Syria

6 Nov
Two killed in Bahrain ‘terrorist’ explosions, authorities say | Los Angeles Times
By Emily Alpert
Two foreigners were killed and a third injured when a series of explosions rocked Bahrain, government officials said Monday, a new eruption of violence that authorities labeled as terrorist acts bent on destabilizing the divided country.
The three men, all Asians, were victims of homemade bombs, one man dying after kicking a device and another killed near a movie theater, Bahraini police told state media.
The third man, a cleaner, was reported to be in serious condition. Like many Gulf countries, Bahrain brings in a large number of foreign laborers from Asia, including many workers from Pakistan and elsewhere in South Asia.
FULL ARTICLE (Los Angeles Times)
Photo: Zeep van der Kist/Flickr

Two killed in Bahrain ‘terrorist’ explosions, authorities say | Los Angeles Times

By Emily Alpert

Two foreigners were killed and a third injured when a series of explosions rocked Bahrain, government officials said Monday, a new eruption of violence that authorities labeled as terrorist acts bent on destabilizing the divided country.

The three men, all Asians, were victims of homemade bombs, one man dying after kicking a device and another killed near a movie theater, Bahraini police told state media.

The third man, a cleaner, was reported to be in serious condition. Like many Gulf countries, Bahrain brings in a large number of foreign laborers from Asia, including many workers from Pakistan and elsewhere in South Asia.

FULL ARTICLE (Los Angeles Times)

Photo: Zeep van der Kist/Flickr

1 Sep
"It’s a serious issue that will hurt Myanmar’s reputation in the long term… If Myanmar wants to enter the fold of modern and democratic states, it needs to grapple with this very fundamental issue to give equal rights to all ethnic groups, all religious groups."

Jim Della-Giacoma, Southeast Asia project director for Crisis Group

in Bloomberg News: “Myanmar Rape-Murder Sparks Outrage Over Abuse of Muslims" By Flavia Krause-Jackson and Daniel Ten Kate

23 Aug
Papuan Patience Worn Thin | Jakarta Globe
By John Mcbeth
German biologist Pieter Helmut and his wife were walking up the beach after swimming near the Papua provincial capital of Jayapura when a bearded gunman suddenly got out of a van and opened fire. Helmut, 54, had emergency surgery for life-threatening bullet wounds to the stomach and thigh. He was lucky to survive the May 29 attack, unusual even by Papuan standards.
FULL ARTICLE (Jakarta Globe)
Photo: kalki_nasem/Flickr

Papuan Patience Worn Thin | Jakarta Globe

By John Mcbeth

German biologist Pieter Helmut and his wife were walking up the beach after swimming near the Papua provincial capital of Jayapura when a bearded gunman suddenly got out of a van and opened fire. Helmut, 54, had emergency surgery for life-threatening bullet wounds to the stomach and thigh. He was lucky to survive the May 29 attack, unusual even by Papuan standards.

FULL ARTICLE (Jakarta Globe)

Photo: kalki_nasem/Flickr

11 Aug
"The solution has to come from the central government, and the one step it could take that has any hope of halting the downward spiral in an urgent overhaul of security policy"

— from Crisis Group’s report: Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua

10 Aug
INDONESIA: OVERHAUL OF SECURITY CRUCIAL  |  InDepth News
By Jaya Ramachandran 
BRUSSELS (IDN) - A major overhaul of security alone is likely to halt violence in Indonesia’s Papua province in the short term, says the prestigious International Crisis Group in its latest report. Titled Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua, the report scrutinizes multiple sources of conflict in Papua, following fifteen violent incidents in the provincial capital Jayapura in May and June 2012 and others in the central highlands.
FULL ARTICLE (InDepth News)
Photo: World Economic Forum/Wikimedia Commons

INDONESIA: OVERHAUL OF SECURITY CRUCIAL  |  InDepth News

By Jaya Ramachandran 

BRUSSELS (IDN) - A major overhaul of security alone is likely to halt violence in Indonesia’s Papua province in the short term, says the prestigious International Crisis Group in its latest report. Titled Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua, the report scrutinizes multiple sources of conflict in Papua, following fifteen violent incidents in the provincial capital Jayapura in May and June 2012 and others in the central highlands.

FULL ARTICLE (InDepth News)

Photo: World Economic Forum/Wikimedia Commons

"Building better community relations does not mean letting Papuans who engage in criminal violence off the hook, and community policing does not mean avoiding arrests. But gratuitous violence against suspects – beating, kicking, hitting with rifle butts – should end immediately, as should deliberate humiliation, like making participants in the Papuan People’s Congress crawl on their stomachs."

— An excerpt from Crisis Group report on Papua violence in Indonesia

(Source: crisisgroup.org)

9 Aug

"The security apparatus is not the only problem, nor are police and soldiers always the perpetrators of violence; many have been victims as well. But they have come to symbolise everything that has gone wrong with Jakarta’s handling of the Papuan conflict."

-Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua by Crisis Group
Photo: zieak/Flickr

"The security apparatus is not the only problem, nor are police and soldiers always the perpetrators of violence; many have been victims as well. But they have come to symbolise everything that has gone wrong with Jakarta’s handling of the Papuan conflict."

-Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua by Crisis Group

Photo: zieak/Flickr

Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua
Jakarta/Brussels  |   9 Aug 2012
The only measure likely to halt violence in Indonesia’s Papua province in the short term is a major overhaul of security policy.
Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua, the latest report from the International Crisis Group, examines multiple sources of conflict in Papua, following fifteen violent incidents in the provincial capital Jayapura in May and June and others in the central highlands.
“Everything suggests that there is going to be more trouble in Papua unless the government can produce a policy that will have an immediate and visible impact on how ordinary Papuans are treated”, says Cillian Nolan, Crisis Group’s South East Asia Senior Analyst. “Changing how security forces are trained, redesigning incentive structures, penalising excessive use of force, improving accountability and tightening auditing procedures could make a major difference”.
Recent violence has exposed the lack of a coherent government strategy to address the many dimensions of conflict in Papua. Too often well-intentioned programs designed to build trust or produce concrete benefits are undercut by security initiatives to combat separatism or rent-seeking by police or soldiers in resource-rich areas.
The problem is exacerbated by the lack of functioning political institutions. An ineffectual caretaker governor appointed in July 2011 has left the provincial government in limbo, with elections repeatedly postponed as Papuan politicians challenge each other in court. Local government at the sub-provincial level is often even more dysfunctional.
Hopes are fading that a new coordination unit for Papua established in late 2011 – the Unit for Accelerated Development in Papua and West Papua, known by its Indonesian abbreviation UP4B – will be able to make much difference in the short term. The idea of a dialogue on Papua, which seemed to be gaining traction in Jakarta earlier in the year, seems to have foundered as it becomes clear that Papuan groups and Jakarta-based officials have very different interpretations of what the word “dialogue” means. All of this means that the so-called “new deal” for Papua that the government of President Yudhoyono announced in 2007 is a long way from realisation.
“In stressing the need for a change in security policy, Crisis Group is not suggesting that police and soldiers are the only source of violence; many, indeed, have been victims”, says Jim Della-Giacoma, Crisis Group’s South East Asia Project Director. “But if the aim is to improve the political dynamics, the security sector may offer more hope for ‘quick wins’ than economic development projects”.
FULL REPORT

Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua

Jakarta/Brussels  |   9 Aug 2012

The only measure likely to halt violence in Indonesia’s Papua province in the short term is a major overhaul of security policy.

Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua, the latest report from the International Crisis Group, examines multiple sources of conflict in Papua, following fifteen violent incidents in the provincial capital Jayapura in May and June and others in the central highlands.

“Everything suggests that there is going to be more trouble in Papua unless the government can produce a policy that will have an immediate and visible impact on how ordinary Papuans are treated”, says Cillian Nolan, Crisis Group’s South East Asia Senior Analyst. “Changing how security forces are trained, redesigning incentive structures, penalising excessive use of force, improving accountability and tightening auditing procedures could make a major difference”.

Recent violence has exposed the lack of a coherent government strategy to address the many dimensions of conflict in Papua. Too often well-intentioned programs designed to build trust or produce concrete benefits are undercut by security initiatives to combat separatism or rent-seeking by police or soldiers in resource-rich areas.

The problem is exacerbated by the lack of functioning political institutions. An ineffectual caretaker governor appointed in July 2011 has left the provincial government in limbo, with elections repeatedly postponed as Papuan politicians challenge each other in court. Local government at the sub-provincial level is often even more dysfunctional.

Hopes are fading that a new coordination unit for Papua established in late 2011 – the Unit for Accelerated Development in Papua and West Papua, known by its Indonesian abbreviation UP4B – will be able to make much difference in the short term. The idea of a dialogue on Papua, which seemed to be gaining traction in Jakarta earlier in the year, seems to have foundered as it becomes clear that Papuan groups and Jakarta-based officials have very different interpretations of what the word “dialogue” means. All of this means that the so-called “new deal” for Papua that the government of President Yudhoyono announced in 2007 is a long way from realisation.

“In stressing the need for a change in security policy, Crisis Group is not suggesting that police and soldiers are the only source of violence; many, indeed, have been victims”, says Jim Della-Giacoma, Crisis Group’s South East Asia Project Director. “But if the aim is to improve the political dynamics, the security sector may offer more hope for ‘quick wins’ than economic development projects”.

FULL REPORT

10 Jul
Has Timor-Leste left behind its violent past?
By JIM DELLA-GIACOMA
Timor-Leste seems to have passed the test. With last Saturday’s parliamentary poll, it has now held three elections this year without significant violence. This will allow for the withdrawal of a UN peacekeeping mission whose 1,100-strong police component has long seemed out of synch with local realities. Its violent recent past may increasingly look like history, although the poor country that celebrated only the 10th anniversary of the restoration of its independence in May still faces numerous challenges.
FULL POST (Crisis Group Blogs)
Photo: UN Photo/Martine Perret

Has Timor-Leste left behind its violent past?

By JIM DELLA-GIACOMA

Timor-Leste seems to have passed the test. With last Saturday’s parliamentary poll, it has now held three elections this year without significant violence. This will allow for the withdrawal of a UN peacekeeping mission whose 1,100-strong police component has long seemed out of synch with local realities. Its violent recent past may increasingly look like history, although the poor country that celebrated only the 10th anniversary of the restoration of its independence in May still faces numerous challenges.

FULL POST (Crisis Group Blogs)

Photo: UN Photo/Martine Perret