Showing posts tagged as "tripoli"

Showing posts tagged tripoli

15 Sep
Dozens killed in Tripoli suburb under siege | Tom Stevenson
On the outskirts of Libya’s capital, Tripoli, the residents of an area known as Warshefana are surrounded on all sides by armed militias who, in addition to attacking built-up areas, have imposed what amounts to a siege, blocking the entry of food and medicine.
The fighters form part of a militia coalition that took effective control of Tripoli two weeks ago. They have been heavily shelling Warshefana from their surrounding positions for the last week and have so far killed more than 70 residents, including at least 12 children. An additional 140 are believed to be injured.
The Warshefana are a tribe often seen as having been loyalists to Moammar Gadhafi’s regime. They once supported militias from Zintan, including Othman Mlekta’s al-Qaqaa, in their long battle in Tripoli against allies of their attackers. The militias now besieging the tribe see its members as traitors to Libya’s revolution, which they claim to be upholding.
FULL ARTICLE (Al-Monitor)
Photo: European Commission DG ECHO/flickr

Dozens killed in Tripoli suburb under siege | Tom Stevenson

On the outskirts of Libya’s capital, Tripoli, the residents of an area known as Warshefana are surrounded on all sides by armed militias who, in addition to attacking built-up areas, have imposed what amounts to a siege, blocking the entry of food and medicine.

The fighters form part of a militia coalition that took effective control of Tripoli two weeks ago. They have been heavily shelling Warshefana from their surrounding positions for the last week and have so far killed more than 70 residents, including at least 12 children. An additional 140 are believed to be injured.

The Warshefana are a tribe often seen as having been loyalists to Moammar Gadhafi’s regime. They once supported militias from Zintan, including Othman Mlekta’s al-Qaqaa, in their long battle in Tripoli against allies of their attackers. The militias now besieging the tribe see its members as traitors to Libya’s revolution, which they claim to be upholding.

FULL ARTICLE (Al-Monitor)

Photo: European Commission DG ECHO/flickr

29 Jul
Still Torn by Factional Fighting, Post-Revolt Libya Is Coming Undone | Kareem Fahim
CAIRO — For weeks, rival Libyan militias had been pounding one another’s positions with artillery, mortar rounds and rockets in a desperate fight to control the international airport in the capital, Tripoli. Then suddenly, early Saturday morning, the fighting just stopped.
The pause came as United States military warplanes circled overhead, providing air cover for a predawn evacuation of the American Embassy’s staff. Apparently fearing the planes, the militias held their fire just long enough for the ambassador and her staff to reach the Tunisian border — a reminder to Libyans of how even their most powerful allies were incapable of putting out their incendiary feuds.
FULL ARTICLE (The New York Times)
Photo: Kadir Aksoy/flickr

Still Torn by Factional Fighting, Post-Revolt Libya Is Coming Undone | Kareem Fahim

CAIRO — For weeks, rival Libyan militias had been pounding one another’s positions with artillery, mortar rounds and rockets in a desperate fight to control the international airport in the capital, Tripoli. Then suddenly, early Saturday morning, the fighting just stopped.

The pause came as United States military warplanes circled overhead, providing air cover for a predawn evacuation of the American Embassy’s staff. Apparently fearing the planes, the militias held their fire just long enough for the ambassador and her staff to reach the Tunisian border — a reminder to Libyans of how even their most powerful allies were incapable of putting out their incendiary feuds.

FULL ARTICLE (The New York Times)

Photo: Kadir Aksoy/flickr

18 Nov
Libyan PM urges militias to leave Tripoli after violence erupts | Borzou Daragahi
Libya’s embattled prime minister Ali Zidane on Saturday called on all armed groups other than the uniformed police and army to leave the capital a day after self-described revolutionary brigades opened fire on mostly unarmed protesters, leaving at least 43 people dead and 400 injured.
Fresh clashes between rival militia groups from the capital, Tripoli, those with roots in Libya’s number three city of Misurata broke out in the city, leaving at least one dead. The Libyan capital appeared close to the brink of a complete breakdown in security amid reports that militias from Misurata had shelled the eastern Tripoli suburb of Tajoura, plundered an army base there and made off with weapons and ammunition.
FULL ARTICLE (Financial Times) 
Photo: Matchbox Media Collective/Flickr

Libyan PM urges militias to leave Tripoli after violence erupts | Borzou Daragahi

Libya’s embattled prime minister Ali Zidane on Saturday called on all armed groups other than the uniformed police and army to leave the capital a day after self-described revolutionary brigades opened fire on mostly unarmed protesters, leaving at least 43 people dead and 400 injured.

Fresh clashes between rival militia groups from the capital, Tripoli, those with roots in Libya’s number three city of Misurata broke out in the city, leaving at least one dead. The Libyan capital appeared close to the brink of a complete breakdown in security amid reports that militias from Misurata had shelled the eastern Tripoli suburb of Tajoura, plundered an army base there and made off with weapons and ammunition.

FULL ARTICLE (Financial Times) 

Photo: Matchbox Media Collective/Flickr

27 Aug
"We all knew there were Salafists groups in Libya and we thought they were marginal and that the government would be able to control them… .What we’re seeing now is a problem in the chain of command in the security forces. You have official security forces under the authority of the government not responding to the orders of the deputy prime minister who called for the defence of these sites."

Claudia Gazzini, Crisis Group Senior Analyst in Libya in Damage to Libya shrines prompts crisis in the Financial Times by Borzou Daragahi in Cairo

FULL ARTICLE (FT)

25 Jun
Analysis: Bound by conflict, the Syrian-Lebanon crisis | IRIN News
For more than a generation, the northern Lebanese town of Tripoli has been a divided city, home to most of Lebanon’s Shia Alawi community, but also a stronghold of Sunni conservatism. 
The two sects, in their respective neighbourhoods of Jebel Mohsen and Bab al-Tabbaneh, have been at odds since the outbreak of the Lebanese Civil War in 1975, with hundreds dying in the worst bloodshed in 1986. The road separating the two entrenched factions - appropriately called Syria Street - is the only demarcation line that still exists in Lebanon 22 years after the war ended.
In recent months, the outbreak of conflict in Syria and the influx of thousands of Syrian refugees into Lebanon has renewed and increased those tensions between Shia Alawis generally supportive of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and Sunni sympathizers of the rebel Free Syrian Army (FSA) and the opposition. 
More than 30 Lebanese from both sides have been killed in fighting between the two communities since the beginning of the Syrian uprising in March 2011. While a fragile ceasefire in Tripoli - agreed in early June - seems to be generally holding, sporadic clashes happen on a daily basis and it is common to see civilians carrying weapons.
FULL ARTICLE (IRIN)

Photo: Anja Pietsch/ IRIN

Analysis: Bound by conflict, the Syrian-Lebanon crisis | IRIN News

For more than a generation, the northern Lebanese town of Tripoli has been a divided city, home to most of Lebanon’s Shia Alawi community, but also a stronghold of Sunni conservatism. 

The two sects, in their respective neighbourhoods of Jebel Mohsen and Bab al-Tabbaneh, have been at odds since the outbreak of the Lebanese Civil War in 1975, with hundreds dying in the worst bloodshed in 1986. The road separating the two entrenched factions - appropriately called Syria Street - is the only demarcation line that still exists in Lebanon 22 years after the war ended.

In recent months, the outbreak of conflict in Syria and the influx of thousands of Syrian refugees into Lebanon has renewed and increased those tensions between Shia Alawis generally supportive of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and Sunni sympathizers of the rebel Free Syrian Army (FSA) and the opposition. 

More than 30 Lebanese from both sides have been killed in fighting between the two communities since the beginning of the Syrian uprising in March 2011. While a fragile ceasefire in Tripoli - agreed in early June - seems to be generally holding, sporadic clashes happen on a daily basis and it is common to see civilians carrying weapons.

FULL ARTICLE (IRIN)

Photo: Anja Pietsch/ IRIN

23 May
Syria Violence Shakes Lebanon’s Fragile Stability | Reuters
By Dominic Evans
Fragile Lebanon’s sectarian tensions, which festered for two decades since the end of its ruinous civil war, have been re-ignited by the turmoil in powerful neighbor Syria and threaten to plunge the country into a sustained period of unrest.
In the northern city of Tripoli, where Sunni Muslims strongly support the 14-month uprising against Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad, nine people were killed in clashes last week triggered by the arrest of an anti-Assad activist.
The violence spread to the capital on Monday when Sunni gunmen fought street battles in a Beirut neighborhood following the killing of a Sunni cleric, also opposed to Assad, by Lebanese soldiers at an army checkpoint in the northern Akkar province.
On Tuesday, angry Shi’ites blocked roads in southern Beirut in protest against the abduction in northern Syria of a dozen Lebanese Shi’ites by rebels from the overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim insurgency against Assad.
"We are entering a phase of protracted instability in Lebanon. There is no direct way in which these events will be fully contained," said Eurasia Group analyst Ayham Kamel.
The Syrian uprising forced Lebanon’s Prime Minister Najib Mikati into a near-impossible balancing act between diehard supporters and opponents of Assad in a country which was long dominated by Syrian military power.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: Xansas/Flickr

Syria Violence Shakes Lebanon’s Fragile Stability | Reuters

By Dominic Evans

Fragile Lebanon’s sectarian tensions, which festered for two decades since the end of its ruinous civil war, have been re-ignited by the turmoil in powerful neighbor Syria and threaten to plunge the country into a sustained period of unrest.

In the northern city of Tripoli, where Sunni Muslims strongly support the 14-month uprising against Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad, nine people were killed in clashes last week triggered by the arrest of an anti-Assad activist.

The violence spread to the capital on Monday when Sunni gunmen fought street battles in a Beirut neighborhood following the killing of a Sunni cleric, also opposed to Assad, by Lebanese soldiers at an army checkpoint in the northern Akkar province.

On Tuesday, angry Shi’ites blocked roads in southern Beirut in protest against the abduction in northern Syria of a dozen Lebanese Shi’ites by rebels from the overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim insurgency against Assad.

"We are entering a phase of protracted instability in Lebanon. There is no direct way in which these events will be fully contained," said Eurasia Group analyst Ayham Kamel.

The Syrian uprising forced Lebanon’s Prime Minister Najib Mikati into a near-impossible balancing act between diehard supporters and opponents of Assad in a country which was long dominated by Syrian military power.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: Xansas/Flickr

9 May
AFP | Libya govt starts to get tough on road to democracy  
TRIPOLI — The tendency to resort to the arms which ousted Moamer Kadhafi poses a roadblock to democracy in the new Libya, analysts warn, while recognising the government’s growing capacity to defuse crises.
Libyan authorities resorted to force on Tuesday for the first time to repel dozens of armed men who had laid siege to Prime Minister Abdel Rahim al-Kib’s offices to demand stipends and medical treatment for the war wounded.
"It is not just rogue elements but a pernicious logic that prevails across the country," Middle East specialist Karim Bitar told AFP, warning that Libya risks becoming swept by instability spreading across the Sahel region.
"The situation is very worrying," he said in reference to the latest attack on the government that left one dead and four people wounded.
Libya’s new rulers face almost daily protests from armed ex-fighters who want financial and other benefits in recognition of their role in toppling the regime of slain leader Kadhafi in 2011.
The government has counted on dialogue with demonstrators, only to be cowed into signing checks by former rebels flaunting their firepower or blocking access to oil companies and institutions.
"The government will not be able to hold on for long if it keeps yielding to blackmail and buying the allegiance of militias with hard cash," Bitar said.
In televised remarks late Tuesday, Kib adopted a tough tone, vowing that his government would “not negotiate under the threat of arms” and warning of the use of force if necessary.
Tripoli High Security Committee head Khaled Besher said 14 assailants were arrested following the worst attack in Tripoli against Libya’s new rulers.
How the government deals with militias, made up of former rebels who fought against Kadhafi’s regime, could make or break Libya’s transition to democracy, analysts say.
"People are not going to let go of their arms unless they feel that they are part of the political process," said an Arab pro-democracy activist in Tripoli, while warning that hurried elections could pave the way for more violence.
Strengthening state institutions, tackling rogue militias and dealing fairly with former supporters of Kadhafi’s regime are steps the interim authorities must take to bring about normalisation, he said.
"With all the problems, the Libyan leadership has succeeded to a large extent in defusing the tensions," said the activist, asking not to be named.
Peter Cole of the International Crisis Group praises the government’s handling of the latest crisis, noting the security forces used to intervene had been handpicked by the interior ministry.
FULL ARTICLE (AFP)

AFP | Libya govt starts to get tough on road to democracy  

TRIPOLI — The tendency to resort to the arms which ousted Moamer Kadhafi poses a roadblock to democracy in the new Libya, analysts warn, while recognising the government’s growing capacity to defuse crises.

Libyan authorities resorted to force on Tuesday for the first time to repel dozens of armed men who had laid siege to Prime Minister Abdel Rahim al-Kib’s offices to demand stipends and medical treatment for the war wounded.

"It is not just rogue elements but a pernicious logic that prevails across the country," Middle East specialist Karim Bitar told AFP, warning that Libya risks becoming swept by instability spreading across the Sahel region.

"The situation is very worrying," he said in reference to the latest attack on the government that left one dead and four people wounded.

Libya’s new rulers face almost daily protests from armed ex-fighters who want financial and other benefits in recognition of their role in toppling the regime of slain leader Kadhafi in 2011.

The government has counted on dialogue with demonstrators, only to be cowed into signing checks by former rebels flaunting their firepower or blocking access to oil companies and institutions.

"The government will not be able to hold on for long if it keeps yielding to blackmail and buying the allegiance of militias with hard cash," Bitar said.

In televised remarks late Tuesday, Kib adopted a tough tone, vowing that his government would “not negotiate under the threat of arms” and warning of the use of force if necessary.

Tripoli High Security Committee head Khaled Besher said 14 assailants were arrested following the worst attack in Tripoli against Libya’s new rulers.

How the government deals with militias, made up of former rebels who fought against Kadhafi’s regime, could make or break Libya’s transition to democracy, analysts say.

"People are not going to let go of their arms unless they feel that they are part of the political process," said an Arab pro-democracy activist in Tripoli, while warning that hurried elections could pave the way for more violence.

Strengthening state institutions, tackling rogue militias and dealing fairly with former supporters of Kadhafi’s regime are steps the interim authorities must take to bring about normalisation, he said.

"With all the problems, the Libyan leadership has succeeded to a large extent in defusing the tensions," said the activist, asking not to be named.

Peter Cole of the International Crisis Group praises the government’s handling of the latest crisis, noting the security forces used to intervene had been handpicked by the interior ministry.

FULL ARTICLE (AFP)