Showing posts tagged as "tajikistan"

Showing posts tagged tajikistan

12 Sep
Central Asia’s intensifying water dispute | Gabriel Domínguez
A new report finds political rivalries, economic competition and nationalism are hampering efforts to solve Central Asia’s growing water and energy needs; a situation that may lead to conflict says analyst Deirdre Tynan.
Water management in Central Asia has long been a controversial issue. It is a region where major rivers cross international borders and water and energy production are closely intertwined. In 2012, a dispute over water resources risked provoking military conflict among the former Soviet republics, due to plans by Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan to dam rivers for hydropower projects. Uzbekistan, Central Asia’s most populous country, depends on the rivers that rise in these neighboring countries to irrigate farmland and it has long been opposed to plans to revive Soviet-era projects to build dams upstream.
In a recently released report, the International Crisis Group (ICG) says that political rivalries, nationalism and mistrust have also been increasing tensions. The paper titled Water Pressures in Central Asia, examines the impact of water issues on shared border areas in the volatile Ferghana Valley; water shortages in urban areas; and competing water and energy needs among the three riparian states.
FULL ARTICLE (Deutsche Welle)
Photo: Matluba Mukhamedova/World Bank/flickr

Central Asia’s intensifying water dispute | Gabriel Domínguez

A new report finds political rivalries, economic competition and nationalism are hampering efforts to solve Central Asia’s growing water and energy needs; a situation that may lead to conflict says analyst Deirdre Tynan.

Water management in Central Asia has long been a controversial issue. It is a region where major rivers cross international borders and water and energy production are closely intertwined. In 2012, a dispute over water resources risked provoking military conflict among the former Soviet republics, due to plans by Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan to dam rivers for hydropower projects. Uzbekistan, Central Asia’s most populous country, depends on the rivers that rise in these neighboring countries to irrigate farmland and it has long been opposed to plans to revive Soviet-era projects to build dams upstream.

In a recently released report, the International Crisis Group (ICG) says that political rivalries, nationalism and mistrust have also been increasing tensions. The paper titled Water Pressures in Central Asia, examines the impact of water issues on shared border areas in the volatile Ferghana Valley; water shortages in urban areas; and competing water and energy needs among the three riparian states.

FULL ARTICLE (Deutsche Welle)

Photo: Matluba Mukhamedova/World Bank/flickr

11 Sep
Water Pressures in Central Asia
Bishkek/Brussels  |   11 Sep 2014
Growing tensions in the Ferghana Valley are exacerbated by disputes over shared water resources. To address this, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan urgently need to step back from using water or energy as a coercive tool and focus on reaching a series of modest, bilateral agreements, pending comprehensive resolution of this serious problem.
Political rivalries, economic competition, heightened nationalism and mistrust hamper the search for a solution to the region’s growing water and energy needs. In its latest report, Water Pressures in Central Asia, the International Crisis Group examines the impact of water issues on shared border areas in the volatile Ferghana Valley; water shortages in urban areas; and competing water and energy needs among the three riparian states of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. The report also analyses the international community’s potential to contribute to national and regional stability in Central Asia.
The report’s major findings and recommendations are:
Kyrgyzstan is looking at a bleak winter of energy shortages because of low water levels at the Toktogul reservoir and hydropower plant. Energy insecurity and resentment are growing and have proved to be major catalysts in the downfall of successive Kyrgyz administrations. Only mass labour migration and authoritarian tactics have prevented similar upheavals in Uzbekistan and Tajikistan.
Attempts at comprehensive regional solutions have foundered on mistrust. The three countries (and international backers) should act in the Ferghana Valley border areas to end annual competition and conflict over water by seeking step-by-step solutions rather than an all-inclusive resource settlement. If Uzbekistan will not join, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan should work bilaterally.
Uzbekistan’s irrigation system desperately needs modernisation. Researchers suggest that 50 to 80 per cent of water used for agricultural irrigation is lost.
The failure in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan to provide basic services greatly increases the perception that their governments are weak and corrupt and provides a rallying point for opposition movements that seek to oust them.
The donor community, including China, the EU and Russia, should support the region in modernising its water infrastructure, building in effective anti-corruption measures and focusing on direct impact at community levels.
“Corruption, hidden interests and inflexible positions in all three states hinder a mutually acceptable solution. A common development strategy focusing on reform of agricultural and energy sectors would be in their interest”, says Deirdre Tynan, Central Asia Project Director, “but such an initiative requires a radical shift in the way regional leaders think”.
“The failure of Bishkek, Dushanbe and Tashkent to resolve cross-border water problems shows a worrying disregard for stability in their common area. Strained ethnic relations and competition over water and land could be a deadly mix. Conflict in this volatile part of Central Asia risks rapid, possibly irreversible regional destabilisation”, says Paul Quinn-Judge, Europe and Central Asia Program Director.
FULL REPORT

Water Pressures in Central Asia

Bishkek/Brussels  |   11 Sep 2014

Growing tensions in the Ferghana Valley are exacerbated by disputes over shared water resources. To address this, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan urgently need to step back from using water or energy as a coercive tool and focus on reaching a series of modest, bilateral agreements, pending comprehensive resolution of this serious problem.

Political rivalries, economic competition, heightened nationalism and mistrust hamper the search for a solution to the region’s growing water and energy needs. In its latest report, Water Pressures in Central Asia, the International Crisis Group examines the impact of water issues on shared border areas in the volatile Ferghana Valley; water shortages in urban areas; and competing water and energy needs among the three riparian states of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. The report also analyses the international community’s potential to contribute to national and regional stability in Central Asia.

The report’s major findings and recommendations are:

  • Kyrgyzstan is looking at a bleak winter of energy shortages because of low water levels at the Toktogul reservoir and hydropower plant. Energy insecurity and resentment are growing and have proved to be major catalysts in the downfall of successive Kyrgyz administrations. Only mass labour migration and authoritarian tactics have prevented similar upheavals in Uzbekistan and Tajikistan.
  • Attempts at comprehensive regional solutions have foundered on mistrust. The three countries (and international backers) should act in the Ferghana Valley border areas to end annual competition and conflict over water by seeking step-by-step solutions rather than an all-inclusive resource settlement. If Uzbekistan will not join, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan should work bilaterally.
  • Uzbekistan’s irrigation system desperately needs modernisation. Researchers suggest that 50 to 80 per cent of water used for agricultural irrigation is lost.
  • The failure in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan to provide basic services greatly increases the perception that their governments are weak and corrupt and provides a rallying point for opposition movements that seek to oust them.
  • The donor community, including China, the EU and Russia, should support the region in modernising its water infrastructure, building in effective anti-corruption measures and focusing on direct impact at community levels.

“Corruption, hidden interests and inflexible positions in all three states hinder a mutually acceptable solution. A common development strategy focusing on reform of agricultural and energy sectors would be in their interest”, says Deirdre Tynan, Central Asia Project Director, “but such an initiative requires a radical shift in the way regional leaders think”.

“The failure of Bishkek, Dushanbe and Tashkent to resolve cross-border water problems shows a worrying disregard for stability in their common area. Strained ethnic relations and competition over water and land could be a deadly mix. Conflict in this volatile part of Central Asia risks rapid, possibly irreversible regional destabilisation”, says Paul Quinn-Judge, Europe and Central Asia Program Director.

FULL REPORT

3 Feb
Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

10 Oct
Russia Keeps Tajik Base, Risking Taliban Face-Off | RIA Novosti 
By Alexey Eremenko
Russia won a 30-year deal on a military base in Tajikistan, but the price includes risk of placing Russian servicemen under fire if violence flares up in volatile Central Asia.
Moscow and Dushanbe clinched an agreement on Friday on a Russian military base in Tajikistan, which will remain in the country until at least 2042, a Russian presidential aide said.
FULL ARTICLE (RIA Novosti)
Photo: Presidential Press and Information Office/Wikimedia Commons 

Russia Keeps Tajik Base, Risking Taliban Face-Off | RIA Novosti 

By Alexey Eremenko

Russia won a 30-year deal on a military base in Tajikistan, but the price includes risk of placing Russian servicemen under fire if violence flares up in volatile Central Asia.

Moscow and Dushanbe clinched an agreement on Friday on a Russian military base in Tajikistan, which will remain in the country until at least 2042, a Russian presidential aide said.

FULL ARTICLE (RIA Novosti)

Photo: Presidential Press and Information Office/Wikimedia Commons 

25 Aug
Global Insider: Insecurity Rises in Tajikistan as State’s Grip Weakens | World Politics Review
By The Editors
Tolib Ayembekov, a warlord formerly based in eastern Tajikistan, gave himself up earlier this month following a major military offensive by Tajik authorities. In an email interview, Paul Quinn-Judge, deputy director of the International Crisis Group’s Asia Program, discussed Tajikistan’s security situation.
FULL ARTICLE (WPR)
Photo: babasteve/Flickr

Global Insider: Insecurity Rises in Tajikistan as State’s Grip Weakens | World Politics Review

By The Editors

Tolib Ayembekov, a warlord formerly based in eastern Tajikistan, gave himself up earlier this month following a major military offensive by Tajik authorities. In an email interview, Paul Quinn-Judge, deputy director of the International Crisis Group’s Asia Program, discussed Tajikistan’s security situation.

FULL ARTICLE (WPR)

Photo: babasteve/Flickr

5 Aug

CrisisWatch N°108, 2 August 2012

This month’s podcast reviews developments for the month of July, highlighting deteriorated situations in India, Madagascar, Mali, Syria and Tajikistan.

1 Aug

CrisisWatch N°108

Tajikistan saw fighting erupt around Khorog – the regional capital of the autonomous province of Gorno Badakhshan – following the killing of the regional head of the State Committee for National Security (GKNB) General Abdullo Nazarov. The government quickly blamed the murder on fighters loyal to former opposition fighter and Ishkoshim District border-guard chief Tolib Ayombekov, imposing a media-blackout and launching a large-scale security operation which has reportedly caused scores of fatalities, including civilians.

In Syria, fierce fighting spread to the centres of Aleppo and Damascus for the first time since the beginning of the uprising, prompting government airstrikes and forcing thousands to flee to neighbouring countries. Rebels also extended their control over many rural areas, including several crossings on the Iraqi and Turkish borders. The Assad regime suffered the high-profile assassination of 4 senior security officials in Damascus, in addition to a number of increasingly high-profile defections.

The transition remained stalled in Mali, despite the return of interim President Traoré and the announcement of new transitional institutions. Prime Minister Modibo Diarra refused to resign and the military junta continues to interfere in the government’s internal affairs. Meanwhile, with the threat of foreign military intervention looming, Islamist hardliners consolidated their grip over the country’s north, ousting Tuareg rebels from their last stronghold in the region.

Political tensions intensified in Madagascar following the failure of bitter rivals President Rajoelina and former president Ravalomanana to resolve outstanding issues in the elections roadmap ahead of the Southern African Development Community’s 31 July deadline. A failed mutiny by disgruntled soldiers on the outskirts of Antananarivo demonstrated the growing impatience of many with the political process. It appears increasingly likely that elections scheduled for November will be delayed.

In India, the north-eastern state of Assam saw renewed bouts of ethnic violence, ending nearly three years of relative calm. Clashes broke out after four Bodo youths were killed, provoking retaliation against neighboring Muslim communities and igniting a spiral of violence which has so far claimed the lives of some 60 people.

CrisisWatch

26 Jul
Explainer: Violence in Tajikistan’s Badakhshan Province a Legacy of the Civil War | Radio Free Europe Radio Liberty
Government forces have recently clashed with armed groups in Tajikistan’s remote Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Province, a mountainous region along the Afghan border that has existed largely outside Dushanbe’s control for decades. RFE/RL’s Robert Coalson takes a quick look at Badakhshan and the wider impact of unrest there.
FULL ARTICLE (Radio Free Europe Radio Liberty)
Photo: sugarmelon.com/ Flickr

Explainer: Violence in Tajikistan’s Badakhshan Province a Legacy of the Civil War | Radio Free Europe Radio Liberty

Government forces have recently clashed with armed groups in Tajikistan’s remote Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Province, a mountainous region along the Afghan border that has existed largely outside Dushanbe’s control for decades. RFE/RL’s Robert Coalson takes a quick look at Badakhshan and the wider impact of unrest there.

FULL ARTICLE (Radio Free Europe Radio Liberty)

Photo: sugarmelon.com/ Flickr

(Source: )

8 Jun
International Crisis Group

Central Asia: Region in Decline

Central Asia: Region in Decline | International Crisis Group

6 June 2012: Paul Quinn-Judge, Crisis Group’s Deputy Asia Director, discusses the deep crisis facing the Central Asian states of Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan and analyzes the region’s relationship with neighboring powers Russia and China. 9:24

Photo: babasteve/Flickr

30 plays
Album Art
5 Jan
Louise Arbour, president and CEO of the International Crisis Group writes in Foreign Policy that Central Asia may be in a list of "Next Year’s Wars." Tajikistan faces both local and external insurgencies with little ability to cope with them, and relations with neighboring Uzbekistan have deteriorated over water and transport disputes, punctuated by occasional deadly border incidents, notes The Bug Pit.
Added to the risk of conflict is the presence of the Uzbek ethnic minority in another neighbor, Kyrgyzstan, already the scene of ethnic clashes in 2010, killing more than 400 people and wounding thousands. The Tajik independent news service Asia Plus says Uzbekistan is building up its tanks on the Tajik border near the enclave of Sughd, following a shoot-out where one border guard was recently killed. This sort of skirmish has become common in recent years along Uzbekistan’s borders. Tashkent has escalated its ongoing conflicts with Tajikistan by halting gas deliveries this week after a contract lapsed and the countries failed to find an agreement on prices, Asia Plus reported.
Arbour identifies Uzbekistan’s close relationship with the US as another factor in predicting possible conflict, evidently because the US is now dependent on Uzbekistan for a large percent of the transit of supplies to NATO troops in Afghanistan. “Washington increasingly relies on Tashkent for logistics in Afghanistan, but the brutal nature of the regime means it is not only an embarrassing partner but also, ultimately, a very unreliable one,” says Arbour.
FULL ARTICLE (EurasiaNet)
Photo: Afghanistan Ministry of Transportation and Civil Aviation

Louise Arbour, president and CEO of the International Crisis Group writes in Foreign Policy that Central Asia may be in a list of "Next Year’s Wars." Tajikistan faces both local and external insurgencies with little ability to cope with them, and relations with neighboring Uzbekistan have deteriorated over water and transport disputes, punctuated by occasional deadly border incidents, notes The Bug Pit.

Added to the risk of conflict is the presence of the Uzbek ethnic minority in another neighbor, Kyrgyzstan, already the scene of ethnic clashes in 2010, killing more than 400 people and wounding thousands. The Tajik independent news service Asia Plus says Uzbekistan is building up its tanks on the Tajik border near the enclave of Sughd, following a shoot-out where one border guard was recently killed. This sort of skirmish has become common in recent years along Uzbekistan’s borders. Tashkent has escalated its ongoing conflicts with Tajikistan by halting gas deliveries this week after a contract lapsed and the countries failed to find an agreement on prices, Asia Plus reported.

Arbour identifies Uzbekistan’s close relationship with the US as another factor in predicting possible conflict, evidently because the US is now dependent on Uzbekistan for a large percent of the transit of supplies to NATO troops in Afghanistan. “Washington increasingly relies on Tashkent for logistics in Afghanistan, but the brutal nature of the regime means it is not only an embarrassing partner but also, ultimately, a very unreliable one,” says Arbour.

FULL ARTICLE (EurasiaNet)

Photo: Afghanistan Ministry of Transportation and Civil Aviation