Showing posts tagged as "sidney jones"

Showing posts tagged sidney jones

12 Jul
Myanmar Muslim leaders in talks to get fighters and weapons | ABC Radio Australia
A post on the radical Islamic website Ar Rahmah Media Network claims that leaders from Myanmar’s ethnic Rohingya community have been in Indonesia for talks with hardline groups about recruiting fighters and weapon supplies.
FULL STORY (ABC Radio Australia) 
Photo: Evangelos Petratos (European Commission DG ECHO)/Flickr

Myanmar Muslim leaders in talks to get fighters and weapons | ABC Radio Australia

A post on the radical Islamic website Ar Rahmah Media Network claims that leaders from Myanmar’s ethnic Rohingya community have been in Indonesia for talks with hardline groups about recruiting fighters and weapon supplies.

FULL STORY (ABC Radio Australia) 

Photo: Evangelos Petratos (European Commission DG ECHO)/Flickr

7 May
Indonesia: Tensions over Aceh’s Flag
Jakarta/Brussels  |   7 May 2013
A dispute over a flag in Aceh is testing the limits of autonomy, irritating Indonesia’s central government, heightening ethnic tensions, reviving a campaign for the division of the province and raising fears of violence as the 2014 national elections approach.
Indonesia: Tensions over Aceh’s Flag, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group, examines the political fallout from the Aceh provincial legislature’s adoption of a regulation on 25 March making the banner of the former rebel Free Aceh Movement (Gerakan Aceh Merdeka, GAM) the province’s official flag. The central government says the regulation violates a law banning separatist symbols and must be changed. Partai Aceh, the political party set up by the former rebels, says the flag cannot be separatist since GAM leaders signed a 2005 peace agreement with the Indonesian government in Helsinki in which it acknowledged Indonesian sovereignty.
The briefing’s major findings and recommendations are:
Partai Aceh sees no need to compromise because its leaders believe Jakarta will capitulate, as it has in the past. It also wants to use the enormous emotive power of the flag to mobilise voters in 2014.
Either way, Partai Aceh wins. If Jakarta rejects the flag, the party can score points with its supporters, because defying the central government is a vote-getter. If it accepts the flag, Partai Aceh will be convinced that obstinacy pays, and its leaders are likely to press for more authority.
Partai Aceh is systematically entrenching its control over political institutions in the province, making it less likely that any democratic challenge to its control will succeed. It already controls the executive and legislative branches in the provincial government, as well as most of the most populous districts. It is exerting influence over the civil service and local election commission. It is also in control of a new bureaucracy set up to safeguard Acehnese culture and values, known as the WaliNanggroe (Guardian of the State).
“This dispute is about much more than whether the flag constitutes a separatist symbol. It is about where Aceh is headed and what its relations with Jakarta will be”, says Sidney Jones, Crisis Group’s Senior Asia Adviser. “It is also about what the implications are for other areas, such as Papua, where raising a pro-independence flag has been the iconic act of political resistance”.
“Aceh looks increasingly like a one-party state”, says Jim Della-Giacoma, Crisis Group’s Asia Program Director. “The question is whether Partai Aceh uses its power to improve the welfare of its poorest constituents or to entrench another elite”.
FULL BRIEFING

Indonesia: Tensions over Aceh’s Flag

Jakarta/Brussels  |   7 May 2013

A dispute over a flag in Aceh is testing the limits of autonomy, irritating Indonesia’s central government, heightening ethnic tensions, reviving a campaign for the division of the province and raising fears of violence as the 2014 national elections approach.

Indonesia: Tensions over Aceh’s Flag, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group, examines the political fallout from the Aceh provincial legislature’s adoption of a regulation on 25 March making the banner of the former rebel Free Aceh Movement (Gerakan Aceh Merdeka, GAM) the province’s official flag. The central government says the regulation violates a law banning separatist symbols and must be changed. Partai Aceh, the political party set up by the former rebels, says the flag cannot be separatist since GAM leaders signed a 2005 peace agreement with the Indonesian government in Helsinki in which it acknowledged Indonesian sovereignty.

The briefing’s major findings and recommendations are:

  • Partai Aceh sees no need to compromise because its leaders believe Jakarta will capitulate, as it has in the past. It also wants to use the enormous emotive power of the flag to mobilise voters in 2014.
  • Either way, Partai Aceh wins. If Jakarta rejects the flag, the party can score points with its supporters, because defying the central government is a vote-getter. If it accepts the flag, Partai Aceh will be convinced that obstinacy pays, and its leaders are likely to press for more authority.
  • Partai Aceh is systematically entrenching its control over political institutions in the province, making it less likely that any democratic challenge to its control will succeed. It already controls the executive and legislative branches in the provincial government, as well as most of the most populous districts. It is exerting influence over the civil service and local election commission. It is also in control of a new bureaucracy set up to safeguard Acehnese culture and values, known as the WaliNanggroe (Guardian of the State).

“This dispute is about much more than whether the flag constitutes a separatist symbol. It is about where Aceh is headed and what its relations with Jakarta will be”, says Sidney Jones, Crisis Group’s Senior Asia Adviser. “It is also about what the implications are for other areas, such as Papua, where raising a pro-independence flag has been the iconic act of political resistance”.

“Aceh looks increasingly like a one-party state”, says Jim Della-Giacoma, Crisis Group’s Asia Program Director. “The question is whether Partai Aceh uses its power to improve the welfare of its poorest constituents or to entrench another elite”.

FULL BRIEFING

12 Feb
Indonesian anti-terror squad killings prompt revenge attacks | Radio Australia
Indonesia’s anti-terror squad Detachment 88 is being warned that it’s encouraging revenge attacks by shooting terrorist suspects.
The crack squad was trained and funded by Australia and other allies.
Since 2002, police from the squad and other officers have shot dead 90 terrorist suspects.
Now the International Crisis Group’s terrorism expert Dr Sidney Jones says the Squad’s methods are prompting counter attacks.
FULL TRANSCRIPT (Radio Australia)
Photo: Ben Hammersley/Flickr

Indonesian anti-terror squad killings prompt revenge attacks | Radio Australia

Indonesia’s anti-terror squad Detachment 88 is being warned that it’s encouraging revenge attacks by shooting terrorist suspects.

The crack squad was trained and funded by Australia and other allies.

Since 2002, police from the squad and other officers have shot dead 90 terrorist suspects.

Now the International Crisis Group’s terrorism expert Dr Sidney Jones says the Squad’s methods are prompting counter attacks.

FULL TRANSCRIPT (Radio Australia)

Photo: Ben Hammersley/Flickr

31 Jan
Terrorism: myths and facts
Lecture delivered at Parahyangan Catholic University in Bandung, Indonesia
By Sidney Jones, Crisis Group’s Asia Program Senior Adviser
Terrorism is a very difficult and emotional subject, but it is one that deserves serious study. The word suggests an extraordinary crime with massive casualties of innocent people, with the iconic image now being the attack on the World Trade Center in New York. The word “terrorist” is also loaded — it conjures up images of ruthless killers, like Anders Breivik, the Norwegian gunman who killed 77 young political activists in 2011.
But it’s much more complicated than that. Not all terrorism involves large numbers of deaths: in 2011 in Indonesia, for example, we had eight separate terrorist incidents and a total death toll of five, including two bombers who killed only themselves. Not all crimes are instantly recognizable as terrorism. Suicide bombings have become the classic terrorist crime, but what about the robbery of an ATM or the shooting of a policeman? They might be terrorism, but they can also be acts of rebellion or ordinary crimes, depending on the circumstances and who was involved. Drawing those lines is not always easy. The problem gets even more complicated when we try and understand the causes of terrorism. Why in one village is one young man tempted to join an extremist network while his neighbor, of the exact same age, education, religious training and economic background, is not?
FULL TEXT (Crisis Group)
Photo: Dmitry Valberg/Flickr

Terrorism: myths and facts

Lecture delivered at Parahyangan Catholic University in Bandung, Indonesia

By Sidney Jones, Crisis Group’s Asia Program Senior Adviser

Terrorism is a very difficult and emotional subject, but it is one that deserves serious study. The word suggests an extraordinary crime with massive casualties of innocent people, with the iconic image now being the attack on the World Trade Center in New York. The word “terrorist” is also loaded — it conjures up images of ruthless killers, like Anders Breivik, the Norwegian gunman who killed 77 young political activists in 2011.

But it’s much more complicated than that. Not all terrorism involves large numbers of deaths: in 2011 in Indonesia, for example, we had eight separate terrorist incidents and a total death toll of five, including two bombers who killed only themselves. Not all crimes are instantly recognizable as terrorism. Suicide bombings have become the classic terrorist crime, but what about the robbery of an ATM or the shooting of a policeman? They might be terrorism, but they can also be acts of rebellion or ordinary crimes, depending on the circumstances and who was involved. Drawing those lines is not always easy. The problem gets even more complicated when we try and understand the causes of terrorism. Why in one village is one young man tempted to join an extremist network while his neighbor, of the exact same age, education, religious training and economic background, is not?

FULL TEXT (Crisis Group)

Photo: Dmitry Valberg/Flickr

1 Dec
Sidney Jones, Crisis Group’s Asia Program Senior Adviser spoke about extremism and democracy in Indonesia in a lecture series hosted by the Australian Institute of International Affairs on Thursday.  Listen to the lecture here.

Sidney Jones, Crisis Group’s Asia Program Senior Adviser spoke about extremism and democracy in Indonesia in a lecture series hosted by the Australian Institute of International Affairs on Thursday.  Listen to the lecture here.

"As Indonesian democracy has matured, it has given rise to a whole range of groups, including some very hard-line, one could say anti-democratic Islamist forces, which engage in low-level violence in the name of anti-vice campaigns."

—Sidney Jones, Crisis Group’s Asia Program Senior Adviser, speaking with ABC Radio Australia’s Karon Snowdon on terrorism in Indonesia: Indonesia complacent about emerging extremists, says rights group

10 Oct

Sidney Jones, Crisis Group’s Asia Program Senior Adviser, talks to the Lowy Institute for International Policy about Malaysian elections in this video

1 Oct
"Both sides are using images of the Arab Spring, with Barisan warning of chaos if it is not returned to power and the opposition predicting popular unrest unless political change comes faster."

—Sidney Jones, Senior Adviser to Crisis Group’s Asia Program, on our latest report, Malaysia’s Coming Election: Beyond Communalism?

18 Jul
NGOs Call on Govt to Do More in Indonesia’s Fight Against Terror  |  Jakarta Globe
By Ulma Haryanto
The government needs to do more to combat religious violence and improve prison management to better combat terrorism, the International Crisis Group said in its latest report released on Monday. 
FULL ARTICLE (Jakarta Globe)
Photo: Indonesian soldiers boarding the USNS Mercy as part of the Pacific Partnership | Credit: Official U.S. Navy Imagery/Flickr

NGOs Call on Govt to Do More in Indonesia’s Fight Against Terror  |  Jakarta Globe

By Ulma Haryanto

The government needs to do more to combat religious violence and improve prison management to better combat terrorism, the International Crisis Group said in its latest report released on Monday. 

FULL ARTICLE (Jakarta Globe)

Photo: Indonesian soldiers boarding the USNS Mercy as part of the Pacific Partnership | Credit: Official U.S. Navy Imagery/Flickr

17 Jul
LINK

World News Australia: Muslim extremists 'still pose a threat'