Showing posts tagged as "sanctions"

Showing posts tagged sanctions

17 Sep

With A Deadline Looming, Iran’s Nuclear Talks Reopen In New York | PETER KENYON

Negotiations on limiting Iran’s nuclear program resume this week in New York, but a summer of multiplying crises has world capitals distracted as the talks hit a crucial stage.

The high-profile setting for this round of talks between Iran and six world powers has raised expectations, and the talks come at a time when world leaders are also gathering for the U.N. General Assembly meeting.

The last round of talks, aimed at giving Iran sanctions relief if it accepts strict limits intended to keep it from acquiring a nuclear weapon, ended in Vienna in July with only an agreement to keep trying for a few more months.

Now, as a crisis-heavy summer turns into fall, the Ukraine conflict, the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the extremist violence in Iraq and Syria are all threatening to overshadow the Iran issue.

READ FULL TRANSCRIPT (NPR)

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27 May

Senior Analyst Ali Vaez looks at the way forward in the nuclear negotiations between Iran and the P5+1.

Senior Analyst Ali Vaez explains the real power behind sanctions.

27 Sep
Unwinding of Iran sanctions would prove difficult | Gary Gentile
Hope that Iran and the US might be closer to resolving the dispute over Iran’s nuclear program have led some to ask how quickly sanctions that have choked off Iran’s ability to sell crude, access financial systems, and repatriate money it earns from global oil sales could end.
But analysts point out that the tangled web of US and international sanctions against Iran would be difficult to unwind even if Western nations wanted to provide incentives or reward Iran’s new regime for concessions regarding its nuclear program.
FULL ARTICLE (Platts) 
Photo: danwalker90/Flickr

Unwinding of Iran sanctions would prove difficult | Gary Gentile

Hope that Iran and the US might be closer to resolving the dispute over Iran’s nuclear program have led some to ask how quickly sanctions that have choked off Iran’s ability to sell crude, access financial systems, and repatriate money it earns from global oil sales could end.

But analysts point out that the tangled web of US and international sanctions against Iran would be difficult to unwind even if Western nations wanted to provide incentives or reward Iran’s new regime for concessions regarding its nuclear program.

FULL ARTICLE (Platts) 

Photo: danwalker90/Flickr

6 Aug
Iran Sanctions: Which way out? | Ali Vaez
The United States has imposed several layers of sanctions against Iran—for widely diverse reasons—dating back to the 1979 revolution. Tehran now wants relief from sanctions as part of any diplomatic deal on its controversial nuclear program. But lifting sanctions is often harder than imposing them—and varies depending on the issues, origins and methods imposed.
FULL ARTICLE (USIP) 
Photo:  · · · — — — · · ·/Flickr

Iran Sanctions: Which way out? | Ali Vaez

The United States has imposed several layers of sanctions against Iran—for widely diverse reasons—dating back to the 1979 revolution. Tehran now wants relief from sanctions as part of any diplomatic deal on its controversial nuclear program. But lifting sanctions is often harder than imposing them—and varies depending on the issues, origins and methods imposed.

FULL ARTICLE (USIP) 

Photo:  · · · — — — · · ·/Flickr

7 May
Crisis Group’s Senior Iran Adviser Ali Vaez’s recent piece for the Arms Control Association: “Iran’s Nuclear Program and the Sanctions Siege" (paywall)
Photo: Alex Jagendorf/Flickr

Crisis Group’s Senior Iran Adviser Ali Vaez’s recent piece for the Arms Control Association: “Iran’s Nuclear Program and the Sanctions Siege" (paywall)

Photo: Alex Jagendorf/Flickr

27 Mar
US ‘shock and audit’ over Iraq expenses | Al Jazeera
By Charles McDermid
Honest, aggressive and meticulous, “Learning From Iraq” is an important historical document, perhaps the most essential Washington-sanctioned databank for evaluating the US legacy in Iraq.
Still, it hardly explains the wreckage of today’s Iraq, the impoverished, jobless, powder-keg of a nation that the US left behind, or how nine years of botched reconstruction efforts helped thrust the country into an uncertain future.
Maria Fantappie, Baghdad-based Iraq analyst for the International Crisis Group, describes a “heavy heritage of fear” that exists for an entire young generation of Iraqis for whom political instability and recurrent crisis “continuously fuel suspicion”.
“The most affected are the youth, those born during the sanctions of the 1990s and grew up in the decade since the 2003 invasion. Problems were exacerbated during that time,” Fantappie told Al Jazeera.
“Most Iraqis developed ways of coping with the additional challenges that the invasion brought: reduced mobility, increased security checks, even the worsening services.
“What they are longing for now is a state they can trust.”
FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera)
Photo: The U.S. Army/Flickr

US ‘shock and audit’ over Iraq expenses | Al Jazeera

By Charles McDermid

Honest, aggressive and meticulous, “Learning From Iraq” is an important historical document, perhaps the most essential Washington-sanctioned databank for evaluating the US legacy in Iraq.

Still, it hardly explains the wreckage of today’s Iraq, the impoverished, jobless, powder-keg of a nation that the US left behind, or how nine years of botched reconstruction efforts helped thrust the country into an uncertain future.

Maria Fantappie, Baghdad-based Iraq analyst for the International Crisis Group, describes a “heavy heritage of fear” that exists for an entire young generation of Iraqis for whom political instability and recurrent crisis “continuously fuel suspicion”.

“The most affected are the youth, those born during the sanctions of the 1990s and grew up in the decade since the 2003 invasion. Problems were exacerbated during that time,” Fantappie told Al Jazeera.

“Most Iraqis developed ways of coping with the additional challenges that the invasion brought: reduced mobility, increased security checks, even the worsening services.

“What they are longing for now is a state they can trust.”

FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera)

Photo: The U.S. Army/Flickr

26 Mar
Hey Tumblr, check out our newest interactive presentation, the tie-in for Crisis Group’s recent report, Spider Web: The Making and Unmaking of Iran Sanctions.
Click here to learn about three decades of sanctions.

Hey Tumblr, check out our newest interactive presentation, the tie-in for Crisis Group’s recent report, Spider Web: The Making and Unmaking of Iran Sanctions.

Click here to learn about three decades of sanctions.

8 Mar

Listen to Ali Vaez, Crisis Group’s Senior Iran Analyst, discuss the latest round of talks between Iran and the P5+1 on sanctions and Iran’s nuclear enrichment program in Crisis Group’s recent podcast, Spider Web: The Making and Unmaking of Iran Sanctions

(Source: crisisgroup.org / Crisis Group)

1 Mar
Now There’s Proof: Washington May Have Violated Its Own Iran Sanctions | National Journal
By Brian Fung
The U.S. government learned this week that it might have run afoul of its own sanctions on Iran — an awkward development, given that the economic penalties are at the heart of international efforts to pressure Tehran over its nuclear program. But here’s why it might not be as embarrassing as it sounds:
It begins with a report from the Government Accountability Office revealing that Washington had paid a South Korean contractor $1.5 million to build some houses. The deal itself was nothing controversial. But the same investigation by GAO also found that the contractor, Daelim, had done business with Iran’s energy industry. In effect, that means the United States indirectly helped Iran’s government through a third party — and ran directly afoul of international sanctions levied against the pariah state.
“With sanctions configured as they are, you can generally work in either our financial system or in the Iranian financial system,” said Jonathan Schanzer, vice president of research at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. “It appears that in the case of this one company, they were not put to that choice.”
FULL ARTICLE (National Journal)

Now There’s Proof: Washington May Have Violated Its Own Iran Sanctions | National Journal

By Brian Fung

The U.S. government learned this week that it might have run afoul of its own sanctions on Iran — an awkward development, given that the economic penalties are at the heart of international efforts to pressure Tehran over its nuclear program. But here’s why it might not be as embarrassing as it sounds:

It begins with a report from the Government Accountability Office revealing that Washington had paid a South Korean contractor $1.5 million to build some houses. The deal itself was nothing controversial. But the same investigation by GAO also found that the contractor, Daelim, had done business with Iran’s energy industry. In effect, that means the United States indirectly helped Iran’s government through a third party — and ran directly afoul of international sanctions levied against the pariah state.

“With sanctions configured as they are, you can generally work in either our financial system or in the Iranian financial system,” said Jonathan Schanzer, vice president of research at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. “It appears that in the case of this one company, they were not put to that choice.”

FULL ARTICLE (National Journal)