Showing posts tagged as "r2p"

Showing posts tagged r2p

17 Dec

Join the Crisis Group conversation!

Watch Louise Arbour and Kofi Annan on the responsibility to protect, Comfort Ero on the militarisation of peacekeeping, Thomas Pickering on UN Security Council reform, and George Soros on the breakdown of the rule of law.

Crisis Group’s annual briefing brings serious thought to foreign policy’s hardest questions.

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28 Oct
Louise Arbour on ICC and R2P | Matthew Waxman
Louise Arbour, president of the International Crisis Group, delivered a very powerful critique last week of existing doctrines and frameworks for promoting international justice, humanitarian protection, and rule of law. Her tough assessment of the International Criminal Court and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine are especially noteworthy because Arbour, a former Canadian Supreme Court justice, previously served as UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and as Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda.
FULL ARTICLE (Lawfare)
Photo: United Nations - Geneva/Flickr

Louise Arbour on ICC and R2P | Matthew Waxman

Louise Arbour, president of the International Crisis Group, delivered a very powerful critique last week of existing doctrines and frameworks for promoting international justice, humanitarian protection, and rule of law. Her tough assessment of the International Criminal Court and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine are especially noteworthy because Arbour, a former Canadian Supreme Court justice, previously served as UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and as Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda.

FULL ARTICLE (Lawfare)

Photo: United Nations - Geneva/Flickr

Louise Arbour on ICC and R2P

By Matthew Waxman 

Louise Arbour, president of the International Crisis Group, delivered a very powerful critique last week of existing doctrines and frameworks for promoting international justice, humanitarian protection, and rule of law. Her tough assessment of the International Criminal Court and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine are especially noteworthy because Arbour, a former Canadian Supreme Court justice, previously served as UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and as Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda.

FULL POST (Lawfare)

26 Oct

Doctrines Derailed?: Internationalism’s Uncertain Future

Global Briefing 2013 opening speech from the International Crisis Group’s President & CEO Louise Arbour. In her opening remarks, Arbour looks at the pursuit of international criminal justice; the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine; peacekeeping missions; and the international promotion of the Rule of Law. The shortcomings of these existing frameworks for conflict prevention are highlighted as she argues that it is only by acknowledging the inadequacies of our approaches that we have any chance of improving them. We are encouraged to fine-tune the tools of conflict management and use them more wisely to advance peace and security.

4 Sep
Syrie: L’International Crisis Group s’oppose fortement à toute intervention militaire | Ismail Beji
Alors que la possibilité de frappes militaires contre le régime syrien se fait de plus en plus précise, le célèbre think tank International crisis group s’est exprimé sur la question.
A travers un communiqué publié dimanche 1er septembre 2013, le groupe de réflexion rappelle les conséquences probables d’une telle opération. Des frappes militaires en Syrie seraient, selon eux, diamétralement opposées aux intérêts du peuple syrien dont le bien-être ne pourra être assuré que par l’instauration d’un cessez-le-feu et une transition politique faisant consensus.
Lire tout l’article (Huffington Post Maghreb)
Photo: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff/Flickr

Syrie: L’International Crisis Group s’oppose fortement à toute intervention militaire | Ismail Beji

Alors que la possibilité de frappes militaires contre le régime syrien se fait de plus en plus précise, le célèbre think tank International crisis group s’est exprimé sur la question.

A travers un communiqué publié dimanche 1er septembre 2013, le groupe de réflexion rappelle les conséquences probables d’une telle opération. Des frappes militaires en Syrie seraient, selon eux, diamétralement opposées aux intérêts du peuple syrien dont le bien-être ne pourra être assuré que par l’instauration d’un cessez-le-feu et une transition politique faisant consensus.

Lire tout l’article (Huffington Post Maghreb)

Photo: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff/Flickr

23 Jan

Our President, Louise Arbour, took part in a panel last week hosted by the Stanley Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation and the MacArthur Foundation, R2P as a Tool — Identifying Past and Potential Value. Click to watch the discussion and her remarks.

Atlantic: How the World Could—And Maybe Should—Intervene in Syria

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Anne-Marie Slaughter on the case for R2P in Syria:

Last week the Carnegie Corporation, the Stanley Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation sponsored a terrific conference on the next decade of R2P. Panel members discussed the pros and cons of R2P interventions to date and what we might expect in the future. During the question period after the second morning panel, former International Criminal Court Prosecutor and current International Crisis Group President Louise Arbour said that she agreed with Gareth Evans’ (the former Australian foreign minister and a member of the original commission that gave rise to R2P) analysis that the preconditions for an R2P intervention in Syria were not met. Arbour said that, in terms of the magnitude of the crimes being committed in Syria (over 5,000 deaths, destruction of opposition towns) and the lack of effective alternatives other than force, the threshold for an R2P intervention was met. But she said an intervention in Syria failed the third criterion, whether intervention would do more good than harm. 

I disagree with Arbour’s assessment, if in fact the conditions I spelled out above could be met. But that’s not the point. She made the further point that if the international community is NOT going to intervene, then R2P includes the responsibility to tell protesters on the ground that help will not be forthcoming, so that they can make their own plans accordingly. Arbour is right. But then the U.S., Turkish, and other governments saying that Assad’s fall is “just a matter of time” must be prepared to answer the question posed by protesters in the picture below honestly: “we won’t be coming.” But then we must also be prepared to face the consequences. In a recent Al Jazeera report, the source of the photo at the top of this page, reporter Zeina Khodr quoted one opposition figure as saying that Syria will descend into “endless chaos.” 

FULL ARTICLE (The Atlantic)

Photo: Protesters in Syria / Al Jazeera English