Showing posts tagged as "nairobi"

Showing posts tagged nairobi

16 Apr

The security sweep – at one point 6,000 police descended on Eastleigh and neighbouring Majengo and Pangani – and mass arrests are particularly poignant for Kenyans of Somali heritage, a significant minority population whose districts were for long years under a state of emergency.

—Cedric Barnes, “Losing Hearts and Minds in Kenya”

The security sweep – at one point 6,000 police descended on Eastleigh and neighbouring Majengo and Pangani – and mass arrests are particularly poignant for Kenyans of Somali heritage, a significant minority population whose districts were for long years under a state of emergency.

—Cedric Barnes, “Losing Hearts and Minds in Kenya

"In the space of little more than a week, Kenyan Somalis (almost 2 million people), along with half a million refugees and migrants, have found themselves to be in a targeted class."

—Cedric Barnes, “Losing Hearts and Minds in Kenya”, The African Peacebuilding Agenda

25 Sep
Kenya Attack Unfolded In Up and Down Twitter Feeds | Lori Hinnant
As the deadly attack unfolded inside Kenya’s Westgate mall, the militants who claimed responsibility for the spreading mayhem sent out tweet after tweet, taunting the Kenyan military, defending the mass killings and threatening more bloodshed.
Each time Twitter shut the account down — a total of five times, according to a U.S.-based security analyst — al-Shabab started a new feed. The sixth account included a post on Tuesday linking to a photo that purported to be two of the attackers “unruffled and strolling around the mall in such sangfroid manner” and mocking Kenya’s security forces for their repeated assurances over two days — also tweeted — that the siege was nearly over.
FULL ARTICLE (AP) 
Photo: Johan Larsson/Flickr

Kenya Attack Unfolded In Up and Down Twitter Feeds | Lori Hinnant

As the deadly attack unfolded inside Kenya’s Westgate mall, the militants who claimed responsibility for the spreading mayhem sent out tweet after tweet, taunting the Kenyan military, defending the mass killings and threatening more bloodshed.

Each time Twitter shut the account down — a total of five times, according to a U.S.-based security analyst — al-Shabab started a new feed. The sixth account included a post on Tuesday linking to a photo that purported to be two of the attackers “unruffled and strolling around the mall in such sangfroid manner” and mocking Kenya’s security forces for their repeated assurances over two days — also tweeted — that the siege was nearly over.

FULL ARTICLE (AP) 

Photo: Johan Larsson/Flickr

Kenyan officials say Nairobi mall siege is over; attack may bolster al-Shabab in jihadists’ eyes | Sudarsan Raghavan
The bloody siege of an upscale mall by Islamist militants ended Tuesday with five of the attackers dead and 11 taken into custody, amid fears that the death toll of more than 60 civilians could substantially rise when authorities begin searching through the wreckage.
“As a nation, our head is bloodied but unbowed,” Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said in a televised address, declaring three days of mourning. “We have ashamed and defeated our attackers.”
FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)
Photo: Uhuru Kenyatta/Flickr

Kenyan officials say Nairobi mall siege is over; attack may bolster al-Shabab in jihadists’ eyes | Sudarsan Raghavan

The bloody siege of an upscale mall by Islamist militants ended Tuesday with five of the attackers dead and 11 taken into custody, amid fears that the death toll of more than 60 civilians could substantially rise when authorities begin searching through the wreckage.

“As a nation, our head is bloodied but unbowed,” Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said in a televised address, declaring three days of mourning. “We have ashamed and defeated our attackers.”

FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)

Photo: Uhuru Kenyatta/Flickr

Kenya’s Brutal Coming of Age | Cedric Barnes
The terrorist attack on the Westgate Mall, in the center of this increasingly prosperous — for some at least — capital, is a cruelly ironic indicator of the arrival of Kenya as a serious regional power, a hub for international business and diplomacy, and a target for international Islamic armed radicals.
Even more so than the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies here and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, the deadly mall attack — a four-day siege that began on Saturday and resulted in at least 60 deaths — is a reminder of Kenya’s coming of age. It heralds a difficult period for a country waging a war that is at once beyond its borders and very close to home.
FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)
Photo: United States Marine Corps/Wikimedia Commons

Kenya’s Brutal Coming of Age | Cedric Barnes

The terrorist attack on the Westgate Mall, in the center of this increasingly prosperous — for some at least — capital, is a cruelly ironic indicator of the arrival of Kenya as a serious regional power, a hub for international business and diplomacy, and a target for international Islamic armed radicals.

Even more so than the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies here and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, the deadly mall attack — a four-day siege that began on Saturday and resulted in at least 60 deaths — is a reminder of Kenya’s coming of age. It heralds a difficult period for a country waging a war that is at once beyond its borders and very close to home.

FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)

Photo: United States Marine Corps/Wikimedia Commons

24 Sep
Global jihad: smoke signals from Mumbai to Nairobi | Leela Jacinto
As thick black plumes of smoke rose from Nairobi’s besieged Westgate mall on Monday, the scene was disconcertingly reminiscent of the flames billowing out of the Taj hotel cupola during the 2008 Mumbai attacks.
From the target choice of landmark locations that attract internationals and local elites, to the multipronged nature of the attack involving gunfights, grenades, hostages and sieges, to the reassuring statements by authorities that the situation is under control when it’s obviously not – there are many similarities between Mumbai 2008 and Nairobi 2013.
FULL ARTICLE (France 24)
Photo: asands/Flickr

Global jihad: smoke signals from Mumbai to Nairobi | Leela Jacinto

As thick black plumes of smoke rose from Nairobi’s besieged Westgate mall on Monday, the scene was disconcertingly reminiscent of the flames billowing out of the Taj hotel cupola during the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

From the target choice of landmark locations that attract internationals and local elites, to the multipronged nature of the attack involving gunfights, grenades, hostages and sieges, to the reassuring statements by authorities that the situation is under control when it’s obviously not – there are many similarities between Mumbai 2008 and Nairobi 2013.

FULL ARTICLE (France 24)

Photo: asands/Flickr

23 Sep
'This is not Kenya's war' | James Reinl
When she heard the first crackle of shots, Fiona Herbert thought she was listening to fireworks, rather than the bullets that signalled the start of a bloody siege on an upmarket shopping mall here in Kenya’s capital.
The 34-year-old Briton, who lives in Kenya, described chaotic scenes as she grabbed her baby son and darted out of the ground-floor cafe, fleeing with other shoppers into a furniture shop, jamming a chair behind the door and ducking into a store room.
Outside, around a dozen masked attackers tossed grenades and shot shoppers in the head, using pistols and assault rifles, ostensibly to advance the cause of al-Shabaab, an armed Somali outfit with links to al-Qaeda and ambitions to topple their country’s UN-backed government.
FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera English) 
Photo: hktang/Flickr

'This is not Kenya's war' | James Reinl

When she heard the first crackle of shots, Fiona Herbert thought she was listening to fireworks, rather than the bullets that signalled the start of a bloody siege on an upmarket shopping mall here in Kenya’s capital.

The 34-year-old Briton, who lives in Kenya, described chaotic scenes as she grabbed her baby son and darted out of the ground-floor cafe, fleeing with other shoppers into a furniture shop, jamming a chair behind the door and ducking into a store room.

Outside, around a dozen masked attackers tossed grenades and shot shoppers in the head, using pistols and assault rifles, ostensibly to advance the cause of al-Shabaab, an armed Somali outfit with links to al-Qaeda and ambitions to topple their country’s UN-backed government.

FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera English) 

Photo: hktang/Flickr

Nairobi attack, “Kenyan-grown plot” | Radio France Internationale

Somalia’s Shebab insurgents have claimed responsibility for the attack in Nairobi. But Kenyan army chief Julius Karangi has said the gunmen were of different nationalities. Many foreign fighters, including Somalis with dual citizenships are members of the Shebab. But analyst Cedric Barnes, the Horn of Africa director of the International Crisis Group, says the siege of the Westgate mall bears the hallmarks of al Qaeda. He spoke to RFI’s Nicolas Champeaux. 

FULL INTERVIEW (Radio France Internationale)

10 Dec
Second bomb this week kills three in Nairobi suburb | Reuters
By Richard Lough
A bomb blast in a predominantly Somali district of the Kenyan capital of Nairobi on Friday killed three people and wounded at least eight, the Kenyan Red Cross said.
There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack in the run-down Eastleigh suburb, the second explosion there since Wednesday night. Local lawmaker Yusuf Hassan was among the injured, Nairobi’s police chief Moses Ombati said.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: Dan Kori/Flickr

Second bomb this week kills three in Nairobi suburb | Reuters

By Richard Lough

A bomb blast in a predominantly Somali district of the Kenyan capital of Nairobi on Friday killed three people and wounded at least eight, the Kenyan Red Cross said.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack in the run-down Eastleigh suburb, the second explosion there since Wednesday night. Local lawmaker Yusuf Hassan was among the injured, Nairobi’s police chief Moses Ombati said.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: Dan Kori/Flickr

25 Jan

Kenyan Somali Islamist Radicalisation

Africa Briefing N°85, 25 Jan 2012

Somalia’s growing Islamist radicalism is spilling over into Kenya. The militant Al-Shabaab movement has built a cross-border presence and a clandestine support network among Muslim populations in the north east and Nairobi and on the coast, and is trying to radicalise and recruit youth from these communities, often capitalising on long-standing grievances against the central state. This problem could grow more severe with the October 2011 decision by the Kenyan government to intervene directly in Somalia. Radicalisation is a grave threat to Kenya’s security and stability. Formulating and executing sound counter-radicalisation and de-radicalisation policies before it is too late must be a priority. It would be a profound mistake, however, to view the challenge solely through a counter-terrorism lens.

Kenya’s North Eastern Province emerged as a distinct administrative entity dominated by ethnic Somalis after independence. It is, by most accounts, the worst victim of unequal development. A history of insurgency, misrule and repression, chronic poverty, massive youth unemployment, high population growth, insecurity, poor infrastructure and lack of basic services, have combined to produce some of the country’s bleakest socio-economic and political conditions.

Two decades of conflict in neighbouring Somalia have also had a largely negative effect on the province and Kenyan Somalis. The long and porous border is impossible to police effectively. Small arms flow across unchecked, creating a cycle of demand that fuels armed criminality and encourages clans to rearm. Somali clan-identity politics, animosities and jingoism frequently spill over into the province, poisoning its politics, undermining cohesion and triggering bloody clashes. The massive stream of refugees into overflowing camps creates an additional strain on locals and the country. Many are now also moving to major urban centres, competing with other Kenyans for jobs and business opportunities triggering a strong official and public backlash against Somalis, both from Somalia and Kenya.

FULL BRIEFING (crisisgroup.org)