Showing posts tagged as "muslim brotherhood"

Showing posts tagged muslim brotherhood

5 Mar
Analysis: Reconciliation looks remote in Egypt | IRIN News
The seven months since July’s overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi in Egypt have been among the most violent and divisive in recent times, analysts say, as much of society polarizes along pro-Muslim Brotherhood (MB) and pro-army lines. 
Reconciliation seems a distant prospect and more remote now, some argue, than in the immediate aftermath of the army takeover. 
“The reconciliation opportunity, which existed after Morsi’s overthrow, has disappeared,” said Issandr el Amrani, an International Crisis Group (ICG) analyst on Egypt. “Now that the officials and media call the Brotherhood a `terrorist organization’ and hold them responsible for all the attacks, [the security forces] have to stick to this point of view.” 
FULL ARTICLE (IRIN News)
Photo: oxfamnovib/flickr

Analysis: Reconciliation looks remote in Egypt | IRIN News

The seven months since July’s overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi in Egypt have been among the most violent and divisive in recent times, analysts say, as much of society polarizes along pro-Muslim Brotherhood (MB) and pro-army lines. 

Reconciliation seems a distant prospect and more remote now, some argue, than in the immediate aftermath of the army takeover. 

“The reconciliation opportunity, which existed after Morsi’s overthrow, has disappeared,” said Issandr el Amrani, an International Crisis Group (ICG) analyst on Egypt. “Now that the officials and media call the Brotherhood a `terrorist organization’ and hold them responsible for all the attacks, [the security forces] have to stick to this point of view.” 

FULL ARTICLE (IRIN News)

Photo: oxfamnovib/flickr

12 Sep
Are ‘opportunistic armed men’ reviving an Egyptian insurgency? | Louisa Loveluck
 In a cramped Cairo hospital waiting room on Sep. 5, an army lieutenant colonel held a battered copy of a list of names of policemen injured in an assassination attempt against Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim that morning.
The army officer was stationed inside the hospital grounds with dozens of his troops, as part of a large security deployment in the area.
“You want proof that the Muslim Brotherhood are terrorists?” the officer, who gave his name as Alaa, said, brandishing the list.
“Well here it is.” 
The explosion outside Ibrahim’s home in the middle of the afternoon last week killed one person and left 21 injured. 
FULL ARTICLE (NBC News)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Flickr

Are ‘opportunistic armed men’ reviving an Egyptian insurgency? | Louisa Loveluck

 In a cramped Cairo hospital waiting room on Sep. 5, an army lieutenant colonel held a battered copy of a list of names of policemen injured in an assassination attempt against Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim that morning.

The army officer was stationed inside the hospital grounds with dozens of his troops, as part of a large security deployment in the area.

“You want proof that the Muslim Brotherhood are terrorists?” the officer, who gave his name as Alaa, said, brandishing the list.

“Well here it is.” 

The explosion outside Ibrahim’s home in the middle of the afternoon last week killed one person and left 21 injured. 

FULL ARTICLE (NBC News)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Flickr

10 Sep
Egypt NGOs denounce military trials of civilians | The News
Four Egyptian rights groups on Monday denounced the military trials of civilians accused of attacking soldiers, saying the army had convicted more than 60 people since president Mohammed Mursi’s ouster.
The NGOs urged interim president Adly Mansour, who was appointed by the army following Mursi’s removal, to “immediately amend the law in order to prohibit trials of civilians by military tribunals”.
FULL ARTICLE (The News)
Photo: Hossam el-Hamalawy/Flickr

Egypt NGOs denounce military trials of civilians | The News

Four Egyptian rights groups on Monday denounced the military trials of civilians accused of attacking soldiers, saying the army had convicted more than 60 people since president Mohammed Mursi’s ouster.

The NGOs urged interim president Adly Mansour, who was appointed by the army following Mursi’s removal, to “immediately amend the law in order to prohibit trials of civilians by military tribunals”.

FULL ARTICLE (The News)

Photo: Hossam el-Hamalawy/Flickr

16 Aug
Egypt’s Brotherhood loses grip as anger boils | Michael Georgy and Tom Perry
Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and its allies suffered a heavy blow from the state security crackdown, their central coordination has been lost and the bloodshed means anger is now “beyond control,” the group said on Thursday.
The comments by spokesman Gehad El-Haddad pointed to the depth of the crisis facing the movement that just six weeks ago controlled the presidency but is now struggling to keep a grip over its base with hundreds killed by the police in 24 hours.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: Globovisión/Flickr

Egypt’s Brotherhood loses grip as anger boils | Michael Georgy and Tom Perry

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and its allies suffered a heavy blow from the state security crackdown, their central coordination has been lost and the bloodshed means anger is now “beyond control,” the group said on Thursday.

The comments by spokesman Gehad El-Haddad pointed to the depth of the crisis facing the movement that just six weeks ago controlled the presidency but is now struggling to keep a grip over its base with hundreds killed by the police in 24 hours.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: Globovisión/Flickr

14 Aug
The Liberal Dark Side | James Traub
Of all the dreadful features of Egypt’s coup — or second revolution, if you prefer — the one which has left me feeling most discouraged is the almost universal embrace by the country’s liberal activists of the principle that rule by the military is preferable to rule by elected Islamists — even if that means crushing the Muslim Brotherhood as brutally as the government of Hosni Mubarak once crushed the liberals themselves (and the Brotherhood). A recent report by the International Crisis Group cites a senior member of the left-leaning Social Democratic party on just this Faustian bargain: “The new mindset is that ‘yes,’ Islamists may get radicalised, but we are ready to confront that and pay the cost of it…. The state apparatus is willing to deal with a cycle of violence rather than surrender its control over the state.”
FULL ARTICLE (Foreign Policy)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Flickr

The Liberal Dark Side | James Traub

Of all the dreadful features of Egypt’s coup — or second revolution, if you prefer — the one which has left me feeling most discouraged is the almost universal embrace by the country’s liberal activists of the principle that rule by the military is preferable to rule by elected Islamists — even if that means crushing the Muslim Brotherhood as brutally as the government of Hosni Mubarak once crushed the liberals themselves (and the Brotherhood). A recent report by the International Crisis Group cites a senior member of the left-leaning Social Democratic party on just this Faustian bargain: “The new mindset is that ‘yes,’ Islamists may get radicalised, but we are ready to confront that and pay the cost of it…. The state apparatus is willing to deal with a cycle of violence rather than surrender its control over the state.”

FULL ARTICLE (Foreign Policy)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Flickr

9 Aug
Egypt crisis enters tense new phase after mediation collapses | Angus MacSwan and Tom Perry
Egypt’s political crisis entered a tense new phase on Wednesday after international mediation efforts collapsed and the army-installed government repeated its threat to take action against supporters of deposed President Mohamed Mursi.
Both sides called their supporters on to the streets on Thursday and in two protest camps in Cairo, Mursi supporters strengthened sandbag-and brick barricades in readiness for any action by security forces.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: Nasser Nouri/Flickr

Egypt crisis enters tense new phase after mediation collapses | Angus MacSwan and Tom Perry

Egypt’s political crisis entered a tense new phase on Wednesday after international mediation efforts collapsed and the army-installed government repeated its threat to take action against supporters of deposed President Mohamed Mursi.

Both sides called their supporters on to the streets on Thursday and in two protest camps in Cairo, Mursi supporters strengthened sandbag-and brick barricades in readiness for any action by security forces.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: Nasser Nouri/Flickr

9 Jul
Robert Siegel, Yasser El-Shimy

Muslim Brotherhood Has Long History in Egypt

Muslim Brotherhood Has Long History In Egypt | All Things Considered

Robert Siegel talks to Yasser El-Shimy, an Egypt and Middle East analyst for the International Crisis Group. He was formerly a diplomat at the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He talks about the history of the Muslim Brotherhood and its relationships with other Islamic groups in Egypt.

FULL ARTICLE (NPR)

29 plays
5 Apr
Egyptian laws, arrests worry liberals and the West | Reuters
By Tom Perry
The state prosecutor issued arrest warrants for five leading democracy activists accused of inciting violence, and separately summoned popular television satirist Bassem Youssef - Egypt’s answer to CNN “Daily Show” comic Jon Stewart - for questioning for allegedly insulting the president and Islam.
"The Brotherhood feel that they are besieged and encircled by many political forces around them - lately, the United States included," said Yasser El-Shimy, Egypt analyst with the International Crisis Group, a think-tank.
"I wouldn’t say there is a case of authoritarian retrenchment here but … the Brothers adopt a really strict view of democracy in which getting 50 percent-plus-one allows them to pretty much do as they please, and that is what they are doing," he said.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: Bora S. Kamel/Flickr

Egyptian laws, arrests worry liberals and the West | Reuters

By Tom Perry

The state prosecutor issued arrest warrants for five leading democracy activists accused of inciting violence, and separately summoned popular television satirist Bassem Youssef - Egypt’s answer to CNN “Daily Show” comic Jon Stewart - for questioning for allegedly insulting the president and Islam.

"The Brotherhood feel that they are besieged and encircled by many political forces around them - lately, the United States included," said Yasser El-Shimy, Egypt analyst with the International Crisis Group, a think-tank.

"I wouldn’t say there is a case of authoritarian retrenchment here but … the Brothers adopt a really strict view of democracy in which getting 50 percent-plus-one allows them to pretty much do as they please, and that is what they are doing," he said.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: Bora S. Kamel/Flickr

25 Mar
Mursi warning stirs fears in Egypt opposition | Reuters
By Tom Perry
Exactly what new steps Mursi is considering became the subject of speculation.
In late January, he declared a state of emergency rule in three cities near the Suez Canal to combat a wave of violence there. A declaration of a state of emergency elsewhere is unlikely, said Yasser El-Shimy, Egypt analyst for the International Crisis Group, adding arrests were more probable.
"My impression is that Mursi and the Brotherhood in general have had it with the violence that is taking place and they are running out of patience," he said.
"This is definitely the strictest he has spoken regarding the rioting," he added. "Now Mursi feels there is enough public opinion on his side to justify taking stricter measures."
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: whl.travel/Flickr

Mursi warning stirs fears in Egypt opposition | Reuters

By Tom Perry

Exactly what new steps Mursi is considering became the subject of speculation.

In late January, he declared a state of emergency rule in three cities near the Suez Canal to combat a wave of violence there. A declaration of a state of emergency elsewhere is unlikely, said Yasser El-Shimy, Egypt analyst for the International Crisis Group, adding arrests were more probable.

"My impression is that Mursi and the Brotherhood in general have had it with the violence that is taking place and they are running out of patience," he said.

"This is definitely the strictest he has spoken regarding the rioting," he added. "Now Mursi feels there is enough public opinion on his side to justify taking stricter measures."

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: whl.travel/Flickr

13 Feb
Israel’s Islamist dilemma | Times of Israel
By Ofer Zalzberg, Senior Middle East Analyst, and Robert Blecher, Arab-Israeli Project Director
The Arab uprisings could turn out to be no less fateful for Israel than for its neighbors. Will it seek new ways of engaging the region or will it continue to pay lip service to a peace process that it shows no interest in pursuing? The former sounds counter-intuitive: the Muslim Brotherhood hardly seems a suitable partner for any Israeli government – let alone a coalition led by a Likud that recent party primaries pushed to the right.
Though political Islamists theologically object to non-Muslim sovereignty over historic Palestine (which they see as holy Islamic patrimony), Egypt, Turkey and Qatar have demonstrated that at present they share Israel’s interest in regional stability and good relations with the West. This triumvirate of pro-U.S. Islamist governments, particularly Cairo, was instrumental in bringing Operation Pillar of Defense to an end on terms that were viewed favorably by many in Jerusalem. While few in Israel believe this bloc could be a strategic ally in building peace, the government increasingly is convinced that it could turn out to be a de facto partner in avoiding war.
The diplomatic posture of the Brotherhood, now that it is confronted by the demands of governing, could wind up being more flexible than anticipated. Some former and current Israeli officials argue that Israel should encourage this, for example by apologizing for killing nine Turks aboard a boat challenging the blockade of Gaza and by facilitating promised Qatari projects in Gaza. Some go further and call for pushing the limits of the Islamists’ theology by accepting Cairo’s desire to amend the military annex of the 1979 Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty, which would require the Brotherhood to endorse the revised text and in doing so, a final status peace agreement with Israel.
FULL ARTICLE (Times of Israel)
Photo: Israel Defense Forces/Flickr

Israel’s Islamist dilemma | Times of Israel

By Ofer Zalzberg, Senior Middle East Analyst, and Robert Blecher, Arab-Israeli Project Director

The Arab uprisings could turn out to be no less fateful for Israel than for its neighbors. Will it seek new ways of engaging the region or will it continue to pay lip service to a peace process that it shows no interest in pursuing? The former sounds counter-intuitive: the Muslim Brotherhood hardly seems a suitable partner for any Israeli government – let alone a coalition led by a Likud that recent party primaries pushed to the right.

Though political Islamists theologically object to non-Muslim sovereignty over historic Palestine (which they see as holy Islamic patrimony), Egypt, Turkey and Qatar have demonstrated that at present they share Israel’s interest in regional stability and good relations with the West. This triumvirate of pro-U.S. Islamist governments, particularly Cairo, was instrumental in bringing Operation Pillar of Defense to an end on terms that were viewed favorably by many in Jerusalem. While few in Israel believe this bloc could be a strategic ally in building peace, the government increasingly is convinced that it could turn out to be a de facto partner in avoiding war.

The diplomatic posture of the Brotherhood, now that it is confronted by the demands of governing, could wind up being more flexible than anticipated. Some former and current Israeli officials argue that Israel should encourage this, for example by apologizing for killing nine Turks aboard a boat challenging the blockade of Gaza and by facilitating promised Qatari projects in Gaza. Some go further and call for pushing the limits of the Islamists’ theology by accepting Cairo’s desire to amend the military annex of the 1979 Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty, which would require the Brotherhood to endorse the revised text and in doing so, a final status peace agreement with Israel.

FULL ARTICLE (Times of Israel)

Photo: Israel Defense Forces/Flickr