Showing posts tagged as "kenya"

Showing posts tagged kenya

9 Jul
Kenya’s Governors Seek Security Role | allAfrica
Recent gang attacks in western and northeastern Kenya have led to demands for the country’s new county governors to be given a greater role in maintaining security.
If governors were made responsible for maintaining security in their county, they might have powers to deploy police on the ground without first seeking permission from the force’s central command in the capital Nairobi.
FULL STORY (allAfrica)
Photo: DEMOSH/Flickr

Kenya’s Governors Seek Security Role | allAfrica

Recent gang attacks in western and northeastern Kenya have led to demands for the country’s new county governors to be given a greater role in maintaining security.

If governors were made responsible for maintaining security in their county, they might have powers to deploy police on the ground without first seeking permission from the force’s central command in the capital Nairobi.

FULL STORY (allAfrica)

Photo: DEMOSH/Flickr

15 May
Kenya After the Elections
Nairobi/Brussels  |   15 May 2013
Though the 2013 general elections were relatively peaceful, Kenya is still deeply divided and ethnically polarised.
Kenya After the Elections, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group,examines the 4 March elections that saw Jubilee Coalition’s Uhuru Kenyatta declared president. Despite various shortcomings and allegations of irregularities, Kenyans averted a repeat of the 2007-2008 post-election violence. However, the conflict drivers that triggered the 2007 bloodshed, including a culture of impunity, land grievances, corruption, ethnic tensions, weak institutions and regional and socio-economic inequality,have yet to be addressed adequately.
The briefing’s major findings and recommendations are:
The government needs to restore confidence in theelectoral machinery, which was undermined by technical failures in electronic voting and questions over the transparency of the tallying process.
Domestically, implementing devolution presents a crucial test, both in ensuring Kenya’s counties do not become “ethnic fiefdoms” and are inclusive of minority interests, and that they have adequate financial support despite the country’s current fiscal deficit.
Internationally, the new government will need to fully cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) as the cases against the new president and deputy president for their alleged roles in the 2007 election violence proceed. Failure to do so will strain international relations, to the detriment of Kenya’s economy and its people.
Despite the strength of the Jubilee Coalition in the legislatures, the opposition needs to regroup under strong leadership to represent fully the more than five million voters who supported it.
“Maintaining the status quo is simply not an option for a still divided Kenya”, says Cedric Barnes, Crisis Group’s Horn of Africa Project Director. “The ICC cases, a disappointed and bitter opposition and the implementation of an untested system of devolved governance remain significant challenges for the new government”.
“The new government has the opportunity to usher in an era of peace and socio-economic development that would benefit all communities and unite the country”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Deputy Director. “The foundation has been laid with the overwhelming support the constitution received in 2010, a base that should be maintained and built upon for a peaceful and prosperous future”.
FULL BRIEFING

Kenya After the Elections

Nairobi/Brussels  |   15 May 2013

Though the 2013 general elections were relatively peaceful, Kenya is still deeply divided and ethnically polarised.

Kenya After the Elections, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group,examines the 4 March elections that saw Jubilee Coalition’s Uhuru Kenyatta declared president. Despite various shortcomings and allegations of irregularities, Kenyans averted a repeat of the 2007-2008 post-election violence. However, the conflict drivers that triggered the 2007 bloodshed, including a culture of impunity, land grievances, corruption, ethnic tensions, weak institutions and regional and socio-economic inequality,have yet to be addressed adequately.

The briefing’s major findings and recommendations are:

  • The government needs to restore confidence in theelectoral machinery, which was undermined by technical failures in electronic voting and questions over the transparency of the tallying process.
  • Domestically, implementing devolution presents a crucial test, both in ensuring Kenya’s counties do not become “ethnic fiefdoms” and are inclusive of minority interests, and that they have adequate financial support despite the country’s current fiscal deficit.
  • Internationally, the new government will need to fully cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) as the cases against the new president and deputy president for their alleged roles in the 2007 election violence proceed. Failure to do so will strain international relations, to the detriment of Kenya’s economy and its people.
  • Despite the strength of the Jubilee Coalition in the legislatures, the opposition needs to regroup under strong leadership to represent fully the more than five million voters who supported it.

“Maintaining the status quo is simply not an option for a still divided Kenya”, says Cedric Barnes, Crisis Group’s Horn of Africa Project Director. “The ICC cases, a disappointed and bitter opposition and the implementation of an untested system of devolved governance remain significant challenges for the new government”.

“The new government has the opportunity to usher in an era of peace and socio-economic development that would benefit all communities and unite the country”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Deputy Director. “The foundation has been laid with the overwhelming support the constitution received in 2010, a base that should be maintained and built upon for a peaceful and prosperous future”.

FULL BRIEFING

5 Apr
Interview with E.J. Hogendoorn, International Crisis Group, on Kenya’s Elections | The Global Observatory
By John Hirsch
Kenya’s peaceful March 4 elections was the result of hard work by both the Kenyans and the international community, said E.J. Hogendoorn, the deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group (ICG), though there is much that can be improved in the voting process.
"I think that to some degree the elections have been a success because they have been peaceful; they have not really been a success in terms of how they were logistically implemented," said Mr. Hogendoorn.
"There are lots and lots of problems with the modernization of the election process: the creation of a biometric voter registration system, the electronic commission of results completely collapsed, and the electoral board was forced to go back to paper balloting, and so on and so forth," he said.
"But given that, I think the general lessons are that preparations always need to be taken deliberately and to be given a great deal of lead-time, and people need to be very careful that any slippage of the preparations in an electoral campaign can create a lot of confusion and lead to tension."
FULL ARTICLE (The Global Observatory)
Photo: Flickr/ILRI

Interview with E.J. Hogendoorn, International Crisis Group, on Kenya’s Elections | The Global Observatory

By John Hirsch

Kenya’s peaceful March 4 elections was the result of hard work by both the Kenyans and the international community, said E.J. Hogendoorn, the deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group (ICG), though there is much that can be improved in the voting process.

"I think that to some degree the elections have been a success because they have been peaceful; they have not really been a success in terms of how they were logistically implemented," said Mr. Hogendoorn.

"There are lots and lots of problems with the modernization of the election process: the creation of a biometric voter registration system, the electronic commission of results completely collapsed, and the electoral board was forced to go back to paper balloting, and so on and so forth," he said.

"But given that, I think the general lessons are that preparations always need to be taken deliberately and to be given a great deal of lead-time, and people need to be very careful that any slippage of the preparations in an electoral campaign can create a lot of confusion and lead to tension."

FULL ARTICLE (The Global Observatory)

Photo: Flickr/ILRI

27 Feb

Memories of Violence Haunt Upcoming Presidential Election in Kenya | PBS Newshour

After the disputed presidential election of December 2007, Kenya fell into chaos as neighbors from different tribal ethnic groups turned on each other in violence. Five years later, Kenyans are worried that history may repeat itself as they prepare for new elections. Special correspondent Kira Kay reports.

PBS Newshour

Watch our Africa Program Director, Comfort Ero, speak on Kenya’s upcoming elections and the risk of violence like that which followed elections in 2007-08. Crisis Group published a recent report on the issue.

24 Jan
Analysts: Political Party Polls in Kenya a Failure | AP via ABC News
By Tom Odula
Political party primaries to select candidates for Kenya’s March national elections have been fraught with irregularities, disorganization and disgruntled losers, increasing the chances of conflict during the upcoming vote, analysts said Friday.
FULL ARTICLE (AP via ABC News)
Photo: openDemocracy/Flickr

Analysts: Political Party Polls in Kenya a Failure | AP via ABC News

By Tom Odula

Political party primaries to select candidates for Kenya’s March national elections have been fraught with irregularities, disorganization and disgruntled losers, increasing the chances of conflict during the upcoming vote, analysts said Friday.

FULL ARTICLE (AP via ABC News)

Photo: openDemocracy/Flickr

22 Jan
Uhuru and Ruto may be impeached - ICG report |  The Star via allAfrica
By Walter Menya
UHURU Kenyatta and William Ruto face a possible impeachment if they become president and deputy president after the election, according to the International Crisis Group.
The report entitled Kenya’s 2013 Elections warns of irreparable economic damage if Uhuru and Ruto win the March 4 polls.
FULL ARTICLE (The Star via allAfrica)
Photo: International Monetary Fund/Flickr

Uhuru and Ruto may be impeached - ICG report |  The Star via allAfrica

By Walter Menya

UHURU Kenyatta and William Ruto face a possible impeachment if they become president and deputy president after the election, according to the International Crisis Group.

The report entitled Kenya’s 2013 Elections warns of irreparable economic damage if Uhuru and Ruto win the March 4 polls.

FULL ARTICLE (The Star via allAfrica)

Photo: International Monetary Fund/Flickr

17 Jan
"Youth unemployment is still very high and, together with poverty and inequality, means a steady flow of recruits for criminal groups and militias that can be mobilised to intimidate opponents and their supporters or protest results"

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Kenya’s 2013 Elections

"The people deserve better. To put the horror of five years ago behind them, they deserve the chance to vote without fear and elect leaders committed to reform and ready to serve society as a whole rather than the narrow interests of its elites."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Kenya’s 2013 Elections

"A president facing lengthy trial before the ICC could potentially have extremely damaging implications for reform and foreign relations."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Kenya’s 2013 Elections

"Kenya’s elections this year should turn the page on the bloodshed of five years ago, but the risk of political violence is still unacceptably high. A new constitution, fresh election commission and reformed judiciary should help. But the vote, now set for 4 March 2013, will still be a high-stakes competition for power."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Kenya’s 2013 Elections