Showing posts tagged as "kenya"

Showing posts tagged kenya

12 Nov
"Indeed, thanks to some canny framing of the issue, the ICC indictment proved to be what Bryan Kahumbura, a Horn of Africa Analyst at the International Crisis Group (ICG), has termed a ‘fortunate misfortune.’"

ThinkAfrica Press

25 Sep
Kenya Attack Unfolded In Up and Down Twitter Feeds | Lori Hinnant
As the deadly attack unfolded inside Kenya’s Westgate mall, the militants who claimed responsibility for the spreading mayhem sent out tweet after tweet, taunting the Kenyan military, defending the mass killings and threatening more bloodshed.
Each time Twitter shut the account down — a total of five times, according to a U.S.-based security analyst — al-Shabab started a new feed. The sixth account included a post on Tuesday linking to a photo that purported to be two of the attackers “unruffled and strolling around the mall in such sangfroid manner” and mocking Kenya’s security forces for their repeated assurances over two days — also tweeted — that the siege was nearly over.
FULL ARTICLE (AP) 
Photo: Johan Larsson/Flickr

Kenya Attack Unfolded In Up and Down Twitter Feeds | Lori Hinnant

As the deadly attack unfolded inside Kenya’s Westgate mall, the militants who claimed responsibility for the spreading mayhem sent out tweet after tweet, taunting the Kenyan military, defending the mass killings and threatening more bloodshed.

Each time Twitter shut the account down — a total of five times, according to a U.S.-based security analyst — al-Shabab started a new feed. The sixth account included a post on Tuesday linking to a photo that purported to be two of the attackers “unruffled and strolling around the mall in such sangfroid manner” and mocking Kenya’s security forces for their repeated assurances over two days — also tweeted — that the siege was nearly over.

FULL ARTICLE (AP) 

Photo: Johan Larsson/Flickr

Kenyan officials say Nairobi mall siege is over; attack may bolster al-Shabab in jihadists’ eyes | Sudarsan Raghavan
The bloody siege of an upscale mall by Islamist militants ended Tuesday with five of the attackers dead and 11 taken into custody, amid fears that the death toll of more than 60 civilians could substantially rise when authorities begin searching through the wreckage.
“As a nation, our head is bloodied but unbowed,” Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said in a televised address, declaring three days of mourning. “We have ashamed and defeated our attackers.”
FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)
Photo: Uhuru Kenyatta/Flickr

Kenyan officials say Nairobi mall siege is over; attack may bolster al-Shabab in jihadists’ eyes | Sudarsan Raghavan

The bloody siege of an upscale mall by Islamist militants ended Tuesday with five of the attackers dead and 11 taken into custody, amid fears that the death toll of more than 60 civilians could substantially rise when authorities begin searching through the wreckage.

“As a nation, our head is bloodied but unbowed,” Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said in a televised address, declaring three days of mourning. “We have ashamed and defeated our attackers.”

FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)

Photo: Uhuru Kenyatta/Flickr

Kenya’s Brutal Coming of Age | Cedric Barnes
The terrorist attack on the Westgate Mall, in the center of this increasingly prosperous — for some at least — capital, is a cruelly ironic indicator of the arrival of Kenya as a serious regional power, a hub for international business and diplomacy, and a target for international Islamic armed radicals.
Even more so than the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies here and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, the deadly mall attack — a four-day siege that began on Saturday and resulted in at least 60 deaths — is a reminder of Kenya’s coming of age. It heralds a difficult period for a country waging a war that is at once beyond its borders and very close to home.
FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)
Photo: United States Marine Corps/Wikimedia Commons

Kenya’s Brutal Coming of Age | Cedric Barnes

The terrorist attack on the Westgate Mall, in the center of this increasingly prosperous — for some at least — capital, is a cruelly ironic indicator of the arrival of Kenya as a serious regional power, a hub for international business and diplomacy, and a target for international Islamic armed radicals.

Even more so than the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies here and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, the deadly mall attack — a four-day siege that began on Saturday and resulted in at least 60 deaths — is a reminder of Kenya’s coming of age. It heralds a difficult period for a country waging a war that is at once beyond its borders and very close to home.

FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)

Photo: United States Marine Corps/Wikimedia Commons

23 Sep
'This is not Kenya's war' | James Reinl
When she heard the first crackle of shots, Fiona Herbert thought she was listening to fireworks, rather than the bullets that signalled the start of a bloody siege on an upmarket shopping mall here in Kenya’s capital.
The 34-year-old Briton, who lives in Kenya, described chaotic scenes as she grabbed her baby son and darted out of the ground-floor cafe, fleeing with other shoppers into a furniture shop, jamming a chair behind the door and ducking into a store room.
Outside, around a dozen masked attackers tossed grenades and shot shoppers in the head, using pistols and assault rifles, ostensibly to advance the cause of al-Shabaab, an armed Somali outfit with links to al-Qaeda and ambitions to topple their country’s UN-backed government.
FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera English) 
Photo: hktang/Flickr

'This is not Kenya's war' | James Reinl

When she heard the first crackle of shots, Fiona Herbert thought she was listening to fireworks, rather than the bullets that signalled the start of a bloody siege on an upmarket shopping mall here in Kenya’s capital.

The 34-year-old Briton, who lives in Kenya, described chaotic scenes as she grabbed her baby son and darted out of the ground-floor cafe, fleeing with other shoppers into a furniture shop, jamming a chair behind the door and ducking into a store room.

Outside, around a dozen masked attackers tossed grenades and shot shoppers in the head, using pistols and assault rifles, ostensibly to advance the cause of al-Shabaab, an armed Somali outfit with links to al-Qaeda and ambitions to topple their country’s UN-backed government.

FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera English) 

Photo: hktang/Flickr

Nairobi attack, “Kenyan-grown plot” | Radio France Internationale

Somalia’s Shebab insurgents have claimed responsibility for the attack in Nairobi. But Kenyan army chief Julius Karangi has said the gunmen were of different nationalities. Many foreign fighters, including Somalis with dual citizenships are members of the Shebab. But analyst Cedric Barnes, the Horn of Africa director of the International Crisis Group, says the siege of the Westgate mall bears the hallmarks of al Qaeda. He spoke to RFI’s Nicolas Champeaux. 

FULL INTERVIEW (Radio France Internationale)

9 Jul
Kenya’s Governors Seek Security Role | allAfrica
Recent gang attacks in western and northeastern Kenya have led to demands for the country’s new county governors to be given a greater role in maintaining security.
If governors were made responsible for maintaining security in their county, they might have powers to deploy police on the ground without first seeking permission from the force’s central command in the capital Nairobi.
FULL STORY (allAfrica)
Photo: DEMOSH/Flickr

Kenya’s Governors Seek Security Role | allAfrica

Recent gang attacks in western and northeastern Kenya have led to demands for the country’s new county governors to be given a greater role in maintaining security.

If governors were made responsible for maintaining security in their county, they might have powers to deploy police on the ground without first seeking permission from the force’s central command in the capital Nairobi.

FULL STORY (allAfrica)

Photo: DEMOSH/Flickr

15 May
Kenya After the Elections
Nairobi/Brussels  |   15 May 2013
Though the 2013 general elections were relatively peaceful, Kenya is still deeply divided and ethnically polarised.
Kenya After the Elections, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group,examines the 4 March elections that saw Jubilee Coalition’s Uhuru Kenyatta declared president. Despite various shortcomings and allegations of irregularities, Kenyans averted a repeat of the 2007-2008 post-election violence. However, the conflict drivers that triggered the 2007 bloodshed, including a culture of impunity, land grievances, corruption, ethnic tensions, weak institutions and regional and socio-economic inequality,have yet to be addressed adequately.
The briefing’s major findings and recommendations are:
The government needs to restore confidence in theelectoral machinery, which was undermined by technical failures in electronic voting and questions over the transparency of the tallying process.
Domestically, implementing devolution presents a crucial test, both in ensuring Kenya’s counties do not become “ethnic fiefdoms” and are inclusive of minority interests, and that they have adequate financial support despite the country’s current fiscal deficit.
Internationally, the new government will need to fully cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) as the cases against the new president and deputy president for their alleged roles in the 2007 election violence proceed. Failure to do so will strain international relations, to the detriment of Kenya’s economy and its people.
Despite the strength of the Jubilee Coalition in the legislatures, the opposition needs to regroup under strong leadership to represent fully the more than five million voters who supported it.
“Maintaining the status quo is simply not an option for a still divided Kenya”, says Cedric Barnes, Crisis Group’s Horn of Africa Project Director. “The ICC cases, a disappointed and bitter opposition and the implementation of an untested system of devolved governance remain significant challenges for the new government”.
“The new government has the opportunity to usher in an era of peace and socio-economic development that would benefit all communities and unite the country”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Deputy Director. “The foundation has been laid with the overwhelming support the constitution received in 2010, a base that should be maintained and built upon for a peaceful and prosperous future”.
FULL BRIEFING

Kenya After the Elections

Nairobi/Brussels  |   15 May 2013

Though the 2013 general elections were relatively peaceful, Kenya is still deeply divided and ethnically polarised.

Kenya After the Elections, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group,examines the 4 March elections that saw Jubilee Coalition’s Uhuru Kenyatta declared president. Despite various shortcomings and allegations of irregularities, Kenyans averted a repeat of the 2007-2008 post-election violence. However, the conflict drivers that triggered the 2007 bloodshed, including a culture of impunity, land grievances, corruption, ethnic tensions, weak institutions and regional and socio-economic inequality,have yet to be addressed adequately.

The briefing’s major findings and recommendations are:

  • The government needs to restore confidence in theelectoral machinery, which was undermined by technical failures in electronic voting and questions over the transparency of the tallying process.
  • Domestically, implementing devolution presents a crucial test, both in ensuring Kenya’s counties do not become “ethnic fiefdoms” and are inclusive of minority interests, and that they have adequate financial support despite the country’s current fiscal deficit.
  • Internationally, the new government will need to fully cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) as the cases against the new president and deputy president for their alleged roles in the 2007 election violence proceed. Failure to do so will strain international relations, to the detriment of Kenya’s economy and its people.
  • Despite the strength of the Jubilee Coalition in the legislatures, the opposition needs to regroup under strong leadership to represent fully the more than five million voters who supported it.

“Maintaining the status quo is simply not an option for a still divided Kenya”, says Cedric Barnes, Crisis Group’s Horn of Africa Project Director. “The ICC cases, a disappointed and bitter opposition and the implementation of an untested system of devolved governance remain significant challenges for the new government”.

“The new government has the opportunity to usher in an era of peace and socio-economic development that would benefit all communities and unite the country”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Deputy Director. “The foundation has been laid with the overwhelming support the constitution received in 2010, a base that should be maintained and built upon for a peaceful and prosperous future”.

FULL BRIEFING

5 Apr
Interview with E.J. Hogendoorn, International Crisis Group, on Kenya’s Elections | The Global Observatory
By John Hirsch
Kenya’s peaceful March 4 elections was the result of hard work by both the Kenyans and the international community, said E.J. Hogendoorn, the deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group (ICG), though there is much that can be improved in the voting process.
"I think that to some degree the elections have been a success because they have been peaceful; they have not really been a success in terms of how they were logistically implemented," said Mr. Hogendoorn.
"There are lots and lots of problems with the modernization of the election process: the creation of a biometric voter registration system, the electronic commission of results completely collapsed, and the electoral board was forced to go back to paper balloting, and so on and so forth," he said.
"But given that, I think the general lessons are that preparations always need to be taken deliberately and to be given a great deal of lead-time, and people need to be very careful that any slippage of the preparations in an electoral campaign can create a lot of confusion and lead to tension."
FULL ARTICLE (The Global Observatory)
Photo: Flickr/ILRI

Interview with E.J. Hogendoorn, International Crisis Group, on Kenya’s Elections | The Global Observatory

By John Hirsch

Kenya’s peaceful March 4 elections was the result of hard work by both the Kenyans and the international community, said E.J. Hogendoorn, the deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group (ICG), though there is much that can be improved in the voting process.

"I think that to some degree the elections have been a success because they have been peaceful; they have not really been a success in terms of how they were logistically implemented," said Mr. Hogendoorn.

"There are lots and lots of problems with the modernization of the election process: the creation of a biometric voter registration system, the electronic commission of results completely collapsed, and the electoral board was forced to go back to paper balloting, and so on and so forth," he said.

"But given that, I think the general lessons are that preparations always need to be taken deliberately and to be given a great deal of lead-time, and people need to be very careful that any slippage of the preparations in an electoral campaign can create a lot of confusion and lead to tension."

FULL ARTICLE (The Global Observatory)

Photo: Flickr/ILRI

27 Feb

Memories of Violence Haunt Upcoming Presidential Election in Kenya | PBS Newshour

After the disputed presidential election of December 2007, Kenya fell into chaos as neighbors from different tribal ethnic groups turned on each other in violence. Five years later, Kenyans are worried that history may repeat itself as they prepare for new elections. Special correspondent Kira Kay reports.

PBS Newshour

Watch our Africa Program Director, Comfort Ero, speak on Kenya’s upcoming elections and the risk of violence like that which followed elections in 2007-08. Crisis Group published a recent report on the issue.