Showing posts tagged as "jordan"

Showing posts tagged jordan

7 Nov
Syrian war refugees find crowds, crime, contagion at camps | Ashish Sen
Kilian Kleinschmidt, a hardened veteran of international humanitarian crises, finds it too painful to listen to the stories of death and destruction from refugees fleeing Syria’s relentless civil war, as they flood across the border to a crowded camp in northern Jordan.
“I am avoiding talking to people who come in as much as possible because the stories are horrendous,” Mr. Kleinschmidt, who runs the Zaatari camp for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said in a phone interview from Jordan.
FULL ARTICLE (Washington Times) 
Photo: Oxfam International/Flickr

Syrian war refugees find crowds, crime, contagion at camps | Ashish Sen

Kilian Kleinschmidt, a hardened veteran of international humanitarian crises, finds it too painful to listen to the stories of death and destruction from refugees fleeing Syria’s relentless civil war, as they flood across the border to a crowded camp in northern Jordan.

“I am avoiding talking to people who come in as much as possible because the stories are horrendous,” Mr. Kleinschmidt, who runs the Zaatari camp for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said in a phone interview from Jordan.

FULL ARTICLE (Washington Times) 

Photo: Oxfam International/Flickr

9 Sep
Heed Syria refugee crisis: Column | Lionel Beehner
The aerial footage of the Zaatari camp near Syria’s border with Jordan — row upon dusty row of squat trailers and tents as far as the eye can see, like a desert version of Oz — could become the iconic image of this war, along with photos of children gassed outside Damascus.
While the images of the chemical attacks capture the inhumanity of this conflict, the aerial shots of the camp capture the scale. More than 2 million Syrians have fled the war, half of them children, making it the world’s worst refugee crisis since Rwanda’s 1994 genocide. Left unaddressed, the crisis risks destabilizing Syria’s neighbors and disposing any hope of instilling peace and democracy in the region.
FULL ARTICLE (USA Today)
Photo: Freedom House/Flickr

Heed Syria refugee crisis: Column | Lionel Beehner

The aerial footage of the Zaatari camp near Syria’s border with Jordan — row upon dusty row of squat trailers and tents as far as the eye can see, like a desert version of Oz — could become the iconic image of this war, along with photos of children gassed outside Damascus.

While the images of the chemical attacks capture the inhumanity of this conflict, the aerial shots of the camp capture the scale. More than 2 million Syrians have fled the war, half of them children, making it the world’s worst refugee crisis since Rwanda’s 1994 genocide. Left unaddressed, the crisis risks destabilizing Syria’s neighbors and disposing any hope of instilling peace and democracy in the region.

FULL ARTICLE (USA Today)

Photo: Freedom House/Flickr

15 Aug
Robert Blecher | الأردن: فرصة العودة إلى الإصلاح
المثل القائل إن مصائب قوم عند قوم فوائد ينطبق على الحال الأردنية، ويفسر هذا المثل سبب كون هذه السنة سنة جيدة، بل وقد يكون هذا الشهر الأفضل بالنسبة الى الحكم في عمان. فلا تظهر كل من الحرب الأهلية في سورية ولا الاضطرابات في مصر أية إشارة الى انحسارهما في القريب العاجل. وموجة الطائفية آخذة في الارتفاع، والمعارضة الأردنية المتشظية تفتقر إلى الرؤية الصائبة، والأحداث الإقليمية قسمت الأردن على نفسه. فمنذ اعتلاء الملك عبدالله الثاني العرش، نادراً ما كان موقفه أقوى وموقف المعارضة أضعف مما هما عليه اليوم. فكيف سيستفيد الحكم من هذه الفرصة السانحة؟ وهل سيفعل ما يجب فعله: إعادة إحياء وتسريع جدول الأعمال الإصلاحي؟
FULL ARTICLE (Al-Hayat) 
Photo: oliverlaumann/Flickr

Robert Blecher | الأردن: فرصة العودة إلى الإصلاح

المثل القائل إن مصائب قوم عند قوم فوائد ينطبق على الحال الأردنية، ويفسر هذا المثل سبب كون هذه السنة سنة جيدة، بل وقد يكون هذا الشهر الأفضل بالنسبة الى الحكم في عمان. فلا تظهر كل من الحرب الأهلية في سورية ولا الاضطرابات في مصر أية إشارة الى انحسارهما في القريب العاجل. وموجة الطائفية آخذة في الارتفاع، والمعارضة الأردنية المتشظية تفتقر إلى الرؤية الصائبة، والأحداث الإقليمية قسمت الأردن على نفسه. فمنذ اعتلاء الملك عبدالله الثاني العرش، نادراً ما كان موقفه أقوى وموقف المعارضة أضعف مما هما عليه اليوم. فكيف سيستفيد الحكم من هذه الفرصة السانحة؟ وهل سيفعل ما يجب فعله: إعادة إحياء وتسريع جدول الأعمال الإصلاحي؟

FULL ARTICLE (Al-Hayat) 

Photo: oliverlaumann/Flickr

22 Jul
The Arab Spring is just getting started | David Rohde
After the Egyptian army toppled President Mohammed Morsi, a member of the U.S. Congress expressed the sentiment of many in Washington.
“The army is the only stable institution in the country,” he said.
In the Western media, Arab Spring post-mortems proliferated, including a 15-page special report in The Economist that asked, “Has the Arab Spring failed?” The answer: “That view is at best premature, at worst wrong.”
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: Charles Roffey/Flickr

The Arab Spring is just getting started | David Rohde

After the Egyptian army toppled President Mohammed Morsi, a member of the U.S. Congress expressed the sentiment of many in Washington.

“The army is the only stable institution in the country,” he said.

In the Western media, Arab Spring post-mortems proliferated, including a 15-page special report in The Economist that asked, “Has the Arab Spring failed?” The answer: “That view is at best premature, at worst wrong.”

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: Charles Roffey/Flickr

15 Nov
Riots Erupt Across Jordan Over Gas Prices | The New York Times
By Jodi Rudoren
JERUSALEM — Violent protests broke out across Jordan on Tuesday night after the government announced an increase in fuel prices, inciting what appeared to be an unparalleled show of anger directed at the king after months of mounting tension in the strategically important and politically fragile kingdom.
Demonstrators burned tires, smashed traffic lights and blocked roads in several Jordanian cities. Riot police officers tried to quell some of the crowds with tear gas. There were calls for a general strike on Wednesday.
FULL ARTICLE (The New York Times)
Photo: Kaj17/Flickr

Riots Erupt Across Jordan Over Gas Prices | The New York Times

By Jodi Rudoren

JERUSALEM — Violent protests broke out across Jordan on Tuesday night after the government announced an increase in fuel prices, inciting what appeared to be an unparalleled show of anger directed at the king after months of mounting tension in the strategically important and politically fragile kingdom.

Demonstrators burned tires, smashed traffic lights and blocked roads in several Jordanian cities. Riot police officers tried to quell some of the crowds with tear gas. There were calls for a general strike on Wednesday.

FULL ARTICLE (The New York Times)

Photo: Kaj17/Flickr

6 Aug
"Defections are occurring in all components of the regime save its hard inner core, which for now has given no signs of fracturing."

— Peter Harling in the Reuters article Syria premier defects to anti-Assad opposition

9 May
BBC | Jordan’s king under pressure as reforms stall
Pressure is mounting on King Abdullah of Jordan, a key US ally, to respond to similar popular demands that have turned the Middle East upside down over the past year-and-a-half.
Promised political and economic reforms appear to be stalling. Last week, King Abdullah appointed his fourth prime minister since the Arab Spring started here 17 months ago.
Protests erupted in the impoverished countryside south of the capital, Amman, last year before the uprisings which overthrew the presidents of Tunisia and Egypt.
While demonstrations have been generally smaller and more peaceful than elsewhere in the region, Jordanians have been pressing for greater political say - specifically the popular election of prime ministers - and demanding government corruption and unemployment be tackled.
The official unemployment rate stands at 11.4%, while unofficial estimates put it at 22%.
The rhetoric has also developed in restive areas, like Tafileh in the south, from calls for reform to calls for regime change.
Although the country has so far managed to weather the political turbulence of the Arab Spring that has seen other countries’ presidents ousted, time is now a premium for the king, who has shown a penchant for deflecting criticism about policies by firing prime ministers.
FULL ARTICLE (BBC)

BBC | Jordan’s king under pressure as reforms stall

Pressure is mounting on King Abdullah of Jordan, a key US ally, to respond to similar popular demands that have turned the Middle East upside down over the past year-and-a-half.

Promised political and economic reforms appear to be stalling. Last week, King Abdullah appointed his fourth prime minister since the Arab Spring started here 17 months ago.

Protests erupted in the impoverished countryside south of the capital, Amman, last year before the uprisings which overthrew the presidents of Tunisia and Egypt.

While demonstrations have been generally smaller and more peaceful than elsewhere in the region, Jordanians have been pressing for greater political say - specifically the popular election of prime ministers - and demanding government corruption and unemployment be tackled.

The official unemployment rate stands at 11.4%, while unofficial estimates put it at 22%.

The rhetoric has also developed in restive areas, like Tafileh in the south, from calls for reform to calls for regime change.

Although the country has so far managed to weather the political turbulence of the Arab Spring that has seen other countries’ presidents ousted, time is now a premium for the king, who has shown a penchant for deflecting criticism about policies by firing prime ministers.

FULL ARTICLE (BBC)

30 Apr
TIME | A Prime Minister Resigns in Jordan, and the Sun Rises in the East
The news out of Jordan almost does not qualify as news:  Prime Minister Awn Khasawneh resigned Thursday. It happened all of a sudden and without explanation, but it’s something that happens so frequently in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan that his successor, Fayez al-Tarawneh, is the fourth person to hold the office in the space of 14 months.
In fact, he’s held the very same office before. Al-Tarawneh also headed the government in the late 1990s, serving then, as now, entirely at the pleasure of King Abdullah II, the embattled monarch who shuffles the place cards whenever his subjects show signs of growing too restive for comfort.  The maneuvering has been identifiable as farce years for a while now — frenzied activity in a palace hallway, frantic opening and slamming of doors, familiar figures popping in and out of places they weren’t a few moments earlier, all the while trying to look distinguished. The whole cast showed up for a curtain call Jan. 8 when His Majesty summoned a baker’s dozen of one-time premiers to Amman. The occasion was a group consultation on how best to move forward with “reforms,” the thing Abdullah has been promising since he assumed the throne 13 years ago. But the effect edged into the hilarious, the photo spread the next day in the in the Jordan Times resembling nothing so much as early animation, the king greeting a series of business-suited men in a kind of flip-book where actual movement is of course only an illusion.
FULL ARTICLE (TIME)

TIME | A Prime Minister Resigns in Jordan, and the Sun Rises in the East

The news out of Jordan almost does not qualify as news:  Prime Minister Awn Khasawneh resigned Thursday. It happened all of a sudden and without explanation, but it’s something that happens so frequently in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan that his successor, Fayez al-Tarawneh, is the fourth person to hold the office in the space of 14 months.

In fact, he’s held the very same office before. Al-Tarawneh also headed the government in the late 1990s, serving then, as now, entirely at the pleasure of King Abdullah II, the embattled monarch who shuffles the place cards whenever his subjects show signs of growing too restive for comfort.  The maneuvering has been identifiable as farce years for a while now — frenzied activity in a palace hallway, frantic opening and slamming of doors, familiar figures popping in and out of places they weren’t a few moments earlier, all the while trying to look distinguished. The whole cast showed up for a curtain call Jan. 8 when His Majesty summoned a baker’s dozen of one-time premiers to Amman. The occasion was a group consultation on how best to move forward with “reforms,” the thing Abdullah has been promising since he assumed the throne 13 years ago. But the effect edged into the hilarious, the photo spread the next day in the in the Jordan Times resembling nothing so much as early animation, the king greeting a series of business-suited men in a kind of flip-book where actual movement is of course only an illusion.

FULL ARTICLE (TIME)

26 Apr
The Guardian | Jordan’s prime minister quits suddenly
King Abdullah accused of avoiding reforms and using politicians as ‘buffers to absorb discontent’ after third prime minister goes
Jordan’s efforts to maintain stability in the face of the turbulence of the Arab spring suffered a new blow on Thursday when the prime minister resigned – the third time this has happened in the last 18 months.
Awn Khasawneh submitted his resignation without warning after six months in office following a backlash against proposed electoral reforms in the western-backed kingdom that were seen by critics as an assault on civil liberties. A statement from the royal palace said the resignation had been accepted, without elaboration.
His replacement is Fayez al-Tarawneh, who was prime minister in the late 1990s. Jordanian responses to the news suggested it would not be seen as a significant change.
In his public appearances, King Abdullah has acknowledged pressure for reform in the spirit of protests across the Middle East and north Africabut he has been widely criticised for failing to set a timetable to allow the formation of governments based on a parliamentary majority.
Over the past 15 months Jordanian demonstrators have demanded political and economic changes, official accountability and an end to corruption.
FULL ARTICLE (The Guardian) 

The Guardian | Jordan’s prime minister quits suddenly

King Abdullah accused of avoiding reforms and using politicians as ‘buffers to absorb discontent’ after third prime minister goes

Jordan’s efforts to maintain stability in the face of the turbulence of the Arab spring suffered a new blow on Thursday when the prime minister resigned – the third time this has happened in the last 18 months.

Awn Khasawneh submitted his resignation without warning after six months in office following a backlash against proposed electoral reforms in the western-backed kingdom that were seen by critics as an assault on civil liberties. A statement from the royal palace said the resignation had been accepted, without elaboration.

His replacement is Fayez al-Tarawneh, who was prime minister in the late 1990s. Jordanian responses to the news suggested it would not be seen as a significant change.

In his public appearances, King Abdullah has acknowledged pressure for reform in the spirit of protests across the Middle East and north Africabut he has been widely criticised for failing to set a timetable to allow the formation of governments based on a parliamentary majority.

Over the past 15 months Jordanian demonstrators have demanded political and economic changes, official accountability and an end to corruption.

FULL ARTICLE (The Guardian)