Showing posts tagged as "iraq"

Showing posts tagged iraq

6 Mar
LINK

Inside the Middle East: Q&A with Maria Fantappie

Maria Fantappie, Crisis Group’s Iraq Analyst, discusses the situation in Iraq with Jennifer Rowland of Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

3 Feb
Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

29 Jan
Kurdish oil flow raises the stakes for Maliki | Justin Vela
Nouri Al Maliki may have to soften his opposition to a new Kurdish oil pipeline if he wants Iraqi Kurds to support him for a third term as Iraq’s prime minister.
Running from the Taq-Taq oilfield in the autonomous territory ruled by Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) to the border with Turkey, the pipeline allows Iraq’s Kurds to sell their oil on international markets independently of Baghdad.
Oil began flowing through the pipeline in early January, a move that infuriated the central government, which wants control over all energy exports.
But a general election scheduled for April 30 gives the Kurds the political leverage to extract concessions from Mr Al Maliki, since he is likely to need their support to continue in office.
FULL ARTICLE (The National)
Photo: Al Jazeera English/flickr

Kurdish oil flow raises the stakes for Maliki | Justin Vela

Nouri Al Maliki may have to soften his opposition to a new Kurdish oil pipeline if he wants Iraqi Kurds to support him for a third term as Iraq’s prime minister.

Running from the Taq-Taq oilfield in the autonomous territory ruled by Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) to the border with Turkey, the pipeline allows Iraq’s Kurds to sell their oil on international markets independently of Baghdad.

Oil began flowing through the pipeline in early January, a move that infuriated the central government, which wants control over all energy exports.

But a general election scheduled for April 30 gives the Kurds the political leverage to extract concessions from Mr Al Maliki, since he is likely to need their support to continue in office.

FULL ARTICLE (The National)

Photo: Al Jazeera English/flickr

10 Jan
US should aid Iraq’s Maliki, but conditions must apply | Boston Globe
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki bears much of the blame for the current crisis in Iraq. His decision to arrest Ahmed al-Alwani, a powerful Sunni member of parliament, on Dec. 28 inflamed the Sunni population. Alwani had accused Maliki, a Shiite, of treating Sunnis like second-class citizens and had assembled a crowd of protesters. Maliki’s crackdown, which included a raid on Alwani’s house that killed his brother, caused a predictable backlash. Many Sunni leaders, long disillusioned with Maliki’s rule, called for the central government to be expelled from a Sunni province. Amid the popular anger, Al Qaeda-linked fighters in neighboring Syria saw an opportunity. They streamed into the Iraqi cities of Fallujah and Ramadi and declared themselves in charge.
FULL ARTICLE (Boston Globe)
Photo: Truth Out/flickr

US should aid Iraq’s Maliki, but conditions must apply | Boston Globe

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki bears much of the blame for the current crisis in Iraq. His decision to arrest Ahmed al-Alwani, a powerful Sunni member of parliament, on Dec. 28 inflamed the Sunni population. Alwani had accused Maliki, a Shiite, of treating Sunnis like second-class citizens and had assembled a crowd of protesters. Maliki’s crackdown, which included a raid on Alwani’s house that killed his brother, caused a predictable backlash. Many Sunni leaders, long disillusioned with Maliki’s rule, called for the central government to be expelled from a Sunni province. Amid the popular anger, Al Qaeda-linked fighters in neighboring Syria saw an opportunity. They streamed into the Iraqi cities of Fallujah and Ramadi and declared themselves in charge.

FULL ARTICLE (Boston Globe)

Photo: Truth Out/flickr

7 Jan
Maria Fantappie

Al-Qaida's New Rise In The Middle East

Maria Fantappie, our Iraq analyst, appeared today on the Kojo Nnamdi Show to discuss recent fighting in the city of Fallujah. In this clip, she talks about how both Nouri al-Maliki and Al-Qaeda are benefiting from the events unfolding in the city. She raises the question: are U.S. military supplies going to help in the struggle against Al-Qaeda or just bolster Maliki’s power?

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6 Jan

Iraq analyst Maria Fantappie spoke to HuffPost Live about the latest fighting in Fallujah. Watch here: huff.lv/1dJxTw5

8 Nov
Check out Crisis Group’s Weekly Update, a summary of everything we have published over the past week.

Check out Crisis Group’s Weekly Update, a summary of everything we have published over the past week.

3 Sep
Joost Hiltermann

Chemical Weapons And Civilians: The Invisible Threat

A quarter century ago, Joost Hiltermann of the International Crisis Group investigated chemical attacks against civilians in Iraq, and says recent images from Syria bring back the “horrible events” of Saddam Hussein’s regime.

FULL INTERVIEW (NPR) 

Photo: Béatrice Dillies au Kurdistan/Flickr

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6 Jun
Turkey Finds that Trouble Knows No Bounds | Chatham House
By Hugh Pope, Crisis Group’s Turkey/Cyprus Project Director
As instability undermines the Arab states established in the post-First World War map of the Middle East, a now vigorous Turkey, heir of the Ottoman Empire that was the main loser from that 20th century order, is taking a new look at the region.
‘Those borders are all false’, sniffed one of Turkey’s former top diplomats over dinner in February. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Turkish Prime Minister, says that Syria’s growing troubles since 2011 now amount to ‘an internal affair’ for Turkey, while in private officials talk breezily of Syria as ‘our former province’.
In the capital Ankara, a senior security official agreed that tumult in Syria over the past two years had vaporized much of the Cold War frontier of barbed wire and watch-towers. ‘The borders have become meaningless,’ he said.
In short, a major change is under way after decades in which Turkish policy was predicated on making the best of what it found in the Middle East.
FULL ARTICLE (Chatham House)
Photo: Carlo Rainone/Flickr

Turkey Finds that Trouble Knows No Bounds | Chatham House

By Hugh Pope, Crisis Group’s Turkey/Cyprus Project Director

As instability undermines the Arab states established in the post-First World War map of the Middle East, a now vigorous Turkey, heir of the Ottoman Empire that was the main loser from that 20th century order, is taking a new look at the region.

‘Those borders are all false’, sniffed one of Turkey’s former top diplomats over dinner in February. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Turkish Prime Minister, says that Syria’s growing troubles since 2011 now amount to ‘an internal affair’ for Turkey, while in private officials talk breezily of Syria as ‘our former province’.

In the capital Ankara, a senior security official agreed that tumult in Syria over the past two years had vaporized much of the Cold War frontier of barbed wire and watch-towers. ‘The borders have become meaningless,’ he said.

In short, a major change is under way after decades in which Turkish policy was predicated on making the best of what it found in the Middle East.

FULL ARTICLE (Chatham House)

Photo: Carlo Rainone/Flickr

5 Jun
Examining Iraq’s Latest Upsurge In Violence | NPR Morning Edition
Sectarian violence has flared in Iraq a year and a half after the departure of American forces. The U.N. reported that more than 1,000 people were killed there in May, the deadliest violence since the height of the insurgency during the U.S. occupation. For more on what’s causing the chaos, Linda Wertheimer talks with Joost Hiltermann, an Iraq expert with the International Crisis Group.
Listen to the interview here.

Examining Iraq’s Latest Upsurge In Violence | NPR Morning Edition

Sectarian violence has flared in Iraq a year and a half after the departure of American forces. The U.N. reported that more than 1,000 people were killed there in May, the deadliest violence since the height of the insurgency during the U.S. occupation. For more on what’s causing the chaos, Linda Wertheimer talks with Joost Hiltermann, an Iraq expert with the International Crisis Group.

Listen to the interview here.