Showing posts tagged as "haiti"

Showing posts tagged haiti

26 Jul
Audio: Is it Time for MINUSTAH to Leave Haiti? | Mark Schneider
Formed in 2004 to restore public order following the removal of then President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) has continued its mission through this year, while also playing a key role in stabilizing Haiti following the January 2010 earthquake.  While many cite Haiti’s continued need for MINUSTAH, given remaining security challenges, many Haitians are calling for the force to leave, citing recent improvements. Many Haitians also feel that, at the least, MINUSTAH’s mission should be updated.
FULL ARTICLE (CSIS) 
Photo: newbeatphoto/Flickr

Audio: Is it Time for MINUSTAH to Leave Haiti? | Mark Schneider

Formed in 2004 to restore public order following the removal of then President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) has continued its mission through this year, while also playing a key role in stabilizing Haiti following the January 2010 earthquake.  While many cite Haiti’s continued need for MINUSTAH, given remaining security challenges, many Haitians are calling for the force to leave, citing recent improvements. Many Haitians also feel that, at the least, MINUSTAH’s mission should be updated.

FULL ARTICLE (CSIS) 

Photo: newbeatphoto/Flickr

30 Apr

Watch Mark Schneider, Crisis Group’s Senior Vice President and Special Adviser on Latin America, discuss UN accountability in Haiti on CBC News 

22 Feb
Haití, Tres Años Después | Reforma
Por Javier Ciurlizza, Director del Programa Latinoamérica y el Caribe
Tres años después del terremoto que sacudió a Haití, el país se encuentra en una carrera contra el tiempo para convencer a sus ciudadanos, a donantes y a posibles inversionistas de que el progreso y la estabilidad son realmente factibles y no sólo una ilusión.
De todos los desafíos, el continuo retraso en llevar a cabo elecciones libres y justas representa el más urgente de todos. El Presidente Michel Martelly lucha desde hace 18 mesespor gobernar una nación dividida. Carece de una base política estable para obtener la aprobación a su estrategia de desarrollo de cinco puntos: empleo, Estado de Derecho, educación, medio ambiente y energía.
Ahora Martelly debe partir sobre la base del tenue acuerdo de Nochebuena de 2012 con el fin de que un órgano electoral creíble desarrolle prontamente las demoradas elecciones al senado, municipales y locales.
ARTICULO COMPLETO (Reforma)
Foto: Elyce Feliz/Flickr

Haití, Tres Años Después | Reforma

Por Javier Ciurlizza, Director del Programa Latinoamérica y el Caribe

Tres años después del terremoto que sacudió a Haití, el país se encuentra en una carrera contra el tiempo para convencer a sus ciudadanos, a donantes y a posibles inversionistas de que el progreso y la estabilidad son realmente factibles y no sólo una ilusión.

De todos los desafíos, el continuo retraso en llevar a cabo elecciones libres y justas representa el más urgente de todos. El Presidente Michel Martelly lucha desde hace 18 mesespor gobernar una nación dividida. Carece de una base política estable para obtener la aprobación a su estrategia de desarrollo de cinco puntos: empleo, Estado de Derecho, educación, medio ambiente y energía.

Ahora Martelly debe partir sobre la base del tenue acuerdo de Nochebuena de 2012 con el fin de que un órgano electoral creíble desarrolle prontamente las demoradas elecciones al senado, municipales y locales.

ARTICULO COMPLETO (Reforma)

Foto: Elyce Feliz/Flickr

14 Feb
Haiti — a state of political dysfunction | Miami Herald
By Mark L. Schneider, Crisis Group’s Senior Vice President
Three years after an earthquake devastated Haiti, its elites seem poised to produce their own man-made disaster of instability and polarization. Unless the nation’s leaders pursue a national governability accord to organize long-delayed elections, halt unconstitutional appointments and address basic needs, Haiti could become a permanent failed state.
The International Crisis Group report published last week: “Governing Haiti: Time for National Consensus” tracks the failure of will across a broad spectrum of Haiti’s national leaders to seek agreement on national challenges.
The most recent triumph of partisan over national interest has been the failure of President Michel Martelly, parliamentary leaders and the business community to implement the governance agreement signed on Christmas Eve with the support of an ad hoc ecumenical body, Religions for Peace.
The pact would have side-stepped the Catch-22 situation where the absence of a third of the senators stymied the legislature’s naming its three members to the nine-member Permanent Electoral Commission (CEP) which was supposed to organize the partial senate elections which should have been held in November 2011.
The agreement provided for a new consensual Transitory Electoral College (TEC). That also would have enabled the removal of the other widely-criticized CEP members who had been named by or were seen as partial to the president.
FULL ARTICLE (Miami Herald)
Photo: Alex Proimos/Flickr

Haiti — a state of political dysfunction | Miami Herald

By Mark L. Schneider, Crisis Group’s Senior Vice President

Three years after an earthquake devastated Haiti, its elites seem poised to produce their own man-made disaster of instability and polarization. Unless the nation’s leaders pursue a national governability accord to organize long-delayed elections, halt unconstitutional appointments and address basic needs, Haiti could become a permanent failed state.

The International Crisis Group report published last week: “Governing Haiti: Time for National Consensus” tracks the failure of will across a broad spectrum of Haiti’s national leaders to seek agreement on national challenges.

The most recent triumph of partisan over national interest has been the failure of President Michel Martelly, parliamentary leaders and the business community to implement the governance agreement signed on Christmas Eve with the support of an ad hoc ecumenical body, Religions for Peace.

The pact would have side-stepped the Catch-22 situation where the absence of a third of the senators stymied the legislature’s naming its three members to the nine-member Permanent Electoral Commission (CEP) which was supposed to organize the partial senate elections which should have been held in November 2011.

The agreement provided for a new consensual Transitory Electoral College (TEC). That also would have enabled the removal of the other widely-criticized CEP members who had been named by or were seen as partial to the president.

FULL ARTICLE (Miami Herald)

Photo: Alex Proimos/Flickr

7 Feb
Haïti a besoin d’un consensus national pour organiser des élections | RFI
Par Amélie Baron
Haïti a besoin en urgence d’un consensus national,  indispensable pour organiser des élections. C’est l’analyse faite par International Crisis Group. Cette organisation non-gouvernementale craint une paralysie du pays. Sur place, c’est la même préoccupation, pour organiser des élections.
ARTICLE COMPLET (RFI)
Photo: Presidencia de la República del Ecuador/Flickr

Haïti a besoin d’un consensus national pour organiser des élections | RFI

Par Amélie Baron

Haïti a besoin en urgence d’un consensus national,  indispensable pour organiser des élections. C’est l’analyse faite par International Crisis Group. Cette organisation non-gouvernementale craint une paralysie du pays. Sur place, c’est la même préoccupation, pour organiser des élections.

ARTICLE COMPLET (RFI)

Photo: Presidencia de la República del Ecuador/Flickr

6 Feb

Listen to Crisis Group’s latest podcast, “It’s Time for a National Consensus in Haiti”. 

Delayed elections, mistrust and public protests against Haitian President Michel Martelly threaten the country’s chance to end decades of political conflict and to recover from the 2010 earthquake. Without a national accord, the country risks ongoing crises. Javier Ciurlizza, Program Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, tells us more on the current challenges Haiti is facing.

5 Feb
"If Haiti is to pull through, the better angels in the natures of its leaders are going to have to prevail for once and prevail soon. This is a thin reed on which to float the country’s future; but it might be all it has."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, “Governing Haiti: Time for National Consensus

4 Feb
"It is increasingly evident that functional governance is unlikely until and unless the business community, religious, professional and political leaderships can reach an accord. Otherwise Haiti faces increasing internal unrest."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, “Governing Haiti: Time for National Consensus

"The Haitian brand of politics in effect virtually excludes the majority of citizens, and it is becoming increasingly difficult for any administration to govern effectively."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, “Governing Haiti: Time for National Consensus

"Haiti needs a national accord to manage reconstruction and development, particularly as it enters a difficult electoral period, whose calendar is still unknown."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, “Governing Haiti: Time for National Consensus