Showing posts tagged as "ej hogendoorn"

Showing posts tagged ej hogendoorn

15 Oct
What next for Al-Shabaab? | Global Public Square
Do the two U.S. raids in Africa this month signal a shift from drone attacks?
It’s not possible to tell at this point. The two raids underscore one limitation of drones: they cannot be used in urban settings where the possibility of killing civilians is very high. This would not only violate international humanitarian law, but would be counter-productive, since it would turn the population against the United States and its allies and possibly radicalize others into joining jihadi groups like Al-Shabaab.
FULL ARTICLE (CNN)
Photo: expertinfanty/Flickr

What next for Al-Shabaab? | Global Public Square

Do the two U.S. raids in Africa this month signal a shift from drone attacks?

It’s not possible to tell at this point. The two raids underscore one limitation of drones: they cannot be used in urban settings where the possibility of killing civilians is very high. This would not only violate international humanitarian law, but would be counter-productive, since it would turn the population against the United States and its allies and possibly radicalize others into joining jihadi groups like Al-Shabaab.

FULL ARTICLE (CNN)

Photo: expertinfanty/Flickr

11 Oct

Security and Governance in Somalia: EJ Hogendoorn’s Testimony before the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, 9 October 2013

EJ Hogendoorn, Crisis Group’s Deputy Africa Program Director, testified at Wednesday’s U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on security and governance in Somalia. The full text of EJ’s testimony is available here. The question and answer portion of the hearing begins at 7:33.

8 Oct

Much has already been written about the latest Al-Shabaab attack in Nairobi. It is however important to note that it had long been expected, and it was certainly not the first, only the most destructive, with consequently the most media attention. Since Kenyan troops went into Somalia, militia groups have launched some 50 attacks into northeastern Kenya, and a number of grenade attacks in Mombasa and Nairobi. Almost all seem to have been aimed at creating a backlash against Kenyan Somalis and Muslims, deepening sectarian divisions and driving those populations to provide more support to radical Islamist groups.

—EJ Hogendoorn, testifying today at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Somalia. Read EJ’s full comments here (PDF).
Photo: UN/Flickr

Much has already been written about the latest Al-Shabaab attack in Nairobi. It is however important to note that it had long been expected, and it was certainly not the first, only the most destructive, with consequently the most media attention. Since Kenyan troops went into Somalia, militia groups have launched some 50 attacks into northeastern Kenya, and a number of grenade attacks in Mombasa and Nairobi. Almost all seem to have been aimed at creating a backlash against Kenyan Somalis and Muslims, deepening sectarian divisions and driving those populations to provide more support to radical Islamist groups.

—EJ Hogendoorn, testifying today at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Somalia. Read EJ’s full comments here (PDF).

Photo: UN/Flickr

LINK

How big is the terrorism threat in Africa?

EJ Hogendoorn, our Deputy Africa Director, will be answering readers’ questions on the threat of terrorism in Africa over on CNN’s GPS blog. Leave your questions in the GPS comment section, and the editors may pick your question to be answered by EJ later this week.


"Al-Shabaab is down but not out."

—EJ Hogendoorn at today’s Senate hearing on Somalia. Read EJ’s full testimony here (PDF).
Photo: UN/Flickr

"Al-Shabaab is down but not out."

—EJ Hogendoorn at today’s Senate hearing on Somalia. Read EJ’s full testimony here (PDF).

Photo: UN/Flickr

25 Sep
Kenyan officials say Nairobi mall siege is over; attack may bolster al-Shabab in jihadists’ eyes | Sudarsan Raghavan
The bloody siege of an upscale mall by Islamist militants ended Tuesday with five of the attackers dead and 11 taken into custody, amid fears that the death toll of more than 60 civilians could substantially rise when authorities begin searching through the wreckage.
“As a nation, our head is bloodied but unbowed,” Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said in a televised address, declaring three days of mourning. “We have ashamed and defeated our attackers.”
FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)
Photo: Uhuru Kenyatta/Flickr

Kenyan officials say Nairobi mall siege is over; attack may bolster al-Shabab in jihadists’ eyes | Sudarsan Raghavan

The bloody siege of an upscale mall by Islamist militants ended Tuesday with five of the attackers dead and 11 taken into custody, amid fears that the death toll of more than 60 civilians could substantially rise when authorities begin searching through the wreckage.

“As a nation, our head is bloodied but unbowed,” Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said in a televised address, declaring three days of mourning. “We have ashamed and defeated our attackers.”

FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)

Photo: Uhuru Kenyatta/Flickr

15 May
Kenya After the Elections
Nairobi/Brussels  |   15 May 2013
Though the 2013 general elections were relatively peaceful, Kenya is still deeply divided and ethnically polarised.
Kenya After the Elections, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group,examines the 4 March elections that saw Jubilee Coalition’s Uhuru Kenyatta declared president. Despite various shortcomings and allegations of irregularities, Kenyans averted a repeat of the 2007-2008 post-election violence. However, the conflict drivers that triggered the 2007 bloodshed, including a culture of impunity, land grievances, corruption, ethnic tensions, weak institutions and regional and socio-economic inequality,have yet to be addressed adequately.
The briefing’s major findings and recommendations are:
The government needs to restore confidence in theelectoral machinery, which was undermined by technical failures in electronic voting and questions over the transparency of the tallying process.
Domestically, implementing devolution presents a crucial test, both in ensuring Kenya’s counties do not become “ethnic fiefdoms” and are inclusive of minority interests, and that they have adequate financial support despite the country’s current fiscal deficit.
Internationally, the new government will need to fully cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) as the cases against the new president and deputy president for their alleged roles in the 2007 election violence proceed. Failure to do so will strain international relations, to the detriment of Kenya’s economy and its people.
Despite the strength of the Jubilee Coalition in the legislatures, the opposition needs to regroup under strong leadership to represent fully the more than five million voters who supported it.
“Maintaining the status quo is simply not an option for a still divided Kenya”, says Cedric Barnes, Crisis Group’s Horn of Africa Project Director. “The ICC cases, a disappointed and bitter opposition and the implementation of an untested system of devolved governance remain significant challenges for the new government”.
“The new government has the opportunity to usher in an era of peace and socio-economic development that would benefit all communities and unite the country”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Deputy Director. “The foundation has been laid with the overwhelming support the constitution received in 2010, a base that should be maintained and built upon for a peaceful and prosperous future”.
FULL BRIEFING

Kenya After the Elections

Nairobi/Brussels  |   15 May 2013

Though the 2013 general elections were relatively peaceful, Kenya is still deeply divided and ethnically polarised.

Kenya After the Elections, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group,examines the 4 March elections that saw Jubilee Coalition’s Uhuru Kenyatta declared president. Despite various shortcomings and allegations of irregularities, Kenyans averted a repeat of the 2007-2008 post-election violence. However, the conflict drivers that triggered the 2007 bloodshed, including a culture of impunity, land grievances, corruption, ethnic tensions, weak institutions and regional and socio-economic inequality,have yet to be addressed adequately.

The briefing’s major findings and recommendations are:

  • The government needs to restore confidence in theelectoral machinery, which was undermined by technical failures in electronic voting and questions over the transparency of the tallying process.
  • Domestically, implementing devolution presents a crucial test, both in ensuring Kenya’s counties do not become “ethnic fiefdoms” and are inclusive of minority interests, and that they have adequate financial support despite the country’s current fiscal deficit.
  • Internationally, the new government will need to fully cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) as the cases against the new president and deputy president for their alleged roles in the 2007 election violence proceed. Failure to do so will strain international relations, to the detriment of Kenya’s economy and its people.
  • Despite the strength of the Jubilee Coalition in the legislatures, the opposition needs to regroup under strong leadership to represent fully the more than five million voters who supported it.

“Maintaining the status quo is simply not an option for a still divided Kenya”, says Cedric Barnes, Crisis Group’s Horn of Africa Project Director. “The ICC cases, a disappointed and bitter opposition and the implementation of an untested system of devolved governance remain significant challenges for the new government”.

“The new government has the opportunity to usher in an era of peace and socio-economic development that would benefit all communities and unite the country”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Deputy Director. “The foundation has been laid with the overwhelming support the constitution received in 2010, a base that should be maintained and built upon for a peaceful and prosperous future”.

FULL BRIEFING

8 Apr
Interview with E.J. Hogendoorn, International Crisis Group, on Kenya’s Elections | ReliefWeb
By John Hirsch
Kenya’s peaceful March 4 elections was the result of hard work by both the Kenyans and the international community, said E.J. Hogendoorn, the deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group (ICG), though there is much that can be improved in the voting process.
"I think that to some degree the elections have been a success because they have been peaceful; they have not really been a success in terms of how they were logistically implemented," said Mr. Hogendoorn.
"There are lots and lots of problems with the modernization of the election process: the creation of a biometric voter registration system, the electronic commission of results completely collapsed, and the electoral board was forced to go back to paper balloting, and so on and so forth," he said.
FULL ARTICLE (ReliefWeb)
Photo: DEMOSH/Flickr

Interview with E.J. Hogendoorn, International Crisis Group, on Kenya’s Elections | ReliefWeb

By John Hirsch

Kenya’s peaceful March 4 elections was the result of hard work by both the Kenyans and the international community, said E.J. Hogendoorn, the deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group (ICG), though there is much that can be improved in the voting process.

"I think that to some degree the elections have been a success because they have been peaceful; they have not really been a success in terms of how they were logistically implemented," said Mr. Hogendoorn.

"There are lots and lots of problems with the modernization of the election process: the creation of a biometric voter registration system, the electronic commission of results completely collapsed, and the electoral board was forced to go back to paper balloting, and so on and so forth," he said.

FULL ARTICLE (ReliefWeb)

Photo: DEMOSH/Flickr

5 Apr
Interview with E.J. Hogendoorn, International Crisis Group, on Kenya’s Elections | The Global Observatory
By John Hirsch
Kenya’s peaceful March 4 elections was the result of hard work by both the Kenyans and the international community, said E.J. Hogendoorn, the deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group (ICG), though there is much that can be improved in the voting process.
"I think that to some degree the elections have been a success because they have been peaceful; they have not really been a success in terms of how they were logistically implemented," said Mr. Hogendoorn.
"There are lots and lots of problems with the modernization of the election process: the creation of a biometric voter registration system, the electronic commission of results completely collapsed, and the electoral board was forced to go back to paper balloting, and so on and so forth," he said.
"But given that, I think the general lessons are that preparations always need to be taken deliberately and to be given a great deal of lead-time, and people need to be very careful that any slippage of the preparations in an electoral campaign can create a lot of confusion and lead to tension."
FULL ARTICLE (The Global Observatory)
Photo: Flickr/ILRI

Interview with E.J. Hogendoorn, International Crisis Group, on Kenya’s Elections | The Global Observatory

By John Hirsch

Kenya’s peaceful March 4 elections was the result of hard work by both the Kenyans and the international community, said E.J. Hogendoorn, the deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group (ICG), though there is much that can be improved in the voting process.

"I think that to some degree the elections have been a success because they have been peaceful; they have not really been a success in terms of how they were logistically implemented," said Mr. Hogendoorn.

"There are lots and lots of problems with the modernization of the election process: the creation of a biometric voter registration system, the electronic commission of results completely collapsed, and the electoral board was forced to go back to paper balloting, and so on and so forth," he said.

"But given that, I think the general lessons are that preparations always need to be taken deliberately and to be given a great deal of lead-time, and people need to be very careful that any slippage of the preparations in an electoral campaign can create a lot of confusion and lead to tension."

FULL ARTICLE (The Global Observatory)

Photo: Flickr/ILRI

15 Feb
Crisis Group Urges Comprehensive Talks to End Sudan Conflicts | IPS
By Jim Lobe
Amidst ongoing violence and continuing humanitarian emergencies in Darfur, South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, the International Crisis Group (ICG) called Thursday for a comprehensive solution to Sudan’s many regional conflicts.
In the first of a series of reports on the subject, the Brussels-based think tank urged the long-ruling National Congress Party (NCP) to sit down with both its armed and unarmed opposition, as well as civil society groups, to forge a transition to a new governance system designed to resolve conflicts between the central government in Khartoum and its restive regions.
It also urged the international community, including the U.N. Security Council, the African Union, and the Arab League, to join the demand for a single, comprehensive solution to Sudan’s multiple conflicts lest the country fragment further 18 months after South Sudan gained its independence.
FULL ARTICLE (IPS)
Photo: Rita Willaert/Flickr

Crisis Group Urges Comprehensive Talks to End Sudan Conflicts | IPS

By Jim Lobe

Amidst ongoing violence and continuing humanitarian emergencies in Darfur, South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, the International Crisis Group (ICG) called Thursday for a comprehensive solution to Sudan’s many regional conflicts.

In the first of a series of reports on the subject, the Brussels-based think tank urged the long-ruling National Congress Party (NCP) to sit down with both its armed and unarmed opposition, as well as civil society groups, to forge a transition to a new governance system designed to resolve conflicts between the central government in Khartoum and its restive regions.

It also urged the international community, including the U.N. Security Council, the African Union, and the Arab League, to join the demand for a single, comprehensive solution to Sudan’s multiple conflicts lest the country fragment further 18 months after South Sudan gained its independence.

FULL ARTICLE (IPS)

Photo: Rita Willaert/Flickr