Showing posts tagged as "crisis group"

Showing posts tagged crisis group

30 Jun
Crisis Group thanks outgoing President & CEO Louise Arbour
Brussels  |   30 Jun 2014
The International Crisis Group wishes to thank Louise Arbour for her five years of service as President & CEO. A long-time supporter of Crisis Group, Louise served on the Board of Trustees before taking up her post at the helm of the organisation in 2009. As she concludes her tenure today, the Board of Trustees and the staff send to her all best wishes upon returning to life in her native Canada.
In recognition of Louise’s remarkable career and, in particular, her impact on the field of conflict prevention and resolution, Crisis Group recently launched The Louise Arbour Fund for Emerging Conflicts. This fund will serve to ensure the organisation is equipped to respond swiftly to new and deadly conflicts and will stand in tribute to Louise’s legacy.  
Former United Nations Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, recently said of Louise that her “energy, dedication, and intellectual and moral integrity are inspiring for all of us”. Crisis Group would like to echo that sentiment and end by saying thank you to Louise for her tireless work on behalf of the organisation these past five years.
Crisis Group will soon be making an announcement regarding the appointment of the next president.

Crisis Group thanks outgoing President & CEO Louise Arbour

Brussels  |   30 Jun 2014

The International Crisis Group wishes to thank Louise Arbour for her five years of service as President & CEO. A long-time supporter of Crisis Group, Louise served on the Board of Trustees before taking up her post at the helm of the organisation in 2009. As she concludes her tenure today, the Board of Trustees and the staff send to her all best wishes upon returning to life in her native Canada.

In recognition of Louise’s remarkable career and, in particular, her impact on the field of conflict prevention and resolution, Crisis Group recently launched The Louise Arbour Fund for Emerging Conflicts. This fund will serve to ensure the organisation is equipped to respond swiftly to new and deadly conflicts and will stand in tribute to Louise’s legacy.  

Former United Nations Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, recently said of Louise that her “energy, dedication, and intellectual and moral integrity are inspiring for all of us”. Crisis Group would like to echo that sentiment and end by saying thank you to Louise for her tireless work on behalf of the organisation these past five years.

Crisis Group will soon be making an announcement regarding the appointment of the next president.

10 Jan
Mali: Reform or Relapse
Dakar/Brussels | 10 Jan. 2014
President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta’s current legitimacy and a strong international presence gives Mali a unique opportunity to engage in serious reforms and inclusive dialogue. However, the window for change is narrow and dangerous political habits are resurfacing.
In its latest report, Mali: Reform or Relapse, the International Crisis Group examines the situation in Mali a year after the beginning of the French intervention. Following France’s “Opération Serval” and the election of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta, territorial integrity and constitutional order are now restored.
However, the north remains a hotbed of persistent intercommunal tensions and localised violence that could jeopardise efforts made so far to stabilise the country. It is time for the government to act beyond wishful thinking, avoid repeating past, unfulfilled promises of change, implement meaningful governance reforms and launch a truly inclusive dialogue on the future of Mali.
The report’s major findings and recommendations are:


The focus on the north should not overshadow the need to lay better foundations for the state as a whole. It is important not to miss the unique opportunity of implementing an ambitious reform on governance and economic development, supported by a well-coordinated international response.
While the June 2013 preliminary Ouagadougou agreement process is stalled, the government is rekindling clientelist links with Tuareg and Arab leaders. This policy is likely to bring short-term stability at the expense of long-term cohesion and inclusiveness, vital for peace and development in the troubled north.
All parties must respect the provisions of the Ouagadougou agreement. The government must show more flexibility and understand that the process of national conferences is not an alternative to truly inclusive talks with all communities, including the armed groups. The latter must accept disarmament and the full return of the Malian administration in Kidal, as well as clarify their political claims.
The UN Security Council and troop-contributing countries should increase without delay the human and logistic resources, especially airborne capacity, of the UN Stabilisation Mission in Mali (MINUSMA). The mission should strengthen its presence and activities to support restoration of state authority in the north fully to fulfil its responsibility to protect civilians, while preserving the neutrality necessary to facilitate negotiations .
“Expectations for President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta run very high”, says Jean-Hervé Jezequel, West Africa Senior Analyst. “It is time for his government to act rather than simply engage in wishful thinking. An easy mistake would be to maintain, in the short term, the current clientelist system that brought former regimes to a standstill”.
“The country’s new leadership and international partners agree that meaningful reforms are required to break with the past”, says Rinaldo Depagne, West Africa Project Director. “Many believe, however, that these reforms are too early, too soon for a state still reeling from the crisis. But it is important not to miss the opportunity of implementing an ambitious reform on governance; at the very least, bad habits of the past should not resurface”.
READ THE FULL REPORT

Mali: Reform or Relapse

Dakar/Brussels | 10 Jan. 2014

President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta’s current legitimacy and a strong international presence gives Mali a unique opportunity to engage in serious reforms and inclusive dialogue. However, the window for change is narrow and dangerous political habits are resurfacing.

In its latest report, Mali: Reform or Relapse, the International Crisis Group examines the situation in Mali a year after the beginning of the French intervention. Following France’s “Opération Serval” and the election of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta, territorial integrity and constitutional order are now restored.

However, the north remains a hotbed of persistent intercommunal tensions and localised violence that could jeopardise efforts made so far to stabilise the country. It is time for the government to act beyond wishful thinking, avoid repeating past, unfulfilled promises of change, implement meaningful governance reforms and launch a truly inclusive dialogue on the future of Mali.

The report’s major findings and recommendations are:

  • The focus on the north should not overshadow the need to lay better foundations for the state as a whole. It is important not to miss the unique opportunity of implementing an ambitious reform on governance and economic development, supported by a well-coordinated international response.
  • While the June 2013 preliminary Ouagadougou agreement process is stalled, the government is rekindling clientelist links with Tuareg and Arab leaders. This policy is likely to bring short-term stability at the expense of long-term cohesion and inclusiveness, vital for peace and development in the troubled north.
  • All parties must respect the provisions of the Ouagadougou agreement. The government must show more flexibility and understand that the process of national conferences is not an alternative to truly inclusive talks with all communities, including the armed groups. The latter must accept disarmament and the full return of the Malian administration in Kidal, as well as clarify their political claims.
  • The UN Security Council and troop-contributing countries should increase without delay the human and logistic resources, especially airborne capacity, of the UN Stabilisation Mission in Mali (MINUSMA). The mission should strengthen its presence and activities to support restoration of state authority in the north fully to fulfil its responsibility to protect civilians, while preserving the neutrality necessary to facilitate negotiations .

“Expectations for President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta run very high”, says Jean-Hervé Jezequel, West Africa Senior Analyst. “It is time for his government to act rather than simply engage in wishful thinking. An easy mistake would be to maintain, in the short term, the current clientelist system that brought former regimes to a standstill”.

“The country’s new leadership and international partners agree that meaningful reforms are required to break with the past”, says Rinaldo Depagne, West Africa Project Director. “Many believe, however, that these reforms are too early, too soon for a state still reeling from the crisis. But it is important not to miss the opportunity of implementing an ambitious reform on governance; at the very least, bad habits of the past should not resurface”.

READ THE FULL REPORT

28 Jun

Check out Crisis Group’s first Weekly Update on Storify

26 Mar
Hey Tumblr, check out our newest interactive presentation, the tie-in for Crisis Group’s recent report, Spider Web: The Making and Unmaking of Iran Sanctions.
Click here to learn about three decades of sanctions.

Hey Tumblr, check out our newest interactive presentation, the tie-in for Crisis Group’s recent report, Spider Web: The Making and Unmaking of Iran Sanctions.

Click here to learn about three decades of sanctions.

22 Mar
from Crisis Group’s Annual Report 2013
Letter from the President, Louise Arbour
In the course of what proved to be a turbulent year, Crisis Group was instrumental in delivering timely analysis and sound recommendations to leaders the world over. The year ahead promises further uncertainty. Taking just two examples, the Syrian conflict looks set to escalate further, and the repercussions of developments in Mali are far from clear but promise to be significant. Meeting these challenges will require renewed efforts and a profound understanding of the dynamics and drivers of conflict in diverse regions of the world.
As the civil war in Syria intensified in 2012 and consecutive peace efforts failed, our analysts continued to report in an extremely complex environment on the devastating military and humanitarian situation. Crisis Group’s reports on the radicalisation of the conflict and extremist currents among the opposition afforded essential insight. In Central and West Africa, the proliferation of armed extremists and rebel groups reflects the relative ease with which radical forces can exploit the political and institutional weakness of countries in transition. Likewise, several states in North Africa face numerous hurdles in their transition to democracy, with enduring political and economic turmoil in Egypt and continued security threats confronting Libya.
Throughout these conflicts and others, Crisis Group has equipped policymakers with informed judgments and practical advice crucial to the de-escalation and prevention of violence. Our analysis of events over the past year has often proved prescient, while our targeted advocacy efforts have produced real results, including the lifting of sanctions against Myanmar and the passage of a United Nations Human Rights Council resolution criticising the Sri Lankan government’s failure to support reconciliation and account adequately for the deaths of perhaps 40,000 civilians at the end of its civil war. In addition, Crisis Group continues to ensure it pays attention to emerging or forgotten crises: last year we reported for the first time on the troubled North Caucasus region of Russia, as well as rising tensions in the South China Sea and the rise of piracy and organised crime in the Gulf of Guinea.
In the coming year, Crisis Group will further its efforts to address security issues in countries currently facing armed conflict, as well as in those emerging from it and those where instability threatens to erupt into open violence. We will also promote dialogue on a range of ­security-related issues, including the rule of law, the effectiveness of sanctions and the rights of national minorities, to ensure that these concerns continue to be adequately addressed in security circles.
Of course, at the root of any successful organisation lies the talent and dedication of its staff. I would like to take this opportunity to thank my colleagues for their hard work and congratulate them on the real-life impact they have made in promoting peace and stability throughout the world.
Brussels, 1 February 2013
Louise Arbour, President and CEO

from Crisis Group’s Annual Report 2013

Letter from the President, Louise Arbour

In the course of what proved to be a turbulent year, Crisis Group was instrumental in delivering timely analysis and sound recommendations to leaders the world over. The year ahead promises further uncertainty. Taking just two examples, the Syrian conflict looks set to escalate further, and the repercussions of developments in Mali are far from clear but promise to be significant. Meeting these challenges will require renewed efforts and a profound understanding of the dynamics and drivers of conflict in diverse regions of the world.

As the civil war in Syria intensified in 2012 and consecutive peace efforts failed, our analysts continued to report in an extremely complex environment on the devastating military and humanitarian situation. Crisis Group’s reports on the radicalisation of the conflict and extremist currents among the opposition afforded essential insight. In Central and West Africa, the proliferation of armed extremists and rebel groups reflects the relative ease with which radical forces can exploit the political and institutional weakness of countries in transition. Likewise, several states in North Africa face numerous hurdles in their transition to democracy, with enduring political and economic turmoil in Egypt and continued security threats confronting Libya.

Throughout these conflicts and others, Crisis Group has equipped policymakers with informed judgments and practical advice crucial to the de-escalation and prevention of violence. Our analysis of events over the past year has often proved prescient, while our targeted advocacy efforts have produced real results, including the lifting of sanctions against Myanmar and the passage of a United Nations Human Rights Council resolution criticising the Sri Lankan government’s failure to support reconciliation and account adequately for the deaths of perhaps 40,000 civilians at the end of its civil war. In addition, Crisis Group continues to ensure it pays attention to emerging or forgotten crises: last year we reported for the first time on the troubled North Caucasus region of Russia, as well as rising tensions in the South China Sea and the rise of piracy and organised crime in the Gulf of Guinea.

In the coming year, Crisis Group will further its efforts to address security issues in countries currently facing armed conflict, as well as in those emerging from it and those where instability threatens to erupt into open violence. We will also promote dialogue on a range of ­security-related issues, including the rule of law, the effectiveness of sanctions and the rights of national minorities, to ensure that these concerns continue to be adequately addressed in security circles.

Of course, at the root of any successful organisation lies the talent and dedication of its staff. I would like to take this opportunity to thank my colleagues for their hard work and congratulate them on the real-life impact they have made in promoting peace and stability throughout the world.

Brussels, 1 February 2013

Louise Arbour, President and CEO

23 Jan

Watch Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and Chief Executive Officer, live at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2013: De-Risking Africa 

19 Oct
Global Briefing: 18-19 October 2012 
The International Crisis Group is currently hosting its flagship annual event, The Global Briefing: an exclusive two-day, high-level gathering examining urgent issues and solutions concerning major conflict flashpoints across the globe. Held on Thursday 18 and Friday 19 October 2012, we will post updates on our Twitter handle @crisisgroup with the hashtag #CGGB. Join the conversation! 
More details and information can be found on the Global Briefing section of our website. 

Global Briefing: 18-19 October 2012 

The International Crisis Group is currently hosting its flagship annual event, The Global Briefing: an exclusive two-day, high-level gathering examining urgent issues and solutions concerning major conflict flashpoints across the globe. Held on Thursday 18 and Friday 19 October 2012, we will post updates on our Twitter handle @crisisgroup with the hashtag #CGGB. Join the conversation! 

More details and information can be found on the Global Briefing section of our website

15 Aug
We now have over 15,000 followers on Tumblr! Thank you all. If you want to learn more about Crisis Group, please go to our website: www.crisisgroup.org


We now have over 15,000 followers on Tumblr! Thank you all. If you want to learn more about Crisis Group, please go to our website: www.crisisgroup.org

26 Mar
An international think tank has warned that US-led talks with the Taliban are going nowhere and has called for the UN to take the lead in peace negotiations to prevent Afghanistan from sliding into civil war.
In a report released Sunday, the Brussels-based International Crisis Group said current negotiations were unlikely to achieve a sustainable peace because they were dominated by the US and hampered by a “half-hearted and haphazard” approach by the Afghan government.
"Far from being Afghan-led, the negotiating agenda has been dominated by Washington’s desire to obtain a decent interval between the planned US troop drawdown and the possibility of another bloody chapter in the conflict," the report says.
The ICG said the result thus far of international involvement in negotiations had been to embolden “spoilers” like insurgents, government officials and war profiteers, “who now recognise that the international community’s most urgent priority is to exit Afghanistan with or without a settlement”.
Regional players like Pakistan and Iran have also significantly hindered talks, the report says.
Candace Rondeaux, senior Afghanistan analyst with the ICG and one of the report’s authors, said time was running out to get peace talks back on track.
The past few months had seen efforts led by the US to negotiate with the Taliban “faltering left and right”, she said.
The Taliban announced two weeks ago that it was suspending preliminary talks with the US because of what they described as “the shaky, erratic and vague standpoint of the Americans”.
The ICG report said the Afghan government must make greater efforts to include a range of ethnic and civil society groups in peace negotiations, and not just deal with warlords.
It said any negotiations must be transparent.
However, the ICG said the Karzai government is not in a good position to agree to a settlement with insurgents because it was “debilitated by internal political divisions and external pressures”.
It said political competition in Afghanistan would heat up in the run-up to the withdrawal of international combat forces at the end of 2014, and “the differing priorities and preferences of the parties to the conflict - from the Afghan government to the Taliban leadership to key regional and wider international actors - will further undermine the prospects of peace”.
A UN-mandated mediation team is needed if a civil war is to be averted once international combat troops leave Afghanistan.
"Given that we only have two years before NATO forces pull out, it is critical that there is intervention from a third party that is acceptable to the Taliban, acceptable to the other opposition groups, acceptable to the Afghan government, and to all the players that are engaged in the negotiation process," Ms Rondeaux said.
FULL ARTICLE (Herald Sun)
Photo: BotMultiChillT/Wikimedia Comons

An international think tank has warned that US-led talks with the Taliban are going nowhere and has called for the UN to take the lead in peace negotiations to prevent Afghanistan from sliding into civil war.

In a report released Sunday, the Brussels-based International Crisis Group said current negotiations were unlikely to achieve a sustainable peace because they were dominated by the US and hampered by a “half-hearted and haphazard” approach by the Afghan government.

"Far from being Afghan-led, the negotiating agenda has been dominated by Washington’s desire to obtain a decent interval between the planned US troop drawdown and the possibility of another bloody chapter in the conflict," the report says.

The ICG said the result thus far of international involvement in negotiations had been to embolden “spoilers” like insurgents, government officials and war profiteers, “who now recognise that the international community’s most urgent priority is to exit Afghanistan with or without a settlement”.

Regional players like Pakistan and Iran have also significantly hindered talks, the report says.

Candace Rondeaux, senior Afghanistan analyst with the ICG and one of the report’s authors, said time was running out to get peace talks back on track.

The past few months had seen efforts led by the US to negotiate with the Taliban “faltering left and right”, she said.

The Taliban announced two weeks ago that it was suspending preliminary talks with the US because of what they described as “the shaky, erratic and vague standpoint of the Americans”.

The ICG report said the Afghan government must make greater efforts to include a range of ethnic and civil society groups in peace negotiations, and not just deal with warlords.

It said any negotiations must be transparent.

However, the ICG said the Karzai government is not in a good position to agree to a settlement with insurgents because it was “debilitated by internal political divisions and external pressures”.

It said political competition in Afghanistan would heat up in the run-up to the withdrawal of international combat forces at the end of 2014, and “the differing priorities and preferences of the parties to the conflict - from the Afghan government to the Taliban leadership to key regional and wider international actors - will further undermine the prospects of peace”.

A UN-mandated mediation team is needed if a civil war is to be averted once international combat troops leave Afghanistan.

"Given that we only have two years before NATO forces pull out, it is critical that there is intervention from a third party that is acceptable to the Taliban, acceptable to the other opposition groups, acceptable to the Afghan government, and to all the players that are engaged in the negotiation process," Ms Rondeaux said.

FULL ARTICLE (Herald Sun)

Photo: BotMultiChillT/Wikimedia Comons

A regional cooperation conference on Afghanistan is set to begin in the Tajik capital, Dushanbe. The two-day gathering will bring together the presidents of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, and Iran. It’s the fifth such regional conference focusing on security in Afghanistan and the region. The conference is expected to follow up on the decisions to strengthen regional economic cooperation reached at the last gathering in Istanbul.  It comes as a fresh report by the International Crisis Group (ICG) predicts attempts by the Afghan government of President Hamid Karzai to negotiate with the Taliban are unlikely to lead to a lasting peace. The Brussels-based group says any deal that appears to give the Taliban preferential treatment could spark a backlash from the Northern Alliance, Hezb-e Islami, and other major factions. The ICG also says the West is eager to pull out of Afghanistan “with or without a settlement.”
FULL ARTICLE (Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty)
Photo: President Karzai, Officer/Wikimedia Commons

A regional cooperation conference on Afghanistan is set to begin in the Tajik capital, Dushanbe. 

The two-day gathering will bring together the presidents of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, and Iran. 

It’s the fifth such regional conference focusing on security in Afghanistan and the region. 

The conference is expected to follow up on the decisions to strengthen regional economic cooperation reached at the last gathering in Istanbul.  

It comes as a fresh report by the International Crisis Group (ICG) predicts attempts by the Afghan government of President Hamid Karzai to negotiate with the Taliban are unlikely to lead to a lasting peace. 

The Brussels-based group says any deal that appears to give the Taliban preferential treatment could spark a backlash from the Northern Alliance, Hezb-e Islami, and other major factions. 

The ICG also says the West is eager to pull out of Afghanistan “with or without a settlement.”

FULL ARTICLE (Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty)

Photo: President Karzai, Officer/Wikimedia Commons