Showing posts tagged as "coup"

Showing posts tagged coup

8 Oct
Profile: Who are Yemen’s Houthis? | Manuel Almeida
Watched by Yemeni soldiers scattered around Sanaa’s Tahrir Square, a large crowd of Houthi rebels gathered on Sept. 23 to listen to Abdul Malik al-Houthi’s televised speech. “These great efforts created this great success – victory for all the people, forcing a response to popular demands,” the Houthi leader said, two days after the rebels tightened their control over the Yemeni capital, Sanaa.
Until very recently, this would have been unthinkable: a rebel group once mostly confined to the Saada and Amran governorates now calling the shots in the capital and taking over key state institutions.
On Tuesday Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi appointed Ahmad Awad bin Mubarak (his office director) as the country’s new prime minister. Three weeks ago the Yemeni government and the Houthis signed a deal on the formation of a new national unity government. But the Houthis promptly rejected the Mubarak’s appointment. Amid this, more and more in Yemen and the region are asking about what the Houthis believe in and what their true objective is.
FULL ARTICLE (Al Arabiya News)
Picture: Rod Waddington/flickr

Profile: Who are Yemen’s Houthis? | Manuel Almeida

Watched by Yemeni soldiers scattered around Sanaa’s Tahrir Square, a large crowd of Houthi rebels gathered on Sept. 23 to listen to Abdul Malik al-Houthi’s televised speech. “These great efforts created this great success – victory for all the people, forcing a response to popular demands,” the Houthi leader said, two days after the rebels tightened their control over the Yemeni capital, Sanaa.

Until very recently, this would have been unthinkable: a rebel group once mostly confined to the Saada and Amran governorates now calling the shots in the capital and taking over key state institutions.

On Tuesday Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi appointed Ahmad Awad bin Mubarak (his office director) as the country’s new prime minister. Three weeks ago the Yemeni government and the Houthis signed a deal on the formation of a new national unity government. But the Houthis promptly rejected the Mubarak’s appointment. Amid this, more and more in Yemen and the region are asking about what the Houthis believe in and what their true objective is.

FULL ARTICLE (Al Arabiya News)

Picture: Rod Waddington/flickr

11 Nov

Guinea-Bissau trudging along in crisis | IRIN

The delay of polls in Guinea-Bissau signals the likely extension of a transition period currently scheduled to wind down on 31 December. The transition follows an April 2012 coup that has weakened the economy, caused dire food insecurity and repelled major donors.

FULL ARTICLE (globalsecurity.org)

9 Apr
Sudan army men jailed up to 5 years over ‘coup’ | AFP via GlobalPost
Sudan has experienced at least seven coups or attempted coups in its 57-year history.
Following the plot revelations, the Brussels-based International Crisis Group, a think-tank, said that a coup to overthrow Bashir’s crisis-ridden administration could further destabilise the country.
"A coup or a military campaign to topple the regime would be a very dangerous proposition risking even greater violence and further disintegration," ICG said.
FULL ARTICLE (AFP via GlobalPost)
Photo: Steve Evans/Flickr

Sudan army men jailed up to 5 years over ‘coup’ | AFP via GlobalPost

Sudan has experienced at least seven coups or attempted coups in its 57-year history.

Following the plot revelations, the Brussels-based International Crisis Group, a think-tank, said that a coup to overthrow Bashir’s crisis-ridden administration could further destabilise the country.

"A coup or a military campaign to topple the regime would be a very dangerous proposition risking even greater violence and further disintegration," ICG said.

FULL ARTICLE (AFP via GlobalPost)

Photo: Steve Evans/Flickr

26 Sep
Mali Crisis Persists Six Months After Coup | Voice of America
By Anne Look
Mali remains mired in uncertainty six months after a military coup derailed what was a relatively stable, but some say faltering, democracy and paved the way for al-Qaida-linked Islamist militants to seize the northern half of the country.  
It has been six months since an army mutiny spiraled into a military coup in the early hours of March 22.
Some in Mali cheered the coup as the shock treatment the country needed - a purging of an unpopular leadership that many said was corrupt, and chance to get back on track.
But the reality has been much different. Many Malians say life is getting worse, not better.
FULL ARTICLE (Voice of America)
Photo: openDemocracy/Flickr

Mali Crisis Persists Six Months After Coup | Voice of America

By Anne Look

Mali remains mired in uncertainty six months after a military coup derailed what was a relatively stable, but some say faltering, democracy and paved the way for al-Qaida-linked Islamist militants to seize the northern half of the country.  

It has been six months since an army mutiny spiraled into a military coup in the early hours of March 22.

Some in Mali cheered the coup as the shock treatment the country needed - a purging of an unpopular leadership that many said was corrupt, and chance to get back on track.

But the reality has been much different. Many Malians say life is getting worse, not better.

FULL ARTICLE (Voice of America)

Photo: openDemocracy/Flickr

23 Sep
Hundreds Convicted in Turkish Coup Trial | Wall Street Journal
By Emre Peker
ISTANBUL—A Turkish court found more than 300 active and retired military officers guilty of plotting to overthrow the government, in a sign that the judiciary is joining a government-led effort to strip the armed forces of political influence.
FULL ARTICLE (Wall Street Journal)
Photo: Darwinek/Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds Convicted in Turkish Coup Trial | Wall Street Journal

By Emre Peker

ISTANBUL—A Turkish court found more than 300 active and retired military officers guilty of plotting to overthrow the government, in a sign that the judiciary is joining a government-led effort to strip the armed forces of political influence.

FULL ARTICLE (Wall Street Journal)

Photo: Darwinek/Wikimedia Commons

17 Aug
Beyond Turf Wars in Coup-Hit Guinea-Bissau
Dakar/Brussels  |  17 Aug 2012
International actors need to commit to a common strategy to help coup-plagued Guinea-Bissau implement the security, justice and electoral reforms it needs to escape its status as a link in drug trafficking to Europe.
Beyond Turf Wars: Managing the Post-Coup Transition in Guinea-Bissau, the latest International Crisis Group report, urges the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Community of Portuguese Speaking Countries (CPLP), notably Angola and Portugal who are driving its policy, to set aside differences and work with the transitional authorities to define a mandate for the ECOWAS mission in Bissau and then seek UN Security Council approval of it. ECOWAS, with support from international partners, must be allowed to take the lead in setting benchmarks for the interim government to follow and ensuring that donor aid is linked to achieving them.
“ECOWAS is the only game in town because it has the ear of the transitional authorities, but it must urgently start a dialogue with the CPLP and reach a consensus for how to restore constitutional order”, says Vincent Foucher, Crisis Group’s West Africa Senior Analyst. “They have to forget their turf fights and concentrate on taking advantage of opportunities to at last bring about highly needed reforms”.
After the 12 April coup deprived Carlos Gomes Júnior of an apparently certain election as president in a second round later that month, ECOWAS was pushed by Nigeria, Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire and Burkina Faso to forge a transitional agreement with the junta. That scuttled Angola’s influence in Guinea-Bissau, forcing it to withdraw its controversial military mission. ECOWAS has been more lenient toward the Guinean military, and its support for the transitional government and a year-long transition is at odds with the CPLP’s demand for prompt resumption of the aborted electoral process.
The divergence in approaches has hindered the transition process and is the last thing Guinea-Bissau needs. Despite drug money, it is one of the poorest countries in the world, with at least half its population below the poverty line. In recent years, it has endured civil war, political assassinations and several coups. No president has ever completed a full term (Malam Bacai Sanhá died in office of natural causes in January). The economy has been devastated – the cashew trade, its top income earner, is cut by half this year – and many citizens lack access to crucial services.
While the coup halted another attempt at establishing democracy, it also revealed many important factors that international policymakers should not ignore. It demonstrated that tense relations between civilian and military elites have never been resolved, which exacerbates broader grievances around issues of citizenship, human rights and regional inequalities. It likewise exposed frustrations in the political and military elites with Gomes Júnior’s divisive political style and the weakness of the electoral system.  
“The standoff between ECOWAS and the CPLP results in loss of time, energy and opportunities”, Comfort Ero, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Director, warns. “If the situation is not dealt with adequately, including by providing credible assurances that Gomes Júnior can safely return to political life, rumours of a new coup may well not continue to be just rumours”.
See pictures of the Guinea-Bissau research trip. You can also listen to the podcast here.
FULL REPORT

Beyond Turf Wars in Coup-Hit Guinea-Bissau

Dakar/Brussels  |  17 Aug 2012

International actors need to commit to a common strategy to help coup-plagued Guinea-Bissau implement the security, justice and electoral reforms it needs to escape its status as a link in drug trafficking to Europe.

Beyond Turf Wars: Managing the Post-Coup Transition in Guinea-Bissau, the latest International Crisis Group report, urges the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Community of Portuguese Speaking Countries (CPLP), notably Angola and Portugal who are driving its policy, to set aside differences and work with the transitional authorities to define a mandate for the ECOWAS mission in Bissau and then seek UN Security Council approval of it. ECOWAS, with support from international partners, must be allowed to take the lead in setting benchmarks for the interim government to follow and ensuring that donor aid is linked to achieving them.

“ECOWAS is the only game in town because it has the ear of the transitional authorities, but it must urgently start a dialogue with the CPLP and reach a consensus for how to restore constitutional order”, says Vincent Foucher, Crisis Group’s West Africa Senior Analyst. “They have to forget their turf fights and concentrate on taking advantage of opportunities to at last bring about highly needed reforms”.

After the 12 April coup deprived Carlos Gomes Júnior of an apparently certain election as president in a second round later that month, ECOWAS was pushed by Nigeria, Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire and Burkina Faso to forge a transitional agreement with the junta. That scuttled Angola’s influence in Guinea-Bissau, forcing it to withdraw its controversial military mission. ECOWAS has been more lenient toward the Guinean military, and its support for the transitional government and a year-long transition is at odds with the CPLP’s demand for prompt resumption of the aborted electoral process.

The divergence in approaches has hindered the transition process and is the last thing Guinea-Bissau needs. Despite drug money, it is one of the poorest countries in the world, with at least half its population below the poverty line. In recent years, it has endured civil war, political assassinations and several coups. No president has ever completed a full term (Malam Bacai Sanhá died in office of natural causes in January). The economy has been devastated – the cashew trade, its top income earner, is cut by half this year – and many citizens lack access to crucial services.

While the coup halted another attempt at establishing democracy, it also revealed many important factors that international policymakers should not ignore. It demonstrated that tense relations between civilian and military elites have never been resolved, which exacerbates broader grievances around issues of citizenship, human rights and regional inequalities. It likewise exposed frustrations in the political and military elites with Gomes Júnior’s divisive political style and the weakness of the electoral system.  

“The standoff between ECOWAS and the CPLP results in loss of time, energy and opportunities”, Comfort Ero, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Director, warns. “If the situation is not dealt with adequately, including by providing credible assurances that Gomes Júnior can safely return to political life, rumours of a new coup may well not continue to be just rumours”.

See pictures of the Guinea-Bissau research trip. You can also listen to the podcast here.

FULL REPORT

5 Aug

CrisisWatch N°108, 2 August 2012

This month’s podcast reviews developments for the month of July, highlighting deteriorated situations in India, Madagascar, Mali, Syria and Tajikistan.

18 Jul
Mali: Avoiding Escalation
Dakar/Brussels  |   18 Jul 2012
Calls for military intervention in Mali are increasing but it could sink the state, which is already on the brink of dissolution, further into chaos.
Mali: Avoiding Escalation, the latest report by the International Crisis Group, urges Mali’s main actors, regional organisations and the international community to seek a political rather than military solution to its woes. Although French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius did not rule out a “military option” during his visit to Algiers last Sunday, an armed intervention in the current political and security conditions would do more harm than good. It is urgent to restore state political, institutional and security foundations prior to working toward the north’s reintegration into the republic.
“Armed and unarmed actors in the north and south must engage in negotiations to achieve a political solution to the crisis”, says Gilles Yabi, Crisis Group’s West Africa Project Director. “The relations between the centre of power in Bamako and the periphery must be improved through radical rethinking of governance of the north, which has rested in the last few years on loose networks of patronage and personal alliances”.
Mali was plunged into chaos after a Tuareg rebellion in the north, buoyed by the crisis in Libya, prompted rank-and-file army officers to lead a coup against President Amadou Toumani Touré on 22 March. In spite of ECOWAS’s (Economic Community of West African States) mediation efforts, the transitional institutions’ lack of credibility and junta leader Captain Amadou Haya Sanogo’s refusal to stay on the sidelines hinder progress. Interim President Dioncounda Traoré is still in Paris, recovering from an attack against him by coup supporters on 21 May, and the government of Prime Minister Cheick Modibo Diarra does not represent Mali’s political and social diversity.
Ironically, the coup in Bamako and subsequent political turmoil have allowed the Tuareg rebellion, originally led by the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) but soon outflanked by Islamist group Ansar Dine, to take over the north. The presence of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb raises fears that the Sahel region could become a safe haven for terrorists.
But this grim prospect should not result in hasty decisions and rash actions. All actors must be wary of military intervention given the fragility of the country and the state of its armed forces. It would turn Mali into a new front of the “war on terror”’ and rule out any chance of peaceful coexistence between communities in the north and south. Mali, its neighbours and Western and multilateral actors must work together to foster dialogue between Malians from all regions and isolate foreign opportunistic terrorist groups. They must help restore the political foundations of the central state through a national unity government and reorganisation of the armed forces, and increase humanitarian aid to the Sahel-Sahara region to prevent an economic collapse. Mali’s partners with the necessary resources should provide intelligence support to the governments of the region in their fight against terrorist groups.
“The fear of a north controlled by extremist militants must not lead to a uniform logic of repression against terrorism”, warns Comfort Ero, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Director. “Controlling radicalisation and negotiating all conflicts inside Malian society is the answer to the crisis”.
FULL REPORT (English overview, full text in French)

Mali: Avoiding Escalation

Dakar/Brussels  |   18 Jul 2012

Calls for military intervention in Mali are increasing but it could sink the state, which is already on the brink of dissolution, further into chaos.

Mali: Avoiding Escalation, the latest report by the International Crisis Group, urges Mali’s main actors, regional organisations and the international community to seek a political rather than military solution to its woes. Although French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius did not rule out a “military option” during his visit to Algiers last Sunday, an armed intervention in the current political and security conditions would do more harm than good. It is urgent to restore state political, institutional and security foundations prior to working toward the north’s reintegration into the republic.

“Armed and unarmed actors in the north and south must engage in negotiations to achieve a political solution to the crisis”, says Gilles Yabi, Crisis Group’s West Africa Project Director. “The relations between the centre of power in Bamako and the periphery must be improved through radical rethinking of governance of the north, which has rested in the last few years on loose networks of patronage and personal alliances”.

Mali was plunged into chaos after a Tuareg rebellion in the north, buoyed by the crisis in Libya, prompted rank-and-file army officers to lead a coup against President Amadou Toumani Touré on 22 March. In spite of ECOWAS’s (Economic Community of West African States) mediation efforts, the transitional institutions’ lack of credibility and junta leader Captain Amadou Haya Sanogo’s refusal to stay on the sidelines hinder progress. Interim President Dioncounda Traoré is still in Paris, recovering from an attack against him by coup supporters on 21 May, and the government of Prime Minister Cheick Modibo Diarra does not represent Mali’s political and social diversity.

Ironically, the coup in Bamako and subsequent political turmoil have allowed the Tuareg rebellion, originally led by the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) but soon outflanked by Islamist group Ansar Dine, to take over the north. The presence of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb raises fears that the Sahel region could become a safe haven for terrorists.

But this grim prospect should not result in hasty decisions and rash actions. All actors must be wary of military intervention given the fragility of the country and the state of its armed forces. It would turn Mali into a new front of the “war on terror”’ and rule out any chance of peaceful coexistence between communities in the north and south. Mali, its neighbours and Western and multilateral actors must work together to foster dialogue between Malians from all regions and isolate foreign opportunistic terrorist groups. They must help restore the political foundations of the central state through a national unity government and reorganisation of the armed forces, and increase humanitarian aid to the Sahel-Sahara region to prevent an economic collapse. Mali’s partners with the necessary resources should provide intelligence support to the governments of the region in their fight against terrorist groups.

“The fear of a north controlled by extremist militants must not lead to a uniform logic of repression against terrorism”, warns Comfort Ero, Crisis Group’s Africa Program Director. “Controlling radicalisation and negotiating all conflicts inside Malian society is the answer to the crisis”.

FULL REPORT (English overview, full text in French)

17 Jul
Fix Mali political crisis before taking on rebels: ICG | Reuters
By David Lewis
Any efforts to tackle the crisis in Mali must focus on rebuilding a central state authority before trying to recapture northern desert zones now mainly in the hands of al Qaeda-linked Islamists, the International Crisis Group said.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: Emilio Labrador/Flickr

Fix Mali political crisis before taking on rebels: ICG | Reuters

By David Lewis

Any efforts to tackle the crisis in Mali must focus on rebuilding a central state authority before trying to recapture northern desert zones now mainly in the hands of al Qaeda-linked Islamists, the International Crisis Group said.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: Emilio Labrador/Flickr

4 Jun
International Crisis Group

Guinea-Bissau's Transition after the Coup

Guinea-Bissau’s Transition after the Coup | International Crisis Group

24 May 2012:  On 12 April a military uprising ousted former prime minister Carlos Gomes Júnior just as he was about to compete in a run-off presidential election that he was poised to win. Gabriela Keseberg Dávalos, Senior Communications Officer for the International Crisis Group, and Vincent Foucher, Crisis Group West Africa Senior Analyst, were in Bissau to examine the current situation in the country. In this podcast they discuss the reasons for theoverthrow and the priorities of the new transitional government. 8.19

Photo: International Crisis Group

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