Showing posts tagged as "conflict resolution"

Showing posts tagged conflict resolution

29 Aug
Female teacher killed in Thai Muslim south | Anadolu Agency
BANGKOK - Thailand’s south awoke to fresh violence Thursday morning, as the military government continues to plan peace talks with insurgents, which have been suspended for nine months.
Police lieutenant Pramote Chuichuey told the Anadolu Agency that a bomb exploded as a group of officers escorted teachers to a school in the Kokpo district of Pattani, killing a 28-year-old female and injuring another and a policeman.
"The bomb, contained in a gas tank, was buried on the side of the road," he said, adding that insurgents had detonated it remotely as the motorbike convoy passed.
Teachers are the frequent targets of insurgents in the south - whose population is majority ethnic Malay Muslim - as they are considered symbols of the Thai central State, against whom insurgents are fighting. 
FULL ARTICLE (Anadolu Agency)
Photo: Seamus/flickr

Female teacher killed in Thai Muslim south | Anadolu Agency

BANGKOK - Thailand’s south awoke to fresh violence Thursday morning, as the military government continues to plan peace talks with insurgents, which have been suspended for nine months.

Police lieutenant Pramote Chuichuey told the Anadolu Agency that a bomb exploded as a group of officers escorted teachers to a school in the Kokpo district of Pattani, killing a 28-year-old female and injuring another and a policeman.

"The bomb, contained in a gas tank, was buried on the side of the road," he said, adding that insurgents had detonated it remotely as the motorbike convoy passed.

Teachers are the frequent targets of insurgents in the south - whose population is majority ethnic Malay Muslim - as they are considered symbols of the Thai central State, against whom insurgents are fighting. 

FULL ARTICLE (Anadolu Agency)

Photo: Seamus/flickr

"Iran should accept more quantitative constraints on the number of its centrifuges and postpone plans for industrial-scale enrichment. In return, the P5+1 should accept the continuation of qualitative growth of Tehran’s enrichment capacity through research and development."

—From Crisis Group’s latest briefing: Iran and the P5+1: Getting to “Yes”

29 Apr

Sudan and South Sudan: The Humanitarian Crisis in South Sudan (Part 4)

Casie Copeland, Crisis Group’s Consulting Analyst and Jérôme Tubiana, Crisis Group’s Sudan Senior Analyst, discuss the relationship of China, the biggest consumer of South Sudanese oil, with both Sudan and South Sudan.

crisisgroup.org

Sudan and South Sudan: The Humanitarian Crisis in South Sudan (Part 3)

Casie Copeland, Crisis Group’s Consulting Analyst and Jérôme Tubiana, Crisis Group’s Sudan Senior Analyst, stress the increasingly regional nature of the conflict in South Sudan.

crisisgroup.org

Sudan and South Sudan: The Humanitarian Crisis in South Sudan (Part 2)

Casie Copeland, Crisis Group’s Consulting Analyst and Jérôme Tubiana, Crisis Group’s Sudan Senior Analyst, highlight the growing humanitarian crisis in South Sudan, recently declared a “Level 3” global emergency by the UNOCHR, a distinction shared only by Syria and the Central African Republic. The UN has worryingly issued a warning of famine in a country where perhaps 1 million people have been displaced in the last 3 months.

crisisgroup.org

16 Dec
Our new CrisisWatch map tracks dozens of conflicts around the world — come back each month for the latest in news and analysis. We also plan to add the entire CrisisWatch archive in coming weeks!
crisisgroup.be

Our new CrisisWatch map tracks dozens of conflicts around the world — come back each month for the latest in news and analysis. We also plan to add the entire CrisisWatch archive in coming weeks!

crisisgroup.be

3 May
"I believe that we have achieved very high levels of universal norms enunciation, in legal instruments, in our literature. I think the normative environment is very impressive. The disconnect is between the norms and their enforcement."

—Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

2 May

We have to take a step back, first of all, and not purport to impose our own system of values and so on. If we are true democrats, I think our first obligation is to defer to the people who have their own set of aspirations and values.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

We have to take a step back, first of all, and not purport to impose our own system of values and so on. If we are true democrats, I think our first obligation is to defer to the people who have their own set of aspirations and values.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

We still live in a world that is much more deferential to states than to the people that these states are supposed to represent. I think we have yet to build communities that genuinely reflect their own population.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

20 Oct
This is Not a Revolution | The New York Review of Books 
Hussein Agha and Robert Malley 
Darkness descends upon the Arab world. Waste, death, and destruction attend a fight for a better life. Outsiders compete for influence and settle accounts. The peaceful demonstrations with which this began, the lofty values that inspired them, become distant memories. Elections are festive occasions where political visions are an afterthought. The only consistent program is religious and is stirred by the past. A scramble for power is unleashed, without clear rules, values, or endpoint. It will not stop with regime change or survival. History does not move forward. It slips sideways.
Games occur within games: battles against autocratic regimes, a Sunni–Shiite confessional clash, a regional power struggle, a newly minted cold war. Nations divide, minorities awaken, sensing a chance to step out of the state’s confining restrictions. The picture is blurred. These are but fleeting fragments of a landscape still coming into its own, with only scrappy hints of an ultimate destination. The changes that are now believed to be essential are liable to be disregarded as mere anecdotes on an extended journey.
FULL ARTICLE (The New York Review of Books)(paywall)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Flickr

This is Not a Revolution | The New York Review of Books 

Hussein Agha and Robert Malley 

Darkness descends upon the Arab world. Waste, death, and destruction attend a fight for a better life. Outsiders compete for influence and settle accounts. The peaceful demonstrations with which this began, the lofty values that inspired them, become distant memories. Elections are festive occasions where political visions are an afterthought. The only consistent program is religious and is stirred by the past. A scramble for power is unleashed, without clear rules, values, or endpoint. It will not stop with regime change or survival. History does not move forward. It slips sideways.

Games occur within games: battles against autocratic regimes, a Sunni–Shiite confessional clash, a regional power struggle, a newly minted cold war. Nations divide, minorities awaken, sensing a chance to step out of the state’s confining restrictions. The picture is blurred. These are but fleeting fragments of a landscape still coming into its own, with only scrappy hints of an ultimate destination. The changes that are now believed to be essential are liable to be disregarded as mere anecdotes on an extended journey.

FULL ARTICLE (The New York Review of Books)(paywall)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Flickr