Showing posts tagged as "Sudan"

Showing posts tagged Sudan

26 Feb
Egypt’s Generals turn to an Old Rival in the Fight against Islamist Militancy in Sinai | Tom Stevenson
For over two years, the Islamist militant group Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis (ABM) has been launching violent attacks against the Egyptian state in North Sinai. These fighters have been responsible for killing dozens of Egyptians in coordinated bombings, carrying out a handful of assassination attempts, and earlier this month demonstrated a possible change in tactics when suicide attackers blew up a bus killing three South Korean tourists and the Egyptian driver.
Despite regular claims to have killed or captured key militants, the Egyptian government’s attempts to quell the violence from this group have so far proven ineffective. There have been over 300 reported attacks since last July, and the run of attacks shows no sign of abating.
With insecurity in the Sinai peninsula deteriorating and Cairo looking short of options, it is little wonder that it has turned to others for help in tackling the Islamist militancy. However its latest choice of partner may raise some eyebrows.
FULL ARTICLE (Think Africa Press)
Photo: Hossam el-Hamalawy/flickr

Egypt’s Generals turn to an Old Rival in the Fight against Islamist Militancy in Sinai | Tom Stevenson

For over two years, the Islamist militant group Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis (ABM) has been launching violent attacks against the Egyptian state in North Sinai. These fighters have been responsible for killing dozens of Egyptians in coordinated bombings, carrying out a handful of assassination attempts, and earlier this month demonstrated a possible change in tactics when suicide attackers blew up a bus killing three South Korean tourists and the Egyptian driver.

Despite regular claims to have killed or captured key militants, the Egyptian government’s attempts to quell the violence from this group have so far proven ineffective. There have been over 300 reported attacks since last July, and the run of attacks shows no sign of abating.

With insecurity in the Sinai peninsula deteriorating and Cairo looking short of options, it is little wonder that it has turned to others for help in tackling the Islamist militancy. However its latest choice of partner may raise some eyebrows.

FULL ARTICLE (Think Africa Press)

Photo: Hossam el-Hamalawy/flickr

18 Feb
South Sudan’s crisis ripples across region | IRIN
A cessation of hostilities agreement signed by parties to the conflict in South Sudan has led to a considerable reduction in violence, although some fighting has taken place recently in Unity and Lakes states. 
But the new country’s crisis is far from over - some 870,000 people have fled their homes since fighting began in mid-December - and it has implications well beyond the borders of South Sudan itself. Some of these aftereffects are explored in this article.
FULL ARTICLE (IRIN)
Photo: EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection/flickr

South Sudan’s crisis ripples across region | IRIN

A cessation of hostilities agreement signed by parties to the conflict in South Sudan has led to a considerable reduction in violence, although some fighting has taken place recently in Unity and Lakes states. 

But the new country’s crisis is far from over - some 870,000 people have fled their homes since fighting began in mid-December - and it has implications well beyond the borders of South Sudan itself. Some of these aftereffects are explored in this article.

FULL ARTICLE (IRIN)

Photo: EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection/flickr

11 Feb

Sudan’s Spreading Conflict (III): The Limits of Darfur’s Peace Process

Check out the entire slideshow here

From A Dafur DecadeTen Years of War, the slideshow accompanying the report Sudan’s Spreading Conflict (III): The Limits of Darfur’s Peace Processthe third report in a series that analyses the roots of the conflicts in Sudan’s peripheries. The war in Darfur started more than ten years ago and continues to affect civilian populations within western Sudan as well as in neighbouring states, including Chad and the newly formed South Sudan.

View the entire slideshow here

From A Dafur DecadeTen Years of War, the slideshow accompanying the report Sudan’s Spreading Conflict (III): The Limits of Darfur’s Peace Processthe third report in a series that analyses the roots of the conflicts in Sudan’s peripheries. The war in Darfur started more than ten years ago and continues to affect civilian populations within western Sudan as well as in neighbouring states, including Chad and the newly formed South Sudan.

View the entire slideshow here

28 Jan
Sudan’s Spreading Conflict (III): The Limits of Darfur’s Peace Process
Nairobi/Brussels  |   27 Jan 2014
If Darfur is to have durable peace, all parties to the country’s multiple conflicts need to develop a more holistic means of addressing both local conflicts and nationwide grievances.
In The Limits of Darfur’s Peace Process, the third report in its Sudan’s Spreading Conflict series on the violence besetting the country’s peripheries, the International Crisis Group analyses Darfur and the contradiction between the piecemeal and comprehensive approaches to the decade-old war. The region is increasingly off the international radar, even though a spike in violence displaced nearly half a million additional people in 2013. The 2011 Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) has not been implemented, and the main insurgent groups have allied and assert an increasingly national agenda.
The report’s major findings and recommendations are:
The roots of the long conflict in Darfur are similar to those of the civil wars that Sudan’s other peripheries have experienced – notably, unequal relations with the centre.
The DDPD remains largely unimplemented because it was rejected by the main rebel factions, who instead joined the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) fighting in South Kordofan and Blue Nile, forming the Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) alliance. The government’s major financial commitments to Darfur’s reconstruction and development were not honoured, due in part to the economic crisis following the separation of South Sudan.
International players (including the UN and African Union) lack a coherent vision of how to solve Darfur and Sudan’s other conflicts. They need to take into account the new SRF alliance and its increasingly national agenda.
Many international players have continued to support both the piecemeal DDPD and a national solution to all Sudan crises. The contradiction between the two approaches can be solved only by separating local provisions from national ones. By transferring the latter to a nationwide, comprehensive process, the DDPD could more effectively contribute to the reconstruction of Darfur, including its social fabric. It could also serve as one of the bases for a national dialogue that would include the ruling National Congress Party, the armed and unarmed opposition and civil society.
“Sudanese and international players alike are divided on a crucial choice: keep negotiating on Darfur and other conflicts separately, or adopt a national approach to solve all at once”, says Jérôme Tubiana, Senior Sudan Analyst. “In Darfur, the rebel movements’ main leaders have always claimed some national agenda and a commitment to national unity. This provides an opportunity to include Sudan’s most populous region in a nationwide process”.
“Darfur has alternated for a decade between being a headline conflict and a forgotten one. Horrific violence and displacement continue”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Africa Program Deputy Director. “It is time Sudan and its partners abandoned piecemeal approaches in favour of a comprehensive national dialogue and inclusive talks. At stake is no less than the end of decades of chronic conflict – and perhaps Sudan’s unity”.
FULL REPORT

Sudan’s Spreading Conflict (III): The Limits of Darfur’s Peace Process

Nairobi/Brussels  |   27 Jan 2014

If Darfur is to have durable peace, all parties to the country’s multiple conflicts need to develop a more holistic means of addressing both local conflicts and nationwide grievances.

In The Limits of Darfur’s Peace Process, the third report in its Sudan’s Spreading Conflict series on the violence besetting the country’s peripheries, the International Crisis Group analyses Darfur and the contradiction between the piecemeal and comprehensive approaches to the decade-old war. The region is increasingly off the international radar, even though a spike in violence displaced nearly half a million additional people in 2013. The 2011 Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) has not been implemented, and the main insurgent groups have allied and assert an increasingly national agenda.

The report’s major findings and recommendations are:

The roots of the long conflict in Darfur are similar to those of the civil wars that Sudan’s other peripheries have experienced – notably, unequal relations with the centre.

The DDPD remains largely unimplemented because it was rejected by the main rebel factions, who instead joined the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) fighting in South Kordofan and Blue Nile, forming the Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) alliance. The government’s major financial commitments to Darfur’s reconstruction and development were not honoured, due in part to the economic crisis following the separation of South Sudan.

International players (including the UN and African Union) lack a coherent vision of how to solve Darfur and Sudan’s other conflicts. They need to take into account the new SRF alliance and its increasingly national agenda.

Many international players have continued to support both the piecemeal DDPD and a national solution to all Sudan crises. The contradiction between the two approaches can be solved only by separating local provisions from national ones. By transferring the latter to a nationwide, comprehensive process, the DDPD could more effectively contribute to the reconstruction of Darfur, including its social fabric. It could also serve as one of the bases for a national dialogue that would include the ruling National Congress Party, the armed and unarmed opposition and civil society.

“Sudanese and international players alike are divided on a crucial choice: keep negotiating on Darfur and other conflicts separately, or adopt a national approach to solve all at once”, says Jérôme Tubiana, Senior Sudan Analyst. “In Darfur, the rebel movements’ main leaders have always claimed some national agenda and a commitment to national unity. This provides an opportunity to include Sudan’s most populous region in a nationwide process”.

“Darfur has alternated for a decade between being a headline conflict and a forgotten one. Horrific violence and displacement continue”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Africa Program Deputy Director. “It is time Sudan and its partners abandoned piecemeal approaches in favour of a comprehensive national dialogue and inclusive talks. At stake is no less than the end of decades of chronic conflict – and perhaps Sudan’s unity”.

FULL REPORT

23 Jan
S. Sudan Conflict Delays Agreements with Sudan | Marthe van der Wolf
The conflict in South Sudan is also affecting relations with its northern neighbor Sudan.
Among other things, South Sudan’s conflict has delayed the implementation of economic, trade and security agreements signed with its northern neighbor, Sudan. 
Negotiations on those issues took more than a year, with the help of the African Union (AU). 
Liz Geare of the U.S.-based group Conflicts Dynamic International believes the outbreak of violence in South Sudan is undermining the progress of building a constructive relationship between the two nations.
“I think one of the important issues to look at is the fact that both Sudan and South Sudan need to have a reasonable degree of internal peace and stability, politically, economically, in order for the relationship between South Sudan and Sudan to thrive,“ she said.
The two neighboring countries separated in 2011, following a 2005 peace agreement that ended decades of war. Disagreements between the two nations led to South Sudan shutting down its oil production, which badly affected its neighbor economically.
FULL ARTICLE (Voice of America)
Photo: Enough Project/flickr

S. Sudan Conflict Delays Agreements with Sudan | Marthe van der Wolf

The conflict in South Sudan is also affecting relations with its northern neighbor Sudan.

Among other things, South Sudan’s conflict has delayed the implementation of economic, trade and security agreements signed with its northern neighbor, Sudan. 

Negotiations on those issues took more than a year, with the help of the African Union (AU). 

Liz Geare of the U.S.-based group Conflicts Dynamic International believes the outbreak of violence in South Sudan is undermining the progress of building a constructive relationship between the two nations.

“I think one of the important issues to look at is the fact that both Sudan and South Sudan need to have a reasonable degree of internal peace and stability, politically, economically, in order for the relationship between South Sudan and Sudan to thrive,“ she said.

The two neighboring countries separated in 2011, following a 2005 peace agreement that ended decades of war. Disagreements between the two nations led to South Sudan shutting down its oil production, which badly affected its neighbor economically.

FULL ARTICLE (Voice of America)

Photo: Enough Project/flickr