Showing posts tagged as "NATO"

Showing posts tagged NATO

3 Sep
Afghan turmoil threatens NATO’s ‘mission accomplished’ plans | ADRIAN CROFT AND MIRWAIS HAROONI
(Reuters) - NATO will declare “mission accomplished” this week as it winds down more than a decade of operations in Afghanistan but departing combat troops look likely to leave behind political turmoil and an emboldened insurgency.
The embattled country is also suffering a sharp economic slowdown.
NATO had hoped its summit in Wales on Thursday and Friday would herald a smooth handover of security at the end of this year from the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to Afghan forces. It then plans to cut back its role to a smaller mission to train and advise Afghan troops.
The 28-nation alliance had also hoped to celebrate Afghanistan’s first democratic transfer of power by inviting a new president to share the spotlight with U.S. President Barack Obama and the other 27 allied leaders.
Instead, NATO diplomats privately admit that the backdrop to the summit is the “worst case scenario”.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: U.S. Navy Photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist (SW) Jeremy L. Wood via Chuck Holton/flickr

Afghan turmoil threatens NATO’s ‘mission accomplished’ plans | ADRIAN CROFT AND MIRWAIS HAROONI

(Reuters) - NATO will declare “mission accomplished” this week as it winds down more than a decade of operations in Afghanistan but departing combat troops look likely to leave behind political turmoil and an emboldened insurgency.

The embattled country is also suffering a sharp economic slowdown.

NATO had hoped its summit in Wales on Thursday and Friday would herald a smooth handover of security at the end of this year from the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to Afghan forces. It then plans to cut back its role to a smaller mission to train and advise Afghan troops.

The 28-nation alliance had also hoped to celebrate Afghanistan’s first democratic transfer of power by inviting a new president to share the spotlight with U.S. President Barack Obama and the other 27 allied leaders.

Instead, NATO diplomats privately admit that the backdrop to the summit is the “worst case scenario”.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: U.S. Navy Photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist (SW) Jeremy L. Wood via Chuck Holton/flickr

10 Mar
Voices on Afghanistan: How will the Nato troop withdrawal impact security? | Graeme Smith
I spent about half a year travelling to some of the areas where the insurgency has been really active in Afghanistan in different corners of the country and looking at the effect of troops withdrawals.
I wanted a peek into what happens when you pull out foreign troops.
It’s quite a seismic shift that’s underway. At the peak we had a 130,000 International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) personnel on the ground. And that number is shrinking rapidly.
About 40,000 today. It could get down to 20,000 later this year. And, depending on how the negotiations go for a bilateral security agreement, we could get down to zero by the end of the year. Or some modest number could stay behind.
Either way it’s a dramatic change in the military landscape. I wanted to peek over the parapets and see what the effect is.
And sadly the answer is that the ground held by the Afghan government is shrinking modestly and violence is up. Not only is violence up but the military balance between the Taliban and the Afghan government is precarious.
It’s a hard-fought battle. I worry that if we don’t give enough support to the Afghan government it could tip in favour of the Taliban.
Today, there are roughly almost as many causalities on the Afghan government side as on the Taliban side. Now, as a component of that number, the Taliban are dying a lot more. They have trouble evacuating their causalities from the battlefield versus a lot more injuries on the Afghan government side.
The fact that those numbers are so close gives you an illustration of how tough it is out there.
The Afghan government needs helicopters. The US Congress in November decided to cut off the supply of helicopters that they were buying. And I think that’s silly, to be honest. You can’t just cut off the supply of helicopters to the fledgling Afghan air force and say, ‘Good luck.’
I went to Faryab province in the north-west, which is hundreds of kilometres away from the Taliban heartlands of the south and east and yet still has a growing problem with the insurgency.
There are Taliban there. All foreign troops have been out since September 2012. So it’s an interesting case study. It’s a look at what happens when you have absolutely zero foreign intervention.
And the short answer is violence is up significantly and the government is losing ground.
I also looked at Kunar in the east. Kunar was one of the most famous battlegrounds for US forces. At point, one valley of one district of the province, the Korengal Valley, accounted for about one-fifth of all air strikes in the whole country. And today the Korengal is quiet. Today, that district, Pech, is quiet. Violence is down considerably in those areas. Because the foreigners have departed and the Taliban have quietly taken over or other insurgent groups have quietly taken over areas that Afghan forces just decided not to patrol.
But unfortunately, in the province as a whole, violence remains exceptionally high. There’s been no quieting down of the whole province because the violence has just moved to different areas.
I also went to Kandahar. Kandahar is an interesting metaphor for the country as a whole because the centre is holding. Violence is actually down for the first time in ages in urban areas, in the downtown parts of Kandahar city, where it’s safer to walk around.
There’s been a huge influx of Afghan forces and they’ve done a good job of simply locking the place down. You walk around Kandahar city and you see Afghan forces sitting on the street corners, every single street corner.
But if you go out into the districts, it’s a different story.
They are more violent than they were. Violence continues to rise in Kandahar as a whole.
The last place I went to was Paktia, in the south-east. Paktia was a bright spot on the map. It was the only good news story that I found.
And it’s hard to understand why it’s emerged as a good news story actually. As the foreigners left the violence decreased dramatically. Violence today is a third of what it was a couple of years ago. Lots of people in Paktia simply say when the foreigners left the Taliban didn’t have a reason to fight any more. Because there were no more invading infidels and so the justification for war evaporated.
I would say to them that’s the case in all these other places I visited, where things are worse.
So what is it about this area?
The usual explanation is that the tribal structure is very clear and strong in Paktia.
Different tribes control different districts.
They have support from the Afghan government but the centre of gravity is with the tribes. And they have a long tradition of guarding their own territory. There’s that sense of independence there that maybe isn’t there in some of the other places.
In some ways what we are dealing with is hundreds of little different insurgencies across the country. All being fought simultaneously. But I think it’s important to realise that most of the people who are fighting, whether they are for the government or against the government, most of them have a vision for Afghanistan.
There are nationalists on both sides.
The threat that many people saw of Afghan forces simply giving up or giving up their weapons and going home or cutting quiet deals with the Taliban, happened in only a few places. If you look at the country as a whole the Afghan security forces are still fighting. The number of young men who are willing to sign up to protect the Afghan government and die fighting the Taliban is still really high. It’s going to be a fight.
The Taliban cannot just walk back into Kabul.
COMMENTARY (The National)
Photo: US Army/Flickr

Voices on Afghanistan: How will the Nato troop withdrawal impact security? | Graeme Smith

I spent about half a year travelling to some of the areas where the insurgency has been really active in Afghanistan in different corners of the country and looking at the effect of troops withdrawals.

I wanted a peek into what happens when you pull out foreign troops.

It’s quite a seismic shift that’s underway. At the peak we had a 130,000 International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) personnel on the ground. And that number is shrinking rapidly.

About 40,000 today. It could get down to 20,000 later this year. And, depending on how the negotiations go for a bilateral security agreement, we could get down to zero by the end of the year. Or some modest number could stay behind.

Either way it’s a dramatic change in the military landscape. I wanted to peek over the parapets and see what the effect is.

And sadly the answer is that the ground held by the Afghan government is shrinking modestly and violence is up. Not only is violence up but the military balance between the Taliban and the Afghan government is precarious.

It’s a hard-fought battle. I worry that if we don’t give enough support to the Afghan government it could tip in favour of the Taliban.

Today, there are roughly almost as many causalities on the Afghan government side as on the Taliban side. Now, as a component of that number, the Taliban are dying a lot more. They have trouble evacuating their causalities from the battlefield versus a lot more injuries on the Afghan government side.

The fact that those numbers are so close gives you an illustration of how tough it is out there.

The Afghan government needs helicopters. The US Congress in November decided to cut off the supply of helicopters that they were buying. And I think that’s silly, to be honest. You can’t just cut off the supply of helicopters to the fledgling Afghan air force and say, ‘Good luck.’

I went to Faryab province in the north-west, which is hundreds of kilometres away from the Taliban heartlands of the south and east and yet still has a growing problem with the insurgency.

There are Taliban there. All foreign troops have been out since September 2012. So it’s an interesting case study. It’s a look at what happens when you have absolutely zero foreign intervention.

And the short answer is violence is up significantly and the government is losing ground.

I also looked at Kunar in the east. Kunar was one of the most famous battlegrounds for US forces. At point, one valley of one district of the province, the Korengal Valley, accounted for about one-fifth of all air strikes in the whole country. And today the Korengal is quiet. Today, that district, Pech, is quiet. Violence is down considerably in those areas. Because the foreigners have departed and the Taliban have quietly taken over or other insurgent groups have quietly taken over areas that Afghan forces just decided not to patrol.

But unfortunately, in the province as a whole, violence remains exceptionally high. There’s been no quieting down of the whole province because the violence has just moved to different areas.

I also went to Kandahar. Kandahar is an interesting metaphor for the country as a whole because the centre is holding. Violence is actually down for the first time in ages in urban areas, in the downtown parts of Kandahar city, where it’s safer to walk around.

There’s been a huge influx of Afghan forces and they’ve done a good job of simply locking the place down. You walk around Kandahar city and you see Afghan forces sitting on the street corners, every single street corner.

But if you go out into the districts, it’s a different story.

They are more violent than they were. Violence continues to rise in Kandahar as a whole.

The last place I went to was Paktia, in the south-east. Paktia was a bright spot on the map. It was the only good news story that I found.

And it’s hard to understand why it’s emerged as a good news story actually. As the foreigners left the violence decreased dramatically. Violence today is a third of what it was a couple of years ago. Lots of people in Paktia simply say when the foreigners left the Taliban didn’t have a reason to fight any more. Because there were no more invading infidels and so the justification for war evaporated.

I would say to them that’s the case in all these other places I visited, where things are worse.

So what is it about this area?

The usual explanation is that the tribal structure is very clear and strong in Paktia.

Different tribes control different districts.

They have support from the Afghan government but the centre of gravity is with the tribes. And they have a long tradition of guarding their own territory. There’s that sense of independence there that maybe isn’t there in some of the other places.

In some ways what we are dealing with is hundreds of little different insurgencies across the country. All being fought simultaneously. But I think it’s important to realise that most of the people who are fighting, whether they are for the government or against the government, most of them have a vision for Afghanistan.

There are nationalists on both sides.

The threat that many people saw of Afghan forces simply giving up or giving up their weapons and going home or cutting quiet deals with the Taliban, happened in only a few places. If you look at the country as a whole the Afghan security forces are still fighting. The number of young men who are willing to sign up to protect the Afghan government and die fighting the Taliban is still really high. It’s going to be a fight.

The Taliban cannot just walk back into Kabul.

COMMENTARY (The National)

Photo: US Army/Flickr

16 Jan
Grabbing the Wolf’s Tail | Graeme Smith
“The Taliban are still here,” a pharmacist who sells medicine to remote villages in the southeast told me last month in this shabby frontier town. “People are anxious about 2014 because the troops are leaving.”
After his customers started to understand recently that the United States and its allies will pull out most of their forces this year, he said, his sales of medication for anxiety, depression and insomnia increased 30-fold. Fear of a Taliban resurgence is so widespread that it is hurting property prices and the value of Afghanistan’s currency, scaring investors away and impelling Afghans to seek foreign asylum. Worries about the year ahead are a kind of pathology here.
FULL COMMENTARY (New York Times)
Photo: United Nations Photo/Flickr

Grabbing the Wolf’s Tail | Graeme Smith

“The Taliban are still here,” a pharmacist who sells medicine to remote villages in the southeast told me last month in this shabby frontier town. “People are anxious about 2014 because the troops are leaving.”

After his customers started to understand recently that the United States and its allies will pull out most of their forces this year, he said, his sales of medication for anxiety, depression and insomnia increased 30-fold. Fear of a Taliban resurgence is so widespread that it is hurting property prices and the value of Afghanistan’s currency, scaring investors away and impelling Afghans to seek foreign asylum. Worries about the year ahead are a kind of pathology here.

FULL COMMENTARY (New York Times)

Photo: United Nations Photo/Flickr

22 Jul
Afghan Mission Not Quite Ending | Paul Weinberg
NATO member countries like Canada will continue to be asked to shoulder the burden of a military mission stuck in Afghanistan because of the continued vulnerability of the Kabul-based government.
Although Ottawa has announced that the approximately 900 Canadian soldiers training the trainers within the Afghan security forces will return home next year, most experts expect that this contribution to the NATO will continue past that date.
The speculation is that starting in 2014, the U.S. will withdraw most of its troops but leave behind about 9,000 for training and other assistance for the Afghan forces, said Graeme Smith, a Canadian and a Kabul-based analyst for the International Crisis Group.
FULL ARTICLE (Inter Press Service)
Photo: US Army/Flickr

Afghan Mission Not Quite Ending | Paul Weinberg

NATO member countries like Canada will continue to be asked to shoulder the burden of a military mission stuck in Afghanistan because of the continued vulnerability of the Kabul-based government.

Although Ottawa has announced that the approximately 900 Canadian soldiers training the trainers within the Afghan security forces will return home next year, most experts expect that this contribution to the NATO will continue past that date.

The speculation is that starting in 2014, the U.S. will withdraw most of its troops but leave behind about 9,000 for training and other assistance for the Afghan forces, said Graeme Smith, a Canadian and a Kabul-based analyst for the International Crisis Group.

FULL ARTICLE (Inter Press Service)

Photo: US Army/Flickr

26 Oct
All change | The Economist
Some confidence in the security transition, and a belief that Western governments will not abandon Afghanistan after 2014, is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for a more or less successful political transition. Foreigners can help, but most of the responsibility lies with Afghans. A report published this month by the International Crisis Group, a Brussels-based NGO, described the road to the 2014 elections as long and hard. “In the current environment”, the report said, “prospects for clean elections and a smooth transition are slim. The electoral process is mired in bureaucratic confusion, institutional duplication and political machinations…There are alarming signs Karzai hopes to stack the deck for a favoured proxy.”
FULL ARTICLE (The Economist)
Photo: ISAF Media/Flickr

All change | The Economist

Some confidence in the security transition, and a belief that Western governments will not abandon Afghanistan after 2014, is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for a more or less successful political transition. Foreigners can help, but most of the responsibility lies with Afghans. A report published this month by the International Crisis Group, a Brussels-based NGO, described the road to the 2014 elections as long and hard. “In the current environment”, the report said, “prospects for clean elections and a smooth transition are slim. The electoral process is mired in bureaucratic confusion, institutional duplication and political machinations…There are alarming signs Karzai hopes to stack the deck for a favoured proxy.”

FULL ARTICLE (The Economist)

Photo: ISAF Media/Flickr

21 Oct
NATO chief calls for free elections in Afghanistan | Reuters Africa
By Adrian Croft
MAZAR-E SHARIF, Afghanistan (Reuters) - NATO’s chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen urged the Afghan government on Friday to strive for free, fair and transparent elections in the 2014 presidential poll, saying they marked a critical juncture in the country’s quest for peace.
His words came a day after President Hamid Karzai suggested foreign members be removed from the election watchdog, in a step that could be seen as bolstering his grip on power.
"I think it is essential for building trust and confidence between the Afghan people and the Afghan government that the presidential elections take place in a manner that is free, fair and transparent," Rasmussen said in an interview with Reuters on the airstrip at Camp Marmal, a sprawling military base near Mazar-e-Sharif in northern Afghanistan.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters Africa)
Photo: payorivero/Flickr

NATO chief calls for free elections in Afghanistan | Reuters Africa

By Adrian Croft

MAZAR-E SHARIF, Afghanistan (Reuters) - NATO’s chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen urged the Afghan government on Friday to strive for free, fair and transparent elections in the 2014 presidential poll, saying they marked a critical juncture in the country’s quest for peace.

His words came a day after President Hamid Karzai suggested foreign members be removed from the election watchdog, in a step that could be seen as bolstering his grip on power.

"I think it is essential for building trust and confidence between the Afghan people and the Afghan government that the presidential elections take place in a manner that is free, fair and transparent," Rasmussen said in an interview with Reuters on the airstrip at Camp Marmal, a sprawling military base near Mazar-e-Sharif in northern Afghanistan.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters Africa)

Photo: payorivero/Flickr

15 Oct
Afghan government could ‘collapse post-NATO’ | Al Jazeera
The Afghan government could implode after NATO troops pull out in 2014, particularly if presidential elections are fraudulent, according to a report by the International Crisis Group (ICG).
A repeat could undermine what little hope remains for stability after the Afghan government takes full responsibility for security from US-led NATO forces, the analysis by the respected Brussels-based group says.
The report, Afghanistan: The Long, Hard Road to the 2014 Transition, says the country is on course in 2014 for another set of fraudulent elections after the chaotic presidential and parliamentary polls in 2009 and 2010.
"There is a real risk that the regime in Kabul could collapse upon NATO’s withdrawal," Candace Rondeaux, the ICG’s senior Afghanistan analyst, says in the report.
FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera)
Photo: The U.S. Army/Flickr

Afghan government could ‘collapse post-NATO’ | Al Jazeera

The Afghan government could implode after NATO troops pull out in 2014, particularly if presidential elections are fraudulent, according to a report by the International Crisis Group (ICG).

A repeat could undermine what little hope remains for stability after the Afghan government takes full responsibility for security from US-led NATO forces, the analysis by the respected Brussels-based group says.

The report, Afghanistan: The Long, Hard Road to the 2014 Transition, says the country is on course in 2014 for another set of fraudulent elections after the chaotic presidential and parliamentary polls in 2009 and 2010.

"There is a real risk that the regime in Kabul could collapse upon NATO’s withdrawal," Candace Rondeaux, the ICG’s senior Afghanistan analyst, says in the report.

FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera)

Photo: The U.S. Army/Flickr

14 Oct
Afghanistan facing humanitarian crisis, warns Red Cross head | The Telegraph
By Ben Farmer
Reto Stocker said he was “filled with concern” as he prepared to leave after seven years and hope for the future among Afghans had been “steadily declining”.
The assessment from one of the largest humanitarian charities in Afghanistan sharply contradicts Nato claims of progress in the 11-year-long campaign to defeat the Taliban and rebuild the country.
But his remarks followed a recent rash of similarly bleak forecasts for Afghanistan’s future as Nato troops withdraw and prepare to hand over security duties to Kabul by the end of 2014.
FULL ARTCLE (The Telegraph)
Photo: DVIDSHUB/Flickr

Afghanistan facing humanitarian crisis, warns Red Cross head | The Telegraph

By Ben Farmer

Reto Stocker said he was “filled with concern” as he prepared to leave after seven years and hope for the future among Afghans had been “steadily declining”.

The assessment from one of the largest humanitarian charities in Afghanistan sharply contradicts Nato claims of progress in the 11-year-long campaign to defeat the Taliban and rebuild the country.

But his remarks followed a recent rash of similarly bleak forecasts for Afghanistan’s future as Nato troops withdraw and prepare to hand over security duties to Kabul by the end of 2014.

FULL ARTCLE (The Telegraph)

Photo: DVIDSHUB/Flickr

9 Oct
Afghanistan’s Transition Meltdown
Kabul/Brussels  |   8 Oct 2012
Afghanistan is hurtling toward a devastating political crisis as the government prepares to take full control of security in 2014.
“There is a real risk that the regime in Kabul could collapse upon NATO’s withdrawal in 2014”, says Candace Rondeaux, the International Crisis Group’s Senior Afghanistan Analyst. “The window for remedial action is closing fast”.
Afghanistan: The Long, Hard Road to the 2014 Transition, Crisis Group’s new report, explains how the country is on course for another set of fraudulent elections and how that could  undermine what little hope remains for stability after it takes full responsibility for security.
“The Afghan army and police are overwhelmed and underprepared for the transition”, says Rondeaux. “Another botched election and resultant unrest would push them to breaking point”.
The new report details the challenge ahead as the country’s political leaders prepare for political and security transition in eighteen months. The government’s credibility has not recovered since the fraudulent and chaotic presidential and parliamentary polls in 2009 and 2010, and so far, leaders have been unable to reverse the downward spiral.
“President Karzai and parliament have long known what needs to be done to ensure a clean vote, but they have steadfastly refused to take any serious steps in that direction”, says Rondeaux. “Karzai seems more interested in perpetuating his own power by any means rather than ensuring credibility of the political system and long-term stability in the country”.
Resolving both the long crisis over electoral administration and related constitutional disputes could well be the key to determining whether the current political system will survive the NATO drawdown. If the elections are again nothing but fraud, the credibility of the authorities will be cast into even deeper doubt, and more people will look to alternatives.
Many key tasks are unfinished, particularly regarding electoral oversight. Confusion over the rival authority of several commissions and the courts threatens to unravel the system entirely. Constitutional defects need to be addressed, and rule of law has to be reinforced as the transition unfolds. As the first step, the date for presidential elections should be set as soon as possible.
Unfortunately, it is not likely many in the political elite view the problem this way. The danger is that President Karzai’s top priority is maintaining control, either directly or via a trusted proxy. He and other leading members of the elite may be able to cobble together a broad temporary alliance, but political competition is likely to turn violent on the heels of NATO’s withdrawal.
The possibility cannot be excluded that he will declare a state of emergency as a means of extending his power. Such a move would accelerate state collapse and likely precipitate the next civil war in the country. If that occurs, there would be few opportunities to reverse course in the near term. Securing the peace in Afghanistan would then remain at best a very distant hope.
FULL REPORT

Afghanistan’s Transition Meltdown

Kabul/Brussels  |   8 Oct 2012

Afghanistan is hurtling toward a devastating political crisis as the government prepares to take full control of security in 2014.

“There is a real risk that the regime in Kabul could collapse upon NATO’s withdrawal in 2014”, says Candace Rondeaux, the International Crisis Group’s Senior Afghanistan Analyst. “The window for remedial action is closing fast”.

Afghanistan: The Long, Hard Road to the 2014 Transition, Crisis Group’s new report, explains how the country is on course for another set of fraudulent elections and how that could  undermine what little hope remains for stability after it takes full responsibility for security.

“The Afghan army and police are overwhelmed and underprepared for the transition”, says Rondeaux. “Another botched election and resultant unrest would push them to breaking point”.

The new report details the challenge ahead as the country’s political leaders prepare for political and security transition in eighteen months. The government’s credibility has not recovered since the fraudulent and chaotic presidential and parliamentary polls in 2009 and 2010, and so far, leaders have been unable to reverse the downward spiral.

“President Karzai and parliament have long known what needs to be done to ensure a clean vote, but they have steadfastly refused to take any serious steps in that direction”, says Rondeaux. “Karzai seems more interested in perpetuating his own power by any means rather than ensuring credibility of the political system and long-term stability in the country”.

Resolving both the long crisis over electoral administration and related constitutional disputes could well be the key to determining whether the current political system will survive the NATO drawdown. If the elections are again nothing but fraud, the credibility of the authorities will be cast into even deeper doubt, and more people will look to alternatives.

Many key tasks are unfinished, particularly regarding electoral oversight. Confusion over the rival authority of several commissions and the courts threatens to unravel the system entirely. Constitutional defects need to be addressed, and rule of law has to be reinforced as the transition unfolds. As the first step, the date for presidential elections should be set as soon as possible.

Unfortunately, it is not likely many in the political elite view the problem this way. The danger is that President Karzai’s top priority is maintaining control, either directly or via a trusted proxy. He and other leading members of the elite may be able to cobble together a broad temporary alliance, but political competition is likely to turn violent on the heels of NATO’s withdrawal.

The possibility cannot be excluded that he will declare a state of emergency as a means of extending his power. Such a move would accelerate state collapse and likely precipitate the next civil war in the country. If that occurs, there would be few opportunities to reverse course in the near term. Securing the peace in Afghanistan would then remain at best a very distant hope.

FULL REPORT

2 Oct
Insider attacks threaten NATO mission in Afghanistan | Deutsche Welle
By Spencer Kimball
A spike in insider attacks on NATO troops by Afghan soldiers and police has threatened to undermine trust between the comrades-in-arms. NATO has begun to resume work with Afghan units after suspending joint patrols.
After a decade of war and just two years before NATO’s 2014 withdrawal deadline, the US-led military coalition and Afghan forces are struggling to maintain confidence in each other amid a rise in insider attacks. NATO has begun to slowly lift a week-long suspension of joint patrols with Afghan security forces, which had been imposed as a consequence of the “green-on-blue” attacks.
FULL ARTICLE (Deutsche Welle)
Photo: The U.S. Army/Flickr

Insider attacks threaten NATO mission in Afghanistan | Deutsche Welle

By Spencer Kimball

A spike in insider attacks on NATO troops by Afghan soldiers and police has threatened to undermine trust between the comrades-in-arms. NATO has begun to resume work with Afghan units after suspending joint patrols.

After a decade of war and just two years before NATO’s 2014 withdrawal deadline, the US-led military coalition and Afghan forces are struggling to maintain confidence in each other amid a rise in insider attacks. NATO has begun to slowly lift a week-long suspension of joint patrols with Afghan security forces, which had been imposed as a consequence of the “green-on-blue” attacks.

FULL ARTICLE (Deutsche Welle)

Photo: The U.S. Army/Flickr