Showing posts tagged as "MENA"

Showing posts tagged MENA

11 Apr
Negotiators at halfway point, move to drafting phase of Iran deal talks | Laura Rozen
Iran and six world powers have advanced through the first phase of comprehensive nuclear talks and are preparing to shift into the next phase of drafting a final deal accord starting at the next meeting in May, negotiators said in Vienna Wednesday.
“We have now held substantive and detailed discussions covering all the issues which will need to be part of a Comprehensive Agreement,” European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said in a joint statement with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif at the conclusion of the third round of talks in Vienna Wednesday.
“A lot of intensive work will be required to overcome the differences which naturally still exist at this stage in the process,” Ashton said, in a statement subsequently delivered by Zarif in Persian.
FULL ARTICLE (Al-Monitor)
Photo: Örlygur Hnefill/Flickr

Negotiators at halfway point, move to drafting phase of Iran deal talks | Laura Rozen

Iran and six world powers have advanced through the first phase of comprehensive nuclear talks and are preparing to shift into the next phase of drafting a final deal accord starting at the next meeting in May, negotiators said in Vienna Wednesday.

“We have now held substantive and detailed discussions covering all the issues which will need to be part of a Comprehensive Agreement,” European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said in a joint statement with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif at the conclusion of the third round of talks in Vienna Wednesday.

“A lot of intensive work will be required to overcome the differences which naturally still exist at this stage in the process,” Ashton said, in a statement subsequently delivered by Zarif in Persian.

FULL ARTICLE (Al-Monitor)

Photo: Örlygur Hnefill/Flickr

26 Mar
'Contagion of polarisation' dominates post-Arab Spring scene | Nadeen Shaker
Pundits studying the Middle East often cite Islamism as the most scathing malaise currently afflicting the region. To Issandr El-Amrani, owner of The Arabist blog and project director of International Crisis Group’s North African Project, however, differences between ruling groups, aside from their ideological beliefs, drive polarisation in post-revolutionary Arab countries.
In a lecture at the American University in Cairo on Wednesday, entitled “Egypt, Libya, Tunisia: From the Contagion of Revolution to the Contagion of Polarisation,” El-Amrani developed the metaphor of “contagion” — adapting the domino effect scenario, in which Arab uprisings contagiously spread — to one where “polarisation”, not revolution, was the final outcome.
FULL ARTICLE (Ahram Online)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Wikimedia Commons

'Contagion of polarisation' dominates post-Arab Spring scene | Nadeen Shaker

Pundits studying the Middle East often cite Islamism as the most scathing malaise currently afflicting the region. To Issandr El-Amrani, owner of The Arabist blog and project director of International Crisis Group’s North African Project, however, differences between ruling groups, aside from their ideological beliefs, drive polarisation in post-revolutionary Arab countries.

In a lecture at the American University in Cairo on Wednesday, entitled “Egypt, Libya, Tunisia: From the Contagion of Revolution to the Contagion of Polarisation,” El-Amrani developed the metaphor of “contagion” — adapting the domino effect scenario, in which Arab uprisings contagiously spread — to one where “polarisation”, not revolution, was the final outcome.

FULL ARTICLE (Ahram Online)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Wikimedia Commons

26 Sep
After Coup and MB Crackdown, Egypt Heads Back to Square One—or Worse | Nadine Marroushi
A state of emergency in place, curfews that begin at 7 p.m. on Fridays, army tanks in the streets, Islamists either dead or in prison, Egypt’s aging former dictator Hosni Mubarak out of jail, a rise in Islamist militant attacks against security targets and the intimidation of journalists and human rights workers: These are some of the developments since June 30 that have left some wondering whether, two and a half years after the uprising that brought Mubarak down, Egypt is in fact going through a counterrevolution.
FULL ARTICLE (World Politics Review)
Photo: Nasser Nouri/Flickr

After Coup and MB Crackdown, Egypt Heads Back to Square One—or Worse | Nadine Marroushi

A state of emergency in place, curfews that begin at 7 p.m. on Fridays, army tanks in the streets, Islamists either dead or in prison, Egypt’s aging former dictator Hosni Mubarak out of jail, a rise in Islamist militant attacks against security targets and the intimidation of journalists and human rights workers: These are some of the developments since June 30 that have left some wondering whether, two and a half years after the uprising that brought Mubarak down, Egypt is in fact going through a counterrevolution.

FULL ARTICLE (World Politics Review)

Photo: Nasser Nouri/Flickr

16 Sep
In Egypt 2013, democracy means military rule | Louisa Loveluck
On a backstreet on the east side of this sprawling city, a ragged crowd chanted in unison: “The people demand the fall of the regime.”
The small group shouted vociferously, united by a desire to oust a repressive ruler and hasten Egypt’s progress to democracy. The “people” have been taking this demand to the streets a lot here in the last two and a half years.
On this Friday last week, the chants were not for the toppling of Hosni Mubarak, as the streets demanded in early 2011 after three decades of corruption and brutality. They were not directed to President Mohamed Morsi, who replaced Mubarak to become the first democratically elected president in the country’s history but was unseated in a military-led takeover after millions went back to the streets to protest failures of governance.
FULL ARTICLE (Global Post)
Photo: Hossam el-Hamalawy/Flickr

In Egypt 2013, democracy means military rule | Louisa Loveluck

On a backstreet on the east side of this sprawling city, a ragged crowd chanted in unison: “The people demand the fall of the regime.”

The small group shouted vociferously, united by a desire to oust a repressive ruler and hasten Egypt’s progress to democracy. The “people” have been taking this demand to the streets a lot here in the last two and a half years.

On this Friday last week, the chants were not for the toppling of Hosni Mubarak, as the streets demanded in early 2011 after three decades of corruption and brutality. They were not directed to President Mohamed Morsi, who replaced Mubarak to become the first democratically elected president in the country’s history but was unseated in a military-led takeover after millions went back to the streets to protest failures of governance.

FULL ARTICLE (Global Post)

Photo: Hossam el-Hamalawy/Flickr

13 Sep
Must it get worse before it gets better? | The Economist
“THE only road to paradise,” runs a joke doing the rounds in the cafés of Tripoli, Libya’s seafront capital, “is the one to the international airport.” Most Libyans still revel in the freedom and sense of possibility brought on by the NATO-backed war that ousted Colonel Muammar Qaddafi two years ago. “Yet before, when someone disappeared, you knew they were with Qaddafi forces,” reminisces a rebel-turned-security man. “Now we have no idea.” That was made clear earlier this month when the government denounced the kidnap of the daughter of Abdullah al-Senussi, Qaddafi’s former spy chief, only to discover that one of its own forces had nabbed her; she was freed a few days later.
FULL ARTICLE (The Economist)
Photo:  EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection/Flickr

Must it get worse before it gets better? | The Economist

“THE only road to paradise,” runs a joke doing the rounds in the cafés of Tripoli, Libya’s seafront capital, “is the one to the international airport.” Most Libyans still revel in the freedom and sense of possibility brought on by the NATO-backed war that ousted Colonel Muammar Qaddafi two years ago. “Yet before, when someone disappeared, you knew they were with Qaddafi forces,” reminisces a rebel-turned-security man. “Now we have no idea.” That was made clear earlier this month when the government denounced the kidnap of the daughter of Abdullah al-Senussi, Qaddafi’s former spy chief, only to discover that one of its own forces had nabbed her; she was freed a few days later.

FULL ARTICLE (The Economist)

Photo:  EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection/Flickr

12 Sep
Are ‘opportunistic armed men’ reviving an Egyptian insurgency? | Louisa Loveluck
 In a cramped Cairo hospital waiting room on Sep. 5, an army lieutenant colonel held a battered copy of a list of names of policemen injured in an assassination attempt against Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim that morning.
The army officer was stationed inside the hospital grounds with dozens of his troops, as part of a large security deployment in the area.
“You want proof that the Muslim Brotherhood are terrorists?” the officer, who gave his name as Alaa, said, brandishing the list.
“Well here it is.” 
The explosion outside Ibrahim’s home in the middle of the afternoon last week killed one person and left 21 injured. 
FULL ARTICLE (NBC News)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Flickr

Are ‘opportunistic armed men’ reviving an Egyptian insurgency? | Louisa Loveluck

 In a cramped Cairo hospital waiting room on Sep. 5, an army lieutenant colonel held a battered copy of a list of names of policemen injured in an assassination attempt against Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim that morning.

The army officer was stationed inside the hospital grounds with dozens of his troops, as part of a large security deployment in the area.

“You want proof that the Muslim Brotherhood are terrorists?” the officer, who gave his name as Alaa, said, brandishing the list.

“Well here it is.” 

The explosion outside Ibrahim’s home in the middle of the afternoon last week killed one person and left 21 injured. 

FULL ARTICLE (NBC News)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Flickr

11 Sep
Egypt announces full-scale assault on Sinai militants | Patrick Kinglsey
Egypt’s army has announced a full-scale assault on militant areas in the restive northern Sinai desert, in what a senior Israeli official has approvingly called Egypt’s first-ever serious counter-terrorism campaign in the region.
Since July, militant Islamist groups in Sinai, the peninsular sandwiched between Egypt and Israel, have killed dozens of police and army officers in an insurgency sparked by anger at ex-president Mohamed Morsi’s July overthrow. A Sinai-based cell also claimed responsibility for last week’s failed assassination attempt on Egypt’s interior minister, and the unrest has been used to justify a brutal state-led crackdown on more moderate and largely peaceful Morsi supporters in Cairo.
FULL ARTICLE (The Guardian)
Photo: Ramy Raoof/Flickr

Egypt announces full-scale assault on Sinai militants | Patrick Kinglsey

Egypt’s army has announced a full-scale assault on militant areas in the restive northern Sinai desert, in what a senior Israeli official has approvingly called Egypt’s first-ever serious counter-terrorism campaign in the region.

Since July, militant Islamist groups in Sinai, the peninsular sandwiched between Egypt and Israel, have killed dozens of police and army officers in an insurgency sparked by anger at ex-president Mohamed Morsi’s July overthrow. A Sinai-based cell also claimed responsibility for last week’s failed assassination attempt on Egypt’s interior minister, and the unrest has been used to justify a brutal state-led crackdown on more moderate and largely peaceful Morsi supporters in Cairo.

FULL ARTICLE (The Guardian)

Photo: Ramy Raoof/Flickr

2 Jul
"He’s working with actors who have acted in this movie before, and the script is built around the same elements. But the theater is new; the region is a completely different place today."

—Robert Blecher, Deputy MENA director, in the New York Timeson Secretary of State John Kerry’s efforts to revive the Middle East peace process.

24 May
"What is finally remarkable about the Middle East’s poorly drawn borders is how durable they are."

—Nathan Thrall, Crisis Group’s Middle East senior analyst, in Tablet Magazine's “The Mideast Crack-Up

28 Aug
Egyptian Leader Adds Rivals of West to Syria Plan | New York Times
By David D. Kirkpatrick
Staking out a new leadership role for Egypt in the shaken landscape of the Arab uprisings, President Mohamed Morsi is reaching out to Iran and other regional powers in an initiative to halt the escalating violence in Syria.
FULL ARTICLE (NYT)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/flickr

Egyptian Leader Adds Rivals of West to Syria Plan | New York Times

By David D. Kirkpatrick

Staking out a new leadership role for Egypt in the shaken landscape of the Arab uprisings, President Mohamed Morsi is reaching out to Iran and other regional powers in an initiative to halt the escalating violence in Syria.

FULL ARTICLE (NYT)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/flickr