Showing posts tagged as "Louise Arbour"

Showing posts tagged Louise Arbour

28 Oct

Louise Arbour on ICC and R2P

By Matthew Waxman 

Louise Arbour, president of the International Crisis Group, delivered a very powerful critique last week of existing doctrines and frameworks for promoting international justice, humanitarian protection, and rule of law. Her tough assessment of the International Criminal Court and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine are especially noteworthy because Arbour, a former Canadian Supreme Court justice, previously served as UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and as Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda.

FULL POST (Lawfare)

22 Oct
Fighting for women’s rights in Afghanistan | Louise Arbour
On April 22, 2013, complying with the verdict of his village’s mullahs, a father publicly executed his daughter in Afghanistan’s northwestern province of Baghdis. The young mother’s alleged crime:  running away with a male cousin while her husband was in Iran. This case, among many others, shows that the Afghan state has failed to protect women from violence. More than twelve years after the Taliban’s ouster, despite international support and the hard work of human rights’ activists, equal protection and equal benefit of the law are notable by their absence for the vast majority of Afghan women. With the international forces rushing to the exits, Kabul’s ability and willingness to protect women could further decline.
FULL ARTICLE (Foreign Policy) 
Photo: Canada in Afghanistan/Canada en Afghanistan /Flickr 

Fighting for women’s rights in Afghanistan | Louise Arbour

On April 22, 2013, complying with the verdict of his village’s mullahs, a father publicly executed his daughter in Afghanistan’s northwestern province of Baghdis. The young mother’s alleged crime:  running away with a male cousin while her husband was in Iran. This case, among many others, shows that the Afghan state has failed to protect women from violence. More than twelve years after the Taliban’s ouster, despite international support and the hard work of human rights’ activists, equal protection and equal benefit of the law are notable by their absence for the vast majority of Afghan women. With the international forces rushing to the exits, Kabul’s ability and willingness to protect women could further decline.

FULL ARTICLE (Foreign Policy) 

Photo: Canada in Afghanistan/Canada en Afghanistan /Flickr 

9 Sep
“Hablar solo de cárcel es simplista y provocador” | Semana
La canadiense Louise Arbour fue alta comisionada de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos y fiscal de los tribunales internacionales para la ex Yugoslavia y Ruanda. Desde 2009 preside el International Crisis Group (ICG), un prestigioso centro de análisis de conflictos. ICG presentó hace unos días el informe Justicia Transicional y los Diálogos de Paz en Colombia con una propuesta concreta sobre el modelo de Justicia Transicional en el país (ver semana.com). Arbour estuvo en Bogotá y habló con esta revista.  
ARTÍCULO COMPLETO (Semana)
Fotografía: Bryan Pocius/Flickr

“Hablar solo de cárcel es simplista y provocador” | Semana

La canadiense Louise Arbour fue alta comisionada de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos y fiscal de los tribunales internacionales para la ex Yugoslavia y Ruanda. Desde 2009 preside el International Crisis Group (ICG), un prestigioso centro de análisis de conflictos. ICG presentó hace unos días el informe Justicia Transicional y los Diálogos de Paz en Colombia con una propuesta concreta sobre el modelo de Justicia Transicional en el país (ver semana.com). Arbour estuvo en Bogotá y habló con esta revista.

ARTÍCULO COMPLETO (Semana)

Fotografía: Bryan Pocius/Flickr

30 Aug

Some shots of yesterday’s Colombia report launch at the Universidad Externado de Colombia. Head to Flickr for the rest. The launch event welcomed a panel of speakers to discuss transitional justice and negotiations for peace in Colombia and featured Crisis Group’s CEO and president, Louise Arbour.

If you have seen it already, be sure to read our new report on transitional justice in Colombia.

20 May
Our President, Louise Arbour, signed this open letter, calling for the end of the taboo “that blocked for so long the debate on more humane and efficient drug policy”. Read in full on the Guardian.
Photo: Flickr/UN Photo Geneva

Our President, Louise Arbour, signed this open letter, calling for the end of the taboo “that blocked for so long the debate on more humane and efficient drug policy”. Read in full on the Guardian.

Photo: Flickr/UN Photo Geneva

3 May
"I believe that we have achieved very high levels of universal norms enunciation, in legal instruments, in our literature. I think the normative environment is very impressive. The disconnect is between the norms and their enforcement."

—Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

2 May

We have to take a step back, first of all, and not purport to impose our own system of values and so on. If we are true democrats, I think our first obligation is to defer to the people who have their own set of aspirations and values.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

We have to take a step back, first of all, and not purport to impose our own system of values and so on. If we are true democrats, I think our first obligation is to defer to the people who have their own set of aspirations and values.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

Women, certainly in our day and age, have much more capacity to understand that there is something noble about attending to your daily needs. You may not build cathedrals, but every day you feed your children, you clean your house. This is part of the human condition.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs


We have to accept that we will live with conflict. We cannot aspire to eradicating it. Conflict comes from competition for access to resources, particularly in a world in which the institutions are not geared to an equitable distribution of resources and of wealth. So we will have conflict. The question is how to appease conflict, resolve it, without recourse to deadly, violent interaction.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Photo: svenwerk/Flickr

We have to accept that we will live with conflict. We cannot aspire to eradicating it. Conflict comes from competition for access to resources, particularly in a world in which the institutions are not geared to an equitable distribution of resources and of wealth. So we will have conflict. The question is how to appease conflict, resolve it, without recourse to deadly, violent interaction.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

Photo: svenwerk/Flickr

"The management of conflict is a daily task—conflict within peoples, within families, within communities, and then within broader communities of people who have different cultural aspirations, different religious affiliations. To think that we would eradicate the tensions that come from the sense of belonging to communities, to different cultural groups, I think is extremely unrealistic. The question is to build the tools and the institutions for the peaceful management of conflict, not some idea that conflict altogether would disappear."

—Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs