Showing posts tagged as "Libya"

Showing posts tagged Libya

3 Apr
Check out this month’s issue of CrisisWatch as an interactive map! Conflict situations deteriorated in Libya, Central African Republic, Ukraine, and Yemen, while conditions improved in the Philippines. http://bit.ly/16WsmPX

Check out this month’s issue of CrisisWatch as an interactive map! Conflict situations deteriorated in Libya, Central African Republic, Ukraine, and Yemen, while conditions improved in the Philippines. http://bit.ly/16WsmPX

26 Mar
'Contagion of polarisation' dominates post-Arab Spring scene | Nadeen Shaker
Pundits studying the Middle East often cite Islamism as the most scathing malaise currently afflicting the region. To Issandr El-Amrani, owner of The Arabist blog and project director of International Crisis Group’s North African Project, however, differences between ruling groups, aside from their ideological beliefs, drive polarisation in post-revolutionary Arab countries.
In a lecture at the American University in Cairo on Wednesday, entitled “Egypt, Libya, Tunisia: From the Contagion of Revolution to the Contagion of Polarisation,” El-Amrani developed the metaphor of “contagion” — adapting the domino effect scenario, in which Arab uprisings contagiously spread — to one where “polarisation”, not revolution, was the final outcome.
FULL ARTICLE (Ahram Online)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Wikimedia Commons

'Contagion of polarisation' dominates post-Arab Spring scene | Nadeen Shaker

Pundits studying the Middle East often cite Islamism as the most scathing malaise currently afflicting the region. To Issandr El-Amrani, owner of The Arabist blog and project director of International Crisis Group’s North African Project, however, differences between ruling groups, aside from their ideological beliefs, drive polarisation in post-revolutionary Arab countries.

In a lecture at the American University in Cairo on Wednesday, entitled “Egypt, Libya, Tunisia: From the Contagion of Revolution to the Contagion of Polarisation,” El-Amrani developed the metaphor of “contagion” — adapting the domino effect scenario, in which Arab uprisings contagiously spread — to one where “polarisation”, not revolution, was the final outcome.

FULL ARTICLE (Ahram Online)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Wikimedia Commons

20 Feb
Disillusionment in Libya Over Vote on Charter Assembly | Carlotta Gall
For the second time since the overthrow of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi two and a half years ago, Libyans are being asked to go to the polls to elect lawmakers responsible for preparing a new constitution. On Thursday, increasingly frustrated voters will directly elect a 60-member assembly to draft the charter after Parliament failed to appoint the body as originally planned.
“People are saying: ‘What happened?’ ” said Claudia Gazzini, a senior analyst for the International Crisis Group who is based in Libya. Disillusioned with the lack of progress, Libyans are disinclined to come out and vote, she said. “They are saying: ‘I’m not going to dip my hand in the ink this time.’ ”
Precious little has been achieved in Libya since the war that killed Colonel Qaddafi and ended his 42 years of autocratic rule. The country held its first free elections amid much euphoria in 2012, creating a General National Congress that then appointed a new government.
FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)
Photo:  United Nations Development Programme/flickr

Disillusionment in Libya Over Vote on Charter Assembly | Carlotta Gall

For the second time since the overthrow of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi two and a half years ago, Libyans are being asked to go to the polls to elect lawmakers responsible for preparing a new constitution. On Thursday, increasingly frustrated voters will directly elect a 60-member assembly to draft the charter after Parliament failed to appoint the body as originally planned.

“People are saying: ‘What happened?’ ” said Claudia Gazzini, a senior analyst for the International Crisis Group who is based in Libya. Disillusioned with the lack of progress, Libyans are disinclined to come out and vote, she said. “They are saying: ‘I’m not going to dip my hand in the ink this time.’ ”

Precious little has been achieved in Libya since the war that killed Colonel Qaddafi and ended his 42 years of autocratic rule. The country held its first free elections amid much euphoria in 2012, creating a General National Congress that then appointed a new government.

FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)

Photo:  United Nations Development Programme/flickr

3 Feb
Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

17 Dec

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18 Nov
Libyan PM urges militias to leave Tripoli after violence erupts | Borzou Daragahi
Libya’s embattled prime minister Ali Zidane on Saturday called on all armed groups other than the uniformed police and army to leave the capital a day after self-described revolutionary brigades opened fire on mostly unarmed protesters, leaving at least 43 people dead and 400 injured.
Fresh clashes between rival militia groups from the capital, Tripoli, those with roots in Libya’s number three city of Misurata broke out in the city, leaving at least one dead. The Libyan capital appeared close to the brink of a complete breakdown in security amid reports that militias from Misurata had shelled the eastern Tripoli suburb of Tajoura, plundered an army base there and made off with weapons and ammunition.
FULL ARTICLE (Financial Times) 
Photo: Matchbox Media Collective/Flickr

Libyan PM urges militias to leave Tripoli after violence erupts | Borzou Daragahi

Libya’s embattled prime minister Ali Zidane on Saturday called on all armed groups other than the uniformed police and army to leave the capital a day after self-described revolutionary brigades opened fire on mostly unarmed protesters, leaving at least 43 people dead and 400 injured.

Fresh clashes between rival militia groups from the capital, Tripoli, those with roots in Libya’s number three city of Misurata broke out in the city, leaving at least one dead. The Libyan capital appeared close to the brink of a complete breakdown in security amid reports that militias from Misurata had shelled the eastern Tripoli suburb of Tajoura, plundered an army base there and made off with weapons and ammunition.

FULL ARTICLE (Financial Times) 

Photo: Matchbox Media Collective/Flickr

6 Nov
Libyan Federalists Raise Tensions | Jamie Dettmer
Tensions in Libya are rising this week after federalism advocates in oil-rich eastern Libya have announced the formation of their own regional administration.
Sunday in the town of Ajdabiya, 150 kilometers south of Benghazi, Ibrahim Jathran and other federalist leaders accused the central government of Prime Minister Ali Zeidan of “incompetence and corruption.”   Jathran, a former head of Libya’s Petroleum Protection Force turned on Zeidan earlier this year by using the force, which is largely made up of militias, to seize the country’s biggest oil-exporting ports Ras Lanuf and Es-Sider.
Federalist leaders who named a prime minister and a 24-member cabinet say that since the ouster of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, Zeidan’s government and the Libyan parliament known as  the General National Congress have failed the country, and especially eastern Libya which they call by its traditional name of Cyrenaica. 
FULL ARTICLE (VOA News) 
Photo: Crethi Plethi/Flickr 

Libyan Federalists Raise Tensions | Jamie Dettmer

Tensions in Libya are rising this week after federalism advocates in oil-rich eastern Libya have announced the formation of their own regional administration.

Sunday in the town of Ajdabiya, 150 kilometers south of Benghazi, Ibrahim Jathran and other federalist leaders accused the central government of Prime Minister Ali Zeidan of “incompetence and corruption.”   Jathran, a former head of Libya’s Petroleum Protection Force turned on Zeidan earlier this year by using the force, which is largely made up of militias, to seize the country’s biggest oil-exporting ports Ras Lanuf and Es-Sider.

Federalist leaders who named a prime minister and a 24-member cabinet say that since the ouster of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, Zeidan’s government and the Libyan parliament known as  the General National Congress have failed the country, and especially eastern Libya which they call by its traditional name of Cyrenaica. 

FULL ARTICLE (VOA News) 

Photo: Crethi Plethi/Flickr 

15 Oct
What next for Al-Shabaab? | Global Public Square
Do the two U.S. raids in Africa this month signal a shift from drone attacks?
It’s not possible to tell at this point. The two raids underscore one limitation of drones: they cannot be used in urban settings where the possibility of killing civilians is very high. This would not only violate international humanitarian law, but would be counter-productive, since it would turn the population against the United States and its allies and possibly radicalize others into joining jihadi groups like Al-Shabaab.
FULL ARTICLE (CNN)
Photo: expertinfanty/Flickr

What next for Al-Shabaab? | Global Public Square

Do the two U.S. raids in Africa this month signal a shift from drone attacks?

It’s not possible to tell at this point. The two raids underscore one limitation of drones: they cannot be used in urban settings where the possibility of killing civilians is very high. This would not only violate international humanitarian law, but would be counter-productive, since it would turn the population against the United States and its allies and possibly radicalize others into joining jihadi groups like Al-Shabaab.

FULL ARTICLE (CNN)

Photo: expertinfanty/Flickr

13 Sep
Must it get worse before it gets better? | The Economist
“THE only road to paradise,” runs a joke doing the rounds in the cafés of Tripoli, Libya’s seafront capital, “is the one to the international airport.” Most Libyans still revel in the freedom and sense of possibility brought on by the NATO-backed war that ousted Colonel Muammar Qaddafi two years ago. “Yet before, when someone disappeared, you knew they were with Qaddafi forces,” reminisces a rebel-turned-security man. “Now we have no idea.” That was made clear earlier this month when the government denounced the kidnap of the daughter of Abdullah al-Senussi, Qaddafi’s former spy chief, only to discover that one of its own forces had nabbed her; she was freed a few days later.
FULL ARTICLE (The Economist)
Photo:  EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection/Flickr

Must it get worse before it gets better? | The Economist

“THE only road to paradise,” runs a joke doing the rounds in the cafés of Tripoli, Libya’s seafront capital, “is the one to the international airport.” Most Libyans still revel in the freedom and sense of possibility brought on by the NATO-backed war that ousted Colonel Muammar Qaddafi two years ago. “Yet before, when someone disappeared, you knew they were with Qaddafi forces,” reminisces a rebel-turned-security man. “Now we have no idea.” That was made clear earlier this month when the government denounced the kidnap of the daughter of Abdullah al-Senussi, Qaddafi’s former spy chief, only to discover that one of its own forces had nabbed her; she was freed a few days later.

FULL ARTICLE (The Economist)

Photo:  EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection/Flickr

7 Jun

Watch Crisis Group’s North Africa Project Director, William Lawrence, discuss Libya and Tunisia on France 24.