Showing posts tagged as "Libya"

Showing posts tagged Libya

20 Aug
Tunisia’s Border Dilemma | Adel Al-Nouqti
Tunis, Asharq Al-Awsat—Like all border zones across the world, Tunisia’s borders have never been completely secured. But the nature of problems along Tunisia’s southern border with Libya and western border with Algeria have seen radical shifts in recent years, mainly due to the political developments that have taken place both in Tunisia and its neighboring states.
Tunisia itself witnessed massive political changes after the fall of former President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali on January 14, 2011 while turmoil also ripped through Libya in the aftermath of the ouster of dictator Muammar Gaddafi, also in 2011. In the western part of Tunisia, fierce clashes with armed militias positioned in the mountainous area along the border with Algeria have resulted in the deaths of more than 50 Tunisian military and security officers. As for its southern border with Libya, the flow of smuggled weapons has increased, bringing increased concerns over security.
Tunisia’s national economy has been a major casualty of its porous borders. Smuggling from Libya and Algeria costs Tunisia over one billion US dollars every year, a study prepared by the International Monetary Fund revealed.
FULL ARTICLE (Asharq Al-Awsat)
Photo: Richard Mortel/flickr

Tunisia’s Border Dilemma | Adel Al-Nouqti

Tunis, Asharq Al-Awsat—Like all border zones across the world, Tunisia’s borders have never been completely secured. But the nature of problems along Tunisia’s southern border with Libya and western border with Algeria have seen radical shifts in recent years, mainly due to the political developments that have taken place both in Tunisia and its neighboring states.

Tunisia itself witnessed massive political changes after the fall of former President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali on January 14, 2011 while turmoil also ripped through Libya in the aftermath of the ouster of dictator Muammar Gaddafi, also in 2011. In the western part of Tunisia, fierce clashes with armed militias positioned in the mountainous area along the border with Algeria have resulted in the deaths of more than 50 Tunisian military and security officers. As for its southern border with Libya, the flow of smuggled weapons has increased, bringing increased concerns over security.

Tunisia’s national economy has been a major casualty of its porous borders. Smuggling from Libya and Algeria costs Tunisia over one billion US dollars every year, a study prepared by the International Monetary Fund revealed.

FULL ARTICLE (Asharq Al-Awsat)

Photo: Richard Mortel/flickr

29 Jul
Still Torn by Factional Fighting, Post-Revolt Libya Is Coming Undone | Kareem Fahim
CAIRO — For weeks, rival Libyan militias had been pounding one another’s positions with artillery, mortar rounds and rockets in a desperate fight to control the international airport in the capital, Tripoli. Then suddenly, early Saturday morning, the fighting just stopped.
The pause came as United States military warplanes circled overhead, providing air cover for a predawn evacuation of the American Embassy’s staff. Apparently fearing the planes, the militias held their fire just long enough for the ambassador and her staff to reach the Tunisian border — a reminder to Libyans of how even their most powerful allies were incapable of putting out their incendiary feuds.
FULL ARTICLE (The New York Times)
Photo: Kadir Aksoy/flickr

Still Torn by Factional Fighting, Post-Revolt Libya Is Coming Undone | Kareem Fahim

CAIRO — For weeks, rival Libyan militias had been pounding one another’s positions with artillery, mortar rounds and rockets in a desperate fight to control the international airport in the capital, Tripoli. Then suddenly, early Saturday morning, the fighting just stopped.

The pause came as United States military warplanes circled overhead, providing air cover for a predawn evacuation of the American Embassy’s staff. Apparently fearing the planes, the militias held their fire just long enough for the ambassador and her staff to reach the Tunisian border — a reminder to Libyans of how even their most powerful allies were incapable of putting out their incendiary feuds.

FULL ARTICLE (The New York Times)

Photo: Kadir Aksoy/flickr

2 Jun
Obama’s counterterrorism doctrine: Let locals lead the fight | David Rohde
In a foreign policy address this week, U.S. President Barack Obama gave his clearest outline yet of his counterterrorism strategy. Al Qaeda splinter groups remain the largest threat to the United States, he said, but Washington must respond to it in a new way: by training local security forces, not deploying American ground troops.
“We have to develop a strategy that matches this diffuse threat - one that expands our reach without sending forces that stretch our military too thin, or stir up local resentments,” Obama said. “We need partners to fight terrorists alongside us.”
But critics say America’s past efforts to train local security forces have had mixed results. Washington has a poor track record of applying the long-term resources, funding and attention needed to carry out such efforts successfully.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan/flickr

Obama’s counterterrorism doctrine: Let locals lead the fight | David Rohde

In a foreign policy address this week, U.S. President Barack Obama gave his clearest outline yet of his counterterrorism strategy. Al Qaeda splinter groups remain the largest threat to the United States, he said, but Washington must respond to it in a new way: by training local security forces, not deploying American ground troops.

“We have to develop a strategy that matches this diffuse threat - one that expands our reach without sending forces that stretch our military too thin, or stir up local resentments,” Obama said. “We need partners to fight terrorists alongside us.”

But critics say America’s past efforts to train local security forces have had mixed results. Washington has a poor track record of applying the long-term resources, funding and attention needed to carry out such efforts successfully.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan/flickr

20 May
Too Early To Cry ‘Coup’ in Libya | Michael Pizzi
The violence gripping the streets of Libya’s two major cities may be the early stages of a military coup attempt echoing events in Egypt last summer, or simply an escalation of feuding between rival militias that have run the show since the overthrow of Col. Muammar Gaddafi. In either case, this week’s fighting — some of the worst since the country’s 2011 uprising — has prompted speculation Libya could be sliding back into civil war.
Forces loyal to retired Libyan General Khalifa Haftar on Sunday stormed Libya’s parliament, declared it dissolved, and then clashed with militias backing the fragile Islamist-led central government, just days after Haftar launched an offensive in the eastern port city of Benghazi. On Monday, the commander of the Libyan army’s special forces announced he had allied with Haftar, who claims his so-called Libyan National Army is fighting to stamp out extremism and Al-Qaeda-inspired militias in Libya “by the people’s choice.” An air force base in the city of Tobruk followed suit.
"We are joining the battle of ‘dignity’ launched by the Libyan National Army with all our men and weapons," said Col. Wanis Abu Khamada.
But the Libyan radical group Ansar al-Sharia, which has been labeled a “terrorist” organization by the United States, vowed Tuesday to defend its stronghold against the Libyan National Army and other allied forces. The group has called the deadly offensive in Benghazi “a war against … Islam orchestrated by the United States and its Arab allies,” according to the Agence France-Presse news agency.
FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera)
Photo: Magharebia/flickr

Too Early To Cry ‘Coup’ in Libya | Michael Pizzi

The violence gripping the streets of Libya’s two major cities may be the early stages of a military coup attempt echoing events in Egypt last summer, or simply an escalation of feuding between rival militias that have run the show since the overthrow of Col. Muammar Gaddafi. In either case, this week’s fighting — some of the worst since the country’s 2011 uprising — has prompted speculation Libya could be sliding back into civil war.

Forces loyal to retired Libyan General Khalifa Haftar on Sunday stormed Libya’s parliament, declared it dissolved, and then clashed with militias backing the fragile Islamist-led central government, just days after Haftar launched an offensive in the eastern port city of Benghazi. On Monday, the commander of the Libyan army’s special forces announced he had allied with Haftar, who claims his so-called Libyan National Army is fighting to stamp out extremism and Al-Qaeda-inspired militias in Libya “by the people’s choice.” An air force base in the city of Tobruk followed suit.

"We are joining the battle of ‘dignity’ launched by the Libyan National Army with all our men and weapons," said Col. Wanis Abu Khamada.

But the Libyan radical group Ansar al-Sharia, which has been labeled a “terrorist” organization by the United States, vowed Tuesday to defend its stronghold against the Libyan National Army and other allied forces. The group has called the deadly offensive in Benghazi “a war against … Islam orchestrated by the United States and its Arab allies,” according to the Agence France-Presse news agency.

FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera)

Photo: Magharebia/flickr

7 May

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3 Apr
Check out this month’s issue of CrisisWatch as an interactive map! Conflict situations deteriorated in Libya, Central African Republic, Ukraine, and Yemen, while conditions improved in the Philippines. http://bit.ly/16WsmPX

Check out this month’s issue of CrisisWatch as an interactive map! Conflict situations deteriorated in Libya, Central African Republic, Ukraine, and Yemen, while conditions improved in the Philippines. http://bit.ly/16WsmPX

26 Mar
'Contagion of polarisation' dominates post-Arab Spring scene | Nadeen Shaker
Pundits studying the Middle East often cite Islamism as the most scathing malaise currently afflicting the region. To Issandr El-Amrani, owner of The Arabist blog and project director of International Crisis Group’s North African Project, however, differences between ruling groups, aside from their ideological beliefs, drive polarisation in post-revolutionary Arab countries.
In a lecture at the American University in Cairo on Wednesday, entitled “Egypt, Libya, Tunisia: From the Contagion of Revolution to the Contagion of Polarisation,” El-Amrani developed the metaphor of “contagion” — adapting the domino effect scenario, in which Arab uprisings contagiously spread — to one where “polarisation”, not revolution, was the final outcome.
FULL ARTICLE (Ahram Online)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Wikimedia Commons

'Contagion of polarisation' dominates post-Arab Spring scene | Nadeen Shaker

Pundits studying the Middle East often cite Islamism as the most scathing malaise currently afflicting the region. To Issandr El-Amrani, owner of The Arabist blog and project director of International Crisis Group’s North African Project, however, differences between ruling groups, aside from their ideological beliefs, drive polarisation in post-revolutionary Arab countries.

In a lecture at the American University in Cairo on Wednesday, entitled “Egypt, Libya, Tunisia: From the Contagion of Revolution to the Contagion of Polarisation,” El-Amrani developed the metaphor of “contagion” — adapting the domino effect scenario, in which Arab uprisings contagiously spread — to one where “polarisation”, not revolution, was the final outcome.

FULL ARTICLE (Ahram Online)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Wikimedia Commons

20 Feb
Disillusionment in Libya Over Vote on Charter Assembly | Carlotta Gall
For the second time since the overthrow of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi two and a half years ago, Libyans are being asked to go to the polls to elect lawmakers responsible for preparing a new constitution. On Thursday, increasingly frustrated voters will directly elect a 60-member assembly to draft the charter after Parliament failed to appoint the body as originally planned.
“People are saying: ‘What happened?’ ” said Claudia Gazzini, a senior analyst for the International Crisis Group who is based in Libya. Disillusioned with the lack of progress, Libyans are disinclined to come out and vote, she said. “They are saying: ‘I’m not going to dip my hand in the ink this time.’ ”
Precious little has been achieved in Libya since the war that killed Colonel Qaddafi and ended his 42 years of autocratic rule. The country held its first free elections amid much euphoria in 2012, creating a General National Congress that then appointed a new government.
FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)
Photo:  United Nations Development Programme/flickr

Disillusionment in Libya Over Vote on Charter Assembly | Carlotta Gall

For the second time since the overthrow of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi two and a half years ago, Libyans are being asked to go to the polls to elect lawmakers responsible for preparing a new constitution. On Thursday, increasingly frustrated voters will directly elect a 60-member assembly to draft the charter after Parliament failed to appoint the body as originally planned.

“People are saying: ‘What happened?’ ” said Claudia Gazzini, a senior analyst for the International Crisis Group who is based in Libya. Disillusioned with the lack of progress, Libyans are disinclined to come out and vote, she said. “They are saying: ‘I’m not going to dip my hand in the ink this time.’ ”

Precious little has been achieved in Libya since the war that killed Colonel Qaddafi and ended his 42 years of autocratic rule. The country held its first free elections amid much euphoria in 2012, creating a General National Congress that then appointed a new government.

FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)

Photo:  United Nations Development Programme/flickr

3 Feb
Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

17 Dec

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