Showing posts tagged as "Japan"

Showing posts tagged Japan

24 Jul
Old Scores and New Grudges: Evolving Sino-Japanese Tensions
Beijing/Tokyo/Brussels  |   24 Jul 2014
The deterioration in relations between China and Japan has spiraled beyond an island sovereignty dispute and risks an armed conflict neither wants. A November regional summit is a fence-mending opportunity – if the two countries’ leaders rise above nationalism and manage multiple flashpoints.
Politically viable options to bridge the wide gap on the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands dispute remain elusive. New frictions have arisen: China’s declaration of an Air Defence Identification Zone (ADIZ) above the East China Sea deepened Tokyo’s anxiety that it desires both territory and a new regional order; Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to the Yasukuni Shrine and statements that suggest a retreat from past apologies for the Second World War atrocities reopened old wounds. Asia’s two most powerful countries increasingly prioritise defence build-up over diplomacy. Their law-enforcement vessels, navies and military planes engage in frequent and risky encounters at sea and in the air. Old Scores and New Grudges: Evolving Sino-Japanese Tensions, Crisis Group’s second report on the deteriorating relationship, analyses events, actors and dynamics that complicate ties and impede diplomacy.
The report’s major findings and recommendations are:
China should instruct the People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) navy and air force to refrain from risk-seeking and avoid collisions during patrol, exercise and surveillance. Japan, in turn, should instruct its Maritime and Air Self-Defence Forces (SDF) to take extra caution to avoid collisions or conflict with the PLA.
Japan should continue to urge resumption of the multi-agency, high-level bilateral maritime affairs consultation process and operationalisation of a defence agency communications mechanism. China should drop political conditions for such actions. Both countries should prioritise implementing the non-binding Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea (CUES) they have agreed on.
China and Japan should establish hotlines between their coast guards, and between the National Security Council (Japan) and the National Security Commission (China), and ensure that those in charge have authority to speedily reach decision-makers and frontline personnel in an emergency.
“China should calm anti-Japan rhetoric, delink wartime history from the islands dispute and open senior political channels to Japan” says China Analyst Yanmei Xie. “Japan should avoid actions and comments suggesting revisionist history views”.
“November’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit is a chance for the two leaders to meet and smooth troubled waters”, says Daniel Pinkston, North East Asia Deputy Project Director. “Both countries should seize it”.
FULL REPORT

Old Scores and New Grudges: Evolving Sino-Japanese Tensions

Beijing/Tokyo/Brussels  |   24 Jul 2014

The deterioration in relations between China and Japan has spiraled beyond an island sovereignty dispute and risks an armed conflict neither wants. A November regional summit is a fence-mending opportunity – if the two countries’ leaders rise above nationalism and manage multiple flashpoints.

Politically viable options to bridge the wide gap on the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands dispute remain elusive. New frictions have arisen: China’s declaration of an Air Defence Identification Zone (ADIZ) above the East China Sea deepened Tokyo’s anxiety that it desires both territory and a new regional order; Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to the Yasukuni Shrine and statements that suggest a retreat from past apologies for the Second World War atrocities reopened old wounds. Asia’s two most powerful countries increasingly prioritise defence build-up over diplomacy. Their law-enforcement vessels, navies and military planes engage in frequent and risky encounters at sea and in the air. Old Scores and New Grudges: Evolving Sino-Japanese Tensions, Crisis Group’s second report on the deteriorating relationship, analyses events, actors and dynamics that complicate ties and impede diplomacy.

The report’s major findings and recommendations are:

  • China should instruct the People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) navy and air force to refrain from risk-seeking and avoid collisions during patrol, exercise and surveillance. Japan, in turn, should instruct its Maritime and Air Self-Defence Forces (SDF) to take extra caution to avoid collisions or conflict with the PLA.
  • Japan should continue to urge resumption of the multi-agency, high-level bilateral maritime affairs consultation process and operationalisation of a defence agency communications mechanism. China should drop political conditions for such actions. Both countries should prioritise implementing the non-binding Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea (CUES) they have agreed on.
  • China and Japan should establish hotlines between their coast guards, and between the National Security Council (Japan) and the National Security Commission (China), and ensure that those in charge have authority to speedily reach decision-makers and frontline personnel in an emergency.

“China should calm anti-Japan rhetoric, delink wartime history from the islands dispute and open senior political channels to Japan” says China Analyst Yanmei Xie. “Japan should avoid actions and comments suggesting revisionist history views”.

“November’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit is a chance for the two leaders to meet and smooth troubled waters”, says Daniel Pinkston, North East Asia Deputy Project Director. “Both countries should seize it”.

FULL REPORT

23 Jan
Obama’s Asia rebalance turns into headache as China, Japan relations spiral down | Simon Denyer
China and Japan are not talking any more, and the United States is hardly being listened to.
A dispute over a remote chain of islands in the East China Sea has spiraled into an increasingly dangerous standoff between Beijing and Tokyo in the last few weeks, deeply complicating President Obama’s attempts to forge closer partnerships in the region.
Beijing recently announced that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was simply not welcome there. At the same time, the media in both countries have stoked the fire with speculation about a possible military confrontation that could even suck in the United States, which is bound by treaty to defend Japan in case of attack.
U.S. officials and experts say conflict between the Asian powers remains unlikely, with both sides keen to preserve economic ties, and neither likely to emerge as a clear winner.
FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)
Photo: Asitimes/flickr

Obama’s Asia rebalance turns into headache as China, Japan relations spiral down | Simon Denyer

China and Japan are not talking any more, and the United States is hardly being listened to.

A dispute over a remote chain of islands in the East China Sea has spiraled into an increasingly dangerous standoff between Beijing and Tokyo in the last few weeks, deeply complicating President Obama’s attempts to forge closer partnerships in the region.

Beijing recently announced that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was simply not welcome there. At the same time, the media in both countries have stoked the fire with speculation about a possible military confrontation that could even suck in the United States, which is bound by treaty to defend Japan in case of attack.

U.S. officials and experts say conflict between the Asian powers remains unlikely, with both sides keen to preserve economic ties, and neither likely to emerge as a clear winner.

FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)

Photo: Asitimes/flickr

4 Dec
China’s air defense zone: What you need to know | Jason Miks
GPS speaks with International Crisis Group analyst Yanmei Xie about recent tensions in East Asia, China’s air defense identification zone, and what it means for U.S. ties with Beijing.
What exactly is the air defense identification zone that China has announced?
The air defense identification zone, announced last month, covers a set of islands – called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan – whose sovereignty is hotly disputed by the two countries. Beijing has demanded that from now on, aircraft entering the zone have to report their flight plans, maintain communication and show identification, or “China’s armed forces will adopt defensive emergency measures to respond.”
FULL ARTICLE (CNN)
Photo: Al Jazeera English/Flickr

China’s air defense zone: What you need to know | Jason Miks

GPS speaks with International Crisis Group analyst Yanmei Xie about recent tensions in East Asia, China’s air defense identification zone, and what it means for U.S. ties with Beijing.

What exactly is the air defense identification zone that China has announced?

The air defense identification zone, announced last month, covers a set of islands – called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan – whose sovereignty is hotly disputed by the two countries. Beijing has demanded that from now on, aircraft entering the zone have to report their flight plans, maintain communication and show identification, or “China’s armed forces will adopt defensive emergency measures to respond.”

FULL ARTICLE (CNN)

Photo: Al Jazeera English/Flickr

1 Jul
"But this is only a first step, and there is a long way before an effective code can be developed and implemented. Beijing has a record of suspending talks as soon as tensions with rival claimant countries flare — precisely when talks are most needed." — Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Northeast Asia Director
FULL ARTICLE (CNN)
Photo: U.S. Navy

"But this is only a first step, and there is a long way before an effective code can be developed and implemented. Beijing has a record of suspending talks as soon as tensions with rival claimant countries flare — precisely when talks are most needed." — Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Northeast Asia Director

FULL ARTICLE (CNN)

Photo: U.S. Navy

30 Apr
Watch Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Crisis Group’s North East Asia Project Director and China Adviser, discuss Japanese and Russian relations on Al Jazeera English Inside Story

Watch Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Crisis Group’s North East Asia Project Director and China Adviser, discuss Japanese and Russian relations on Al Jazeera English Inside Story

8 Apr
"Despite expressions by both governments that they wish to avoid a war, potential for escalation has increased and there is deepening pessimism on both sides over the prospects of a peaceful settlement."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, “Dangerous Waters: China-Japan Relations on the Rocks

30 Jan
Is Asia on cusp of space race? | CNN
By Ramy Inocencio
Hong Kong (CNN) — The United States and Russia defined the world’s first space race, but following South Korea’s successful orbital rocket launch this week, it appears Asia — particularly North Asia — is the world’s new epicenter for space rivalries in the 21st century.
"In some sense we are already there," says Daniel Pinkston, North East Asia Deputy Project Director for International Crisis Group in Seoul, South Korea. "The Chinese have been very active… (also) Japan, North and South Korea. It’s quite a competitive atmosphere."
FULL ARTICLE (CNN)
Photo: Gang Lee/Wikimedia Commons 

Is Asia on cusp of space race? | CNN

By Ramy Inocencio

Hong Kong (CNN) — The United States and Russia defined the world’s first space race, but following South Korea’s successful orbital rocket launch this week, it appears Asia — particularly North Asia — is the world’s new epicenter for space rivalries in the 21st century.

"In some sense we are already there," says Daniel Pinkston, North East Asia Deputy Project Director for International Crisis Group in Seoul, South Korea. "The Chinese have been very active… (also) Japan, North and South Korea. It’s quite a competitive atmosphere."

FULL ARTICLE (CNN)

Photo: Gang Lee/Wikimedia Commons 

15 Jan
China to survey islands disputed with Japan | AFP
By Kelly Olsen
Beijing is to carry out a geographical survey of islands in the East China Sea, state media said on Tuesday, the latest salvo in an increasingly tense dispute with Tokyo over the uninhabited territory.
FULL ARTICLE (AFP)
Photo: Okinawa Soba/Flickr

China to survey islands disputed with Japan | AFP

By Kelly Olsen

Beijing is to carry out a geographical survey of islands in the East China Sea, state media said on Tuesday, the latest salvo in an increasingly tense dispute with Tokyo over the uninhabited territory.

FULL ARTICLE (AFP)

Photo: Okinawa Soba/Flickr

9 Jan
A Dangerous Escalation in the East China Sea | Wall Street Journal
By Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Crisis Group’s North East Asia Project Director
The territorial dispute in the East China Sea between the world’s second- and third-largest economies entered a disturbing new phase last month with the first direct involvement of military forces. On Dec. 13, Japan sent eight F-15 fighter jets after a small Chinese propeller plane that flew over the disputed Senkaku Islands, called Diaoyu in China. According to Japan, this was the first Chinese intrusion into its airspace since 1958.
FULL ARTICLE (WSJ) (paywall)
Photo: Al Jazeera English/Flickr

A Dangerous Escalation in the East China Sea | Wall Street Journal

By Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Crisis Group’s North East Asia Project Director

The territorial dispute in the East China Sea between the world’s second- and third-largest economies entered a disturbing new phase last month with the first direct involvement of military forces. On Dec. 13, Japan sent eight F-15 fighter jets after a small Chinese propeller plane that flew over the disputed Senkaku Islands, called Diaoyu in China. According to Japan, this was the first Chinese intrusion into its airspace since 1958.

FULL ARTICLE (WSJ) (paywall)

Photo: Al Jazeera English/Flickr

31 Oct
"Après un face-à-face de deux mois entre navires philippins et chinois, c’est désormais du côté du Japon et des îles Senkaku/Diaoyu que se déploient les rivalités. A la mi-octobre, la marine chinoise s’est approchée des côtes contestées lors de manœuvres militaires, tandis que le porte-avions américain « USS George-Washington » faisait une démonstration de force en mer de Chine méridionale."

—tiré de « Guerre des nationalismes en mer de Chine » un article par Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, responsable du département Chine et Asie du Nord-Est de l’International Crisis Group, dans Le Monde diplomatique