Showing posts tagged as "Jakarta"

Showing posts tagged Jakarta

18 Jun
Indonesia’s police: The problem of deadly force | Lowy Interpreter
by Jim Della-Giacoma, Asia Program Director
My four year-old daughter recently came home from her Jakarta kindergarten with a story about a visit to the school from the head of our local police station. ‘If there is a robber and he’s running away, the policeman will pull out his gun, fire in the air, and if he doesn’t stop then he will shoot him in the leg’, she recounted breathlessly.
I have spent 25 years working in and around conflict zones, including more than a decade in Indonesia. My reaction might not have been that of the average parent. ‘That’, I replied, ‘is a violation of Perkap Number 8.’ Needless to say, my reference to Police Regulation Number 8 of 2009 regarding Implementation of Human Rights Principles and Standards in the Discharge of Duties of the Indonesian National Police was lost on her. She thought the visit was great.
FULL ARTICLE (Lowy Interpreter)
Photo: Satu Lagi/Flickr

Indonesia’s police: The problem of deadly force | Lowy Interpreter

by Jim Della-Giacoma, Asia Program Director

My four year-old daughter recently came home from her Jakarta kindergarten with a story about a visit to the school from the head of our local police station. ‘If there is a robber and he’s running away, the policeman will pull out his gun, fire in the air, and if he doesn’t stop then he will shoot him in the leg’, she recounted breathlessly.

I have spent 25 years working in and around conflict zones, including more than a decade in Indonesia. My reaction might not have been that of the average parent. ‘That’, I replied, ‘is a violation of Perkap Number 8.’ Needless to say, my reference to Police Regulation Number 8 of 2009 regarding Implementation of Human Rights Principles and Standards in the Discharge of Duties of the Indonesian National Police was lost on her. She thought the visit was great.

FULL ARTICLE (Lowy Interpreter)

Photo: Satu Lagi/Flickr

16 Nov
Poso struggles for religious peace | The Jakarta Post
By Bagus BT Saragih and Ruslan Sangadji
It was a beautiful sunny day at Imbo Beach in Tegal Rejo district, Poso, Central Sulawesi, when several locals and journalists arrived to bathe in its crystal clear waters last week. 
One of them, Rafiq Syamsuddin came up with a puzzling question: “Do you know why this beach is named ‘Imbo’?” 
“Imbo Beach was named after a man who was shot dead here. The slain man was her uncle,” Rafiq went on, pointing to Heidi, a Christian from Tentena, south of Poso city. “And the killer was him,” Rafiq said, referring to Andi Ipong, a former Muslim combatant who was also among the group enjoying the beach.
Imbo was the nickname of Tommy Sanjaya, a Christian public minivan driver who died in a drive-by shooting by several people on motorcycles, including Ipong, in 2004.
FULL ARTICLE (The Jakarta Post)
Photo: Catriona Ward/Flickr

Poso struggles for religious peace | The Jakarta Post

By Bagus BT Saragih and Ruslan Sangadji

It was a beautiful sunny day at Imbo Beach in Tegal Rejo district, Poso, Central Sulawesi, when several locals and journalists arrived to bathe in its crystal clear waters last week. 

One of them, Rafiq Syamsuddin came up with a puzzling question: “Do you know why this beach is named ‘Imbo’?” 

“Imbo Beach was named after a man who was shot dead here. The slain man was her uncle,” Rafiq went on, pointing to Heidi, a Christian from Tentena, south of Poso city. “And the killer was him,” Rafiq said, referring to Andi Ipong, a former Muslim combatant who was also among the group enjoying the beach.

Imbo was the nickname of Tommy Sanjaya, a Christian public minivan driver who died in a drive-by shooting by several people on motorcycles, including Ipong, in 2004.

FULL ARTICLE (The Jakarta Post)

Photo: Catriona Ward/Flickr

1 Nov
Al-Qaeda link to embassy bomb plots in Indonesia | The Sydney Morning Herald 
By Michael Bachelard
THE men arrested in Indonesia on the weekend planning to bomb the US embassy in Jakarta and a building across the road from the Australian embassy are likely to be tied to terror group al-Qaeda in Indonesia and were unusually sophisticated in their knowledge of explosives.
International Crisis Group expert Jim Della-Giacoma told Fairfax yesterday that the 11 men arrested by Indonesian police on Friday and Saturday had been found with the explosive nitroglycerin.
He said the men were former members of Salafi group HASMI — whose leaders have since denied any link to terrorism.
FULL ARTICLE (The Sydney Morning Herald)
Photo: Deucrox99/Wikimedia Commons 

Al-Qaeda link to embassy bomb plots in Indonesia | The Sydney Morning Herald 

By Michael Bachelard

THE men arrested in Indonesia on the weekend planning to bomb the US embassy in Jakarta and a building across the road from the Australian embassy are likely to be tied to terror group al-Qaeda in Indonesia and were unusually sophisticated in their knowledge of explosives.

International Crisis Group expert Jim Della-Giacoma told Fairfax yesterday that the 11 men arrested by Indonesian police on Friday and Saturday had been found with the explosive nitroglycerin.

He said the men were former members of Salafi group HASMI — whose leaders have since denied any link to terrorism.

FULL ARTICLE (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Photo: Deucrox99/Wikimedia Commons 

31 Oct
Indonesia bomb plot highlights rise of intolerance: analysts | AFP via The Daily Star Lebanon
By Sam Reev
JAKARTA: The discovery of a bomb plot against the US embassy in Indonesia indicates that the government’s reluctance to tackle a rising tide of intolerance is emboldening Islamist groups, analysts said Monday.
Indonesia has been applauded for a terrorism crackdown launched a decade ago after bombings in Bali that killed 202 people, and there have been no successful attacks against Western targets since suicide blasts on Jakarta hotels in 2009.
However, anti-terror police at the weekend arrested 11 members of an Islamic group allegedly targeting the US embassy, a consulate in East Java, and a Jakarta building that houses the offices of US mining giant Freeport-McMoran.
FULL ARTICLE (The Daily Star Lebanon)
Photo: nSeika/Flickr

Indonesia bomb plot highlights rise of intolerance: analysts | AFP via The Daily Star Lebanon

By Sam Reev

JAKARTA: The discovery of a bomb plot against the US embassy in Indonesia indicates that the government’s reluctance to tackle a rising tide of intolerance is emboldening Islamist groups, analysts said Monday.

Indonesia has been applauded for a terrorism crackdown launched a decade ago after bombings in Bali that killed 202 people, and there have been no successful attacks against Western targets since suicide blasts on Jakarta hotels in 2009.

However, anti-terror police at the weekend arrested 11 members of an Islamic group allegedly targeting the US embassy, a consulate in East Java, and a Jakarta building that houses the offices of US mining giant Freeport-McMoran.

FULL ARTICLE (The Daily Star Lebanon)

Photo: nSeika/Flickr

13 Oct
A convenient recruiting pool | The Jakarta Post
Hilman Djaja Kusumah was a drug dealer. The detainee, 36, who was serving a seven-year term in Kerobokan prison, Bali for possession of marijuana in 2003, became a convert to a holy cause.
He was tasked to clean the prison mosque and open the cells for inmates ahead of Friday prayers. Eventually he looked up to the bombers who were detained there — Amrozi, his brother Mukhlas, and his friend Imam Samudra, who were all later executed.
FULL ARTICLE (The Jakarta Post)
Photo: Jeroen Mirck/Flickr

A convenient recruiting pool | The Jakarta Post

Hilman Djaja Kusumah was a drug dealer. The detainee, 36, who was serving a seven-year term in Kerobokan prison, Bali for possession of marijuana in 2003, became a convert to a holy cause.

He was tasked to clean the prison mosque and open the cells for inmates ahead of Friday prayers. Eventually he looked up to the bombers who were detained there — Amrozi, his brother Mukhlas, and his friend Imam Samudra, who were all later executed.

FULL ARTICLE (The Jakarta Post)

Photo: Jeroen Mirck/Flickr

25 Sep
Indonesia Arrests 10 Suspected Militants | The Wall Street Journal 
By James Hookway 
JAKARTA—An Indonesian antiterrorist squad arrested 10 suspected Islamist militants and seized a stash of improvised bombs, police said Sunday, as worries grow over home-grown militants’ plans to strike local security forces and government officials.
The detentions underscore the way Indonesian militants have veered away from targeting Western tourists and embassies in recent years. Security analysts say they instead are now plotting lower-profile attacks on the country’s security forces and politicians, whom they accuse of preventing the introduction of Islamic Sharia law in the world’s most-populated Muslim-majority nation.
FULL ARTICLE (The Wall Street Journal)
Photo: Luther Bailey/Flickr 

Indonesia Arrests 10 Suspected Militants | The Wall Street Journal 

By James Hookway 

JAKARTA—An Indonesian antiterrorist squad arrested 10 suspected Islamist militants and seized a stash of improvised bombs, police said Sunday, as worries grow over home-grown militants’ plans to strike local security forces and government officials.

The detentions underscore the way Indonesian militants have veered away from targeting Western tourists and embassies in recent years. Security analysts say they instead are now plotting lower-profile attacks on the country’s security forces and politicians, whom they accuse of preventing the introduction of Islamic Sharia law in the world’s most-populated Muslim-majority nation.

FULL ARTICLE (The Wall Street Journal)

Photo: Luther Bailey/Flickr 

10 Sep
Blast rocks Jakarta terrorist workshop | Australian Broadcasting Corporation
By George Roberts
An explosion at what police have dubbed a terrorist workshop has injured three people near the Indonesian capital Jakarta.
Indonesian police have arrested five people in connection with the explosion, and it is understood the three injured are among the suspects.
FULL ARTICLE (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Photo: Men convicted of the 2002 Bali Bombings
Credit: publik16/Flickr

Blast rocks Jakarta terrorist workshop | Australian Broadcasting Corporation

By George Roberts

An explosion at what police have dubbed a terrorist workshop has injured three people near the Indonesian capital Jakarta.

Indonesian police have arrested five people in connection with the explosion, and it is understood the three injured are among the suspects.

FULL ARTICLE (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Photo: Men convicted of the 2002 Bali Bombings

Credit: publik16/Flickr

5 Sep
ICG Report Focuses on Conflicts in Regions and Controversial Court Rulings | Tempo Interactive
Jakarta: In its latest report titled Indonesia: Defying the State, the International Crisis Group has suggested that Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono needs to act more firmly against institutions and officials that defy national court rulings or his inaction risks prolonging local conflicts. The report details how an impact of the country’s decentralisation drive has been the emergence of regional politicians willing to defy the courts for short-term political gain. Jakarta’s response has been to dither and hope the problem will go away, encouraging more insubordination.
FULL ARTICLE (Tempo Interactive)
Photo: Sebastian Derungs/Wikimedia Commons

ICG Report Focuses on Conflicts in Regions and Controversial Court Rulings | Tempo Interactive

Jakarta: In its latest report titled Indonesia: Defying the State, the International Crisis Group has suggested that Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono needs to act more firmly against institutions and officials that defy national court rulings or his inaction risks prolonging local conflicts. The report details how an impact of the country’s decentralisation drive has been the emergence of regional politicians willing to defy the courts for short-term political gain. Jakarta’s response has been to dither and hope the problem will go away, encouraging more insubordination.

FULL ARTICLE (Tempo Interactive)

Photo: Sebastian Derungs/Wikimedia Commons

30 Aug
Indonesia: Defying the State | International Crisis Group
Jakarta/Brussels  |   30 Aug 2012
Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono needs to act more firmly against institutions and officials that defy national court rulings or his inaction risks prolonging local conflicts.
Indonesia: Defying the State, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group, details how one impact of the country’s decentralisation drive has been the emergence of regional politicians willing to defy the courts for short-term political gain. Jakarta’s response has been to dither and hope the problem will go away, encouraging more insubordination.
“Allowing local officials to defy courts sends the message that the power of the majority in a region can take precedence over institutions of justice in a way that emboldens mobs and threatens minorities”, says Achmad Sukarsono, Crisis Group’s South East Asia Analyst. “It hurts the prospects of local conflict resolution and ultimately undermines Indonesia’s democracy”.
The briefing examines three cases of local defiance. In West Kotawaringin, Central Kalimantan, councillors have been defying a Constitutional Court ruling that disqualified the winner of the district’s election on grounds of vote-buying and gave the defeated incumbent a second term. The district chief currently cannot govern properly and opponents burned down his official residence. In Bogor and Bekasi in West Java, local executives, pandering to conservative Muslims, have denied permits for church construction although courts had overruled their objections. Tensions flare whenever Christians hold services at the disputed sites.
In each case, the central government failed to enforce compliance with court rulings and allowed resistance to escalate, sometimes violently. When tensions erupted to the point of attracting media attention, Jakarta sought negotiation and compromise rather than upholding constitutional principles and judicial authority. But when these efforts failed, the authority of the president and the courts was weakened.
Jakarta officials argue that relations with regions have changed. The devolution of powers to districts and cities since 1999 is a response to the more than 30 years of centralised rule of the late President Soeharto. The advent of direct local elections in 2005 made local officials even more independent of the central government.
In the short term, the central government should treat these cases as obstruction of justice and act accordingly, using a range of legal measures that are available to the president. In the longer term, it should develop the concept of contempt of court to strengthen the judicial branch of government.
“To promote a forceful role for Jakarta on these matters is not to advocate micro-management of the regions or recentralisation, but rather to strengthen democracy and ensure that local conflicts are not allowed to fester”, says Jim Della-Giacoma, Crisis Group’s South East Asia Project Director.
FULL REPORT 

Indonesia: Defying the State | International Crisis Group

Jakarta/Brussels  |   30 Aug 2012

Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono needs to act more firmly against institutions and officials that defy national court rulings or his inaction risks prolonging local conflicts.

Indonesia: Defying the State, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group, details how one impact of the country’s decentralisation drive has been the emergence of regional politicians willing to defy the courts for short-term political gain. Jakarta’s response has been to dither and hope the problem will go away, encouraging more insubordination.

“Allowing local officials to defy courts sends the message that the power of the majority in a region can take precedence over institutions of justice in a way that emboldens mobs and threatens minorities”, says Achmad Sukarsono, Crisis Group’s South East Asia Analyst. “It hurts the prospects of local conflict resolution and ultimately undermines Indonesia’s democracy”.

The briefing examines three cases of local defiance. In West Kotawaringin, Central Kalimantan, councillors have been defying a Constitutional Court ruling that disqualified the winner of the district’s election on grounds of vote-buying and gave the defeated incumbent a second term. The district chief currently cannot govern properly and opponents burned down his official residence. In Bogor and Bekasi in West Java, local executives, pandering to conservative Muslims, have denied permits for church construction although courts had overruled their objections. Tensions flare whenever Christians hold services at the disputed sites.

In each case, the central government failed to enforce compliance with court rulings and allowed resistance to escalate, sometimes violently. When tensions erupted to the point of attracting media attention, Jakarta sought negotiation and compromise rather than upholding constitutional principles and judicial authority. But when these efforts failed, the authority of the president and the courts was weakened.

Jakarta officials argue that relations with regions have changed. The devolution of powers to districts and cities since 1999 is a response to the more than 30 years of centralised rule of the late President Soeharto. The advent of direct local elections in 2005 made local officials even more independent of the central government.

In the short term, the central government should treat these cases as obstruction of justice and act accordingly, using a range of legal measures that are available to the president. In the longer term, it should develop the concept of contempt of court to strengthen the judicial branch of government.

“To promote a forceful role for Jakarta on these matters is not to advocate micro-management of the regions or recentralisation, but rather to strengthen democracy and ensure that local conflicts are not allowed to fester”, says Jim Della-Giacoma, Crisis Group’s South East Asia Project Director.

FULL REPORT 

9 Aug

"The security apparatus is not the only problem, nor are police and soldiers always the perpetrators of violence; many have been victims as well. But they have come to symbolise everything that has gone wrong with Jakarta’s handling of the Papuan conflict."

-Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua by Crisis Group
Photo: zieak/Flickr

"The security apparatus is not the only problem, nor are police and soldiers always the perpetrators of violence; many have been victims as well. But they have come to symbolise everything that has gone wrong with Jakarta’s handling of the Papuan conflict."

-Indonesia: Dynamics of Violence in Papua by Crisis Group

Photo: zieak/Flickr