Showing posts tagged as "ICC"

Showing posts tagged ICC

12 Nov
"Indeed, thanks to some canny framing of the issue, the ICC indictment proved to be what Bryan Kahumbura, a Horn of Africa Analyst at the International Crisis Group (ICG), has termed a ‘fortunate misfortune.’"

ThinkAfrica Press

11 Nov
Entrevue avec l’honorable Louise Arbour | Franco Nuovo
Présidente de International Crisis Group Louise Arbour est interviewée sur la programme de radio Dessine-moi un dimanche.
Ecouter tout l’interview (Radio Cananda)
Photo: Coalition for the ICC/Flickr

Entrevue avec l’honorable Louise Arbour | Franco Nuovo

Présidente de International Crisis Group Louise Arbour est interviewée sur la programme de radio Dessine-moi un dimanche.

Ecouter tout l’interview (Radio Cananda)

Photo: Coalition for the ICC/Flickr

26 Oct

Doctrines Derailed?: Internationalism’s Uncertain Future

Global Briefing 2013 opening speech from the International Crisis Group’s President & CEO Louise Arbour. In her opening remarks, Arbour looks at the pursuit of international criminal justice; the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine; peacekeeping missions; and the international promotion of the Rule of Law. The shortcomings of these existing frameworks for conflict prevention are highlighted as she argues that it is only by acknowledging the inadequacies of our approaches that we have any chance of improving them. We are encouraged to fine-tune the tools of conflict management and use them more wisely to advance peace and security.

19 Jul
Ivory Coast ex-leader’s party in disarray | AP
By Robbie Corey-Boulet 
Each morning, briefcase in hand, Laurent Boblet takes two taxis and two minibuses to the headquarters of the Ivorian Popular Front, the party of Ivory Coast’s former strongman who is now facing international charges of crimes against humanity.
FULL ARTICLE (AP)
Photo: VOA-M Motta/Flickr

Ivory Coast ex-leader’s party in disarray | AP

By Robbie Corey-Boulet 

Each morning, briefcase in hand, Laurent Boblet takes two taxis and two minibuses to the headquarters of the Ivorian Popular Front, the party of Ivory Coast’s former strongman who is now facing international charges of crimes against humanity.

FULL ARTICLE (AP)

Photo: VOA-M Motta/Flickr

13 Jul

African states pledge to eradicate DRC rebels | Al Jazeera

"The Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and neighbouring states have called for the creation of an international military force to eliminate armed rebels in the DRC’s volatile east."

FULL ARTICLE

28 Jun
Congo unrest challenges UN | Deutsche Welle
By Hilke Fischer
Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo teeters on the brink of chaos as civilians flee the fighting. Analysts warn only a radically new UN strategy can help.
The Democratic Republic of Congo seethes with unrest. Numerous rebel groups are fighting in the east of the country over territory, natural resources and political influence.
Particularly badly hit is the eastern province of North Kivu. Moustapha Mwiti coordinates civil society groups in the DRC. He says local residents there are in the middle of war zone. “Many are fleeing, others are being killed and villages are being torched,” he says.
FULL ARTICLE (Deutsche Welle)
Photo: picture-alliance/dpa

Congo unrest challenges UN | Deutsche Welle

By Hilke Fischer

Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo teeters on the brink of chaos as civilians flee the fighting. Analysts warn only a radically new UN strategy can help.

The Democratic Republic of Congo seethes with unrest. Numerous rebel groups are fighting in the east of the country over territory, natural resources and political influence.

Particularly badly hit is the eastern province of North Kivu. Moustapha Mwiti coordinates civil society groups in the DRC. He says local residents there are in the middle of war zone. “Many are fleeing, others are being killed and villages are being torched,” he says.

FULL ARTICLE (Deutsche Welle)

Photo: picture-alliance/dpa

22 Jun
ABC

Family waits to hear detained lawyer's fate

Family waits to hear detained lawyers’ fate | Australian Broadcasting Corporation

ELEANOR HALL: The family of an Australian lawyer who is being detained in Libya are facing an anxious wait to learn of her fate. 

Melinda Taylor was detained on Thursday along with three of her colleagues from the International Criminal Court.

They’d travelled to the city of Zintan in north-western Libya to speak to Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, about providing a defence for him against charges of crimes against humanity. 

No one from the court, Mr Taylor’s family or the Australian Government has so far been unable to speak to her. 

Ashley Hall has our report.

ASHLEY HALL: From the time she began studying law at the University of Queensland, it was plain that Melinda Taylor was destined for big things.

ANTHONY CASSIMATIS: She was an incredibly hard working student who had a great commitment to international criminal justice.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Photo:كة برق | B.R.Q

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11 Jun
Defiant Libyan militia hold ICC team for a third day | The National
By: Alice Fordham
CAIRO // A mountain militia in western Libya defied diplomats, the International Criminal Court and their own president yesterday by detaining an ICC legal delegation for a third day.
The four ICC staff are accused of trying to pass forbidden material to Saif Al Islam, imprisoned son of the former Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi, while visiting him in Zintan. The military council in Zintan said they tried to give him a camera and a letter from Mohamad Ismail, a senior member of the Qaddafi regime.
FULL ARTICLE (The National)
Photo: B.R.Q./Flickr

Defiant Libyan militia hold ICC team for a third day | The National

By: Alice Fordham

CAIRO // A mountain militia in western Libya defied diplomats, the International Criminal Court and their own president yesterday by detaining an ICC legal delegation for a third day.

The four ICC staff are accused of trying to pass forbidden material to Saif Al Islam, imprisoned son of the former Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi, while visiting him in Zintan. The military council in Zintan said they tried to give him a camera and a letter from Mohamad Ismail, a senior member of the Qaddafi regime.

FULL ARTICLE (The National)

Photo: B.R.Q./Flickr

Should Saif al-Islam be tried in Libya? | Al Jazeera

On Friday, the armed brigade that has been holding Saif al-Islam, Muammar Gaddafi’s son, captured four ICC staff members who went to meet him, accusing them of trying to pass documents to him.

The incident highlights the problems posed by the existence of powerful local militias in Libya and calls into question the authority of the central government under the National Transitional Council (NTC) in the run-up to the general elections.

The ICC and Libyan authorities have been unable to agree on where al-Islam should be tried.

The ICC wants to try him for crimes against humanity. But Libya says he should be tried in his own country and has refused to hand him over to the ICC.

FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera)

25 May
ICC Turns Attention to Mali | Institute for War and Peace Reporting
By IWPR Contributor 

The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, ICC, has turned his attention to Mali, where he will look into a spate of recent atrocities, using special powers that allow him to launch an investigation on his own initiative. 
Analysts have largely welcomed Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo’s move to investigate the situation in Mali, and believe it could help deter further crimes in the country. But the prosecutor’s power to initiate an investigation without a referral from the United Nations Security Council or from an ICC member state known as “proprio motu”, Latin for “on his own impulse”, is under scrutiny since his first full-scale probe, in Kenya, has met with resistance and limited cooperation from that country’s government.
In a statement released on April 24, the ICC’s Office of the Prosecutor, OTP, announced that it was looking into the possibility that war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide had been taking place in Mali.
The prosecutor’s concerns stem from the violence that swept the country at the beginning of the year, as a Tuareg rebels launched an uprising in the north, leading to clashes also involving Arab and Islamist militias. A military coup in March left Mali in chaos, with the north of the country outside effective government control.
If the ICC’s prosecutor is to move to a full investigation in Mali, there may be valuable lessons to be learnt from the OTP’s experience in Kenya.
In that case, the prosecutor chose to invoke his proprio motu powers rather than wait for a referral from the Kenyan state following the violence that erupted after a disputed presidential election in late 2007.
He has only succeeded in getting the charges against four of the original six indictees upheld. As soon as the six suspects charged, a debate began within the country over whether Kenya should leave the ICC. It ultimately chose to remain a signatory to the court’s founding treaty, the Rome Statute, but its stance has soured the government’s relationship with the court.
FULL ARTICLE (IWPR)
Photo: شبكة برق | B.R.Q/Flickr

ICC Turns Attention to Mali | Institute for War and Peace Reporting

By IWPR Contributor 

The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, ICC, has turned his attention to Mali, where he will look into a spate of recent atrocities, using special powers that allow him to launch an investigation on his own initiative. 

Analysts have largely welcomed Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo’s move to investigate the situation in Mali, and believe it could help deter further crimes in the country. But the prosecutor’s power to initiate an investigation without a referral from the United Nations Security Council or from an ICC member state known as “proprio motu”, Latin for “on his own impulse”, is under scrutiny since his first full-scale probe, in Kenya, has met with resistance and limited cooperation from that country’s government.

In a statement released on April 24, the ICC’s Office of the Prosecutor, OTP, announced that it was looking into the possibility that war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide had been taking place in Mali.

The prosecutor’s concerns stem from the violence that swept the country at the beginning of the year, as a Tuareg rebels launched an uprising in the north, leading to clashes also involving Arab and Islamist militias. A military coup in March left Mali in chaos, with the north of the country outside effective government control.

If the ICC’s prosecutor is to move to a full investigation in Mali, there may be valuable lessons to be learnt from the OTP’s experience in Kenya.

In that case, the prosecutor chose to invoke his proprio motu powers rather than wait for a referral from the Kenyan state following the violence that erupted after a disputed presidential election in late 2007.

He has only succeeded in getting the charges against four of the original six indictees upheld. As soon as the six suspects charged, a debate began within the country over whether Kenya should leave the ICC. It ultimately chose to remain a signatory to the court’s founding treaty, the Rome Statute, but its stance has soured the government’s relationship with the court.

FULL ARTICLE (IWPR)

Photo: شبكة برق | B.R.Q/Flickr