Showing posts tagged as "Egypt"

Showing posts tagged Egypt

26 Mar
'Contagion of polarisation' dominates post-Arab Spring scene | Nadeen Shaker
Pundits studying the Middle East often cite Islamism as the most scathing malaise currently afflicting the region. To Issandr El-Amrani, owner of The Arabist blog and project director of International Crisis Group’s North African Project, however, differences between ruling groups, aside from their ideological beliefs, drive polarisation in post-revolutionary Arab countries.
In a lecture at the American University in Cairo on Wednesday, entitled “Egypt, Libya, Tunisia: From the Contagion of Revolution to the Contagion of Polarisation,” El-Amrani developed the metaphor of “contagion” — adapting the domino effect scenario, in which Arab uprisings contagiously spread — to one where “polarisation”, not revolution, was the final outcome.
FULL ARTICLE (Ahram Online)
Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Wikimedia Commons

'Contagion of polarisation' dominates post-Arab Spring scene | Nadeen Shaker

Pundits studying the Middle East often cite Islamism as the most scathing malaise currently afflicting the region. To Issandr El-Amrani, owner of The Arabist blog and project director of International Crisis Group’s North African Project, however, differences between ruling groups, aside from their ideological beliefs, drive polarisation in post-revolutionary Arab countries.

In a lecture at the American University in Cairo on Wednesday, entitled “Egypt, Libya, Tunisia: From the Contagion of Revolution to the Contagion of Polarisation,” El-Amrani developed the metaphor of “contagion” — adapting the domino effect scenario, in which Arab uprisings contagiously spread — to one where “polarisation”, not revolution, was the final outcome.

FULL ARTICLE (Ahram Online)

Photo: Jonathan Rashad/Wikimedia Commons

20 Mar
Militancy on rise in Egypt | Sarah Lynch
Egyptian militants have intensified violence ahead of a presidential election to pick a replacement for jailed president Mohamed Morsi, whose Muslim Brotherhood party has called the ouster “a murderous military coup d’etat.”
Militants who seek an Egypt under strict Islamic law are saying the ouster of Morsi and arrests of his leading party members prove that only violence will achieve their aim, analysts said.
"The attacks are increasing in frequency, in intensity and in geographic spread," said Issandr El Amrani, North Africa director for the International Crisis Group, in Cairo.
"We are looking at a spreading armed campaign against the government."
FULL ARTICLE (USA Today)
Photo: Zeinab Mohamed/flickr

Militancy on rise in Egypt | Sarah Lynch

Egyptian militants have intensified violence ahead of a presidential election to pick a replacement for jailed president Mohamed Morsi, whose Muslim Brotherhood party has called the ouster “a murderous military coup d’etat.”

Militants who seek an Egypt under strict Islamic law are saying the ouster of Morsi and arrests of his leading party members prove that only violence will achieve their aim, analysts said.

"The attacks are increasing in frequency, in intensity and in geographic spread," said Issandr El Amrani, North Africa director for the International Crisis Group, in Cairo.

"We are looking at a spreading armed campaign against the government."

FULL ARTICLE (USA Today)

Photo: Zeinab Mohamed/flickr

5 Mar
Analysis: Reconciliation looks remote in Egypt | IRIN News
The seven months since July’s overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi in Egypt have been among the most violent and divisive in recent times, analysts say, as much of society polarizes along pro-Muslim Brotherhood (MB) and pro-army lines. 
Reconciliation seems a distant prospect and more remote now, some argue, than in the immediate aftermath of the army takeover. 
“The reconciliation opportunity, which existed after Morsi’s overthrow, has disappeared,” said Issandr el Amrani, an International Crisis Group (ICG) analyst on Egypt. “Now that the officials and media call the Brotherhood a `terrorist organization’ and hold them responsible for all the attacks, [the security forces] have to stick to this point of view.” 
FULL ARTICLE (IRIN News)
Photo: oxfamnovib/flickr

Analysis: Reconciliation looks remote in Egypt | IRIN News

The seven months since July’s overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi in Egypt have been among the most violent and divisive in recent times, analysts say, as much of society polarizes along pro-Muslim Brotherhood (MB) and pro-army lines. 

Reconciliation seems a distant prospect and more remote now, some argue, than in the immediate aftermath of the army takeover. 

“The reconciliation opportunity, which existed after Morsi’s overthrow, has disappeared,” said Issandr el Amrani, an International Crisis Group (ICG) analyst on Egypt. “Now that the officials and media call the Brotherhood a `terrorist organization’ and hold them responsible for all the attacks, [the security forces] have to stick to this point of view.” 

FULL ARTICLE (IRIN News)

Photo: oxfamnovib/flickr

26 Feb
Egypt’s Generals turn to an Old Rival in the Fight against Islamist Militancy in Sinai | Tom Stevenson
For over two years, the Islamist militant group Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis (ABM) has been launching violent attacks against the Egyptian state in North Sinai. These fighters have been responsible for killing dozens of Egyptians in coordinated bombings, carrying out a handful of assassination attempts, and earlier this month demonstrated a possible change in tactics when suicide attackers blew up a bus killing three South Korean tourists and the Egyptian driver.
Despite regular claims to have killed or captured key militants, the Egyptian government’s attempts to quell the violence from this group have so far proven ineffective. There have been over 300 reported attacks since last July, and the run of attacks shows no sign of abating.
With insecurity in the Sinai peninsula deteriorating and Cairo looking short of options, it is little wonder that it has turned to others for help in tackling the Islamist militancy. However its latest choice of partner may raise some eyebrows.
FULL ARTICLE (Think Africa Press)
Photo: Hossam el-Hamalawy/flickr

Egypt’s Generals turn to an Old Rival in the Fight against Islamist Militancy in Sinai | Tom Stevenson

For over two years, the Islamist militant group Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis (ABM) has been launching violent attacks against the Egyptian state in North Sinai. These fighters have been responsible for killing dozens of Egyptians in coordinated bombings, carrying out a handful of assassination attempts, and earlier this month demonstrated a possible change in tactics when suicide attackers blew up a bus killing three South Korean tourists and the Egyptian driver.

Despite regular claims to have killed or captured key militants, the Egyptian government’s attempts to quell the violence from this group have so far proven ineffective. There have been over 300 reported attacks since last July, and the run of attacks shows no sign of abating.

With insecurity in the Sinai peninsula deteriorating and Cairo looking short of options, it is little wonder that it has turned to others for help in tackling the Islamist militancy. However its latest choice of partner may raise some eyebrows.

FULL ARTICLE (Think Africa Press)

Photo: Hossam el-Hamalawy/flickr

24 Feb
Egyptian cabinet resigns, paving way for military chief to run for president | Abigail Hauslohner
Egyptian Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi announced Monday that his cabinet was resigning, marking yet another abrupt shift in a nation that has been wracked by insurgency and political and economic uncertainty.
“Today the cabinet took a decision to offer its resignation to the president of the republic,” Beblawi said in a statement to Egyptian state television.
He did not offer any reason for the surprise move. But the mass resignation paves the way for the country’s powerful military commander, Field Marshal Abdel Fatah al-Sissi, who is also the country’s defense minister and first deputy prime minister, to run for president.
FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)
Photo: World Economic Forum/flickr

Egyptian cabinet resigns, paving way for military chief to run for president | Abigail Hauslohner

Egyptian Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi announced Monday that his cabinet was resigning, marking yet another abrupt shift in a nation that has been wracked by insurgency and political and economic uncertainty.

“Today the cabinet took a decision to offer its resignation to the president of the republic,” Beblawi said in a statement to Egyptian state television.

He did not offer any reason for the surprise move. But the mass resignation paves the way for the country’s powerful military commander, Field Marshal Abdel Fatah al-Sissi, who is also the country’s defense minister and first deputy prime minister, to run for president.

FULL ARTICLE (Washington Post)

Photo: World Economic Forum/flickr

18 Feb
Russia Backs Egyptian Military Ruler In Attempt To Eclipse U.S. Influence | Sophia Jones
In a high-profile meeting in Moscow this week, Russian President Vladimir Putin gave his full-fledged support for Egypt’s military leader to run for president, a sign of yet another diplomatic tug of war between Russia and the United States in the region.
The nod of approval for Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi comes amid talks of a reported $2 billion Gulf-funded arms deal with Russia, as Egypt seemingly plays the United States and Russia off each other in a bid for aid. With Washington and Moscow battling for power in the Middle East, Egypt’s talks with Russia could further fuel U.S. foreign policy confusion.
FULL ARTICLE (World Post)
Photo: sierragoddess/flickr

Russia Backs Egyptian Military Ruler In Attempt To Eclipse U.S. Influence | Sophia Jones

In a high-profile meeting in Moscow this week, Russian President Vladimir Putin gave his full-fledged support for Egypt’s military leader to run for president, a sign of yet another diplomatic tug of war between Russia and the United States in the region.

The nod of approval for Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi comes amid talks of a reported $2 billion Gulf-funded arms deal with Russia, as Egypt seemingly plays the United States and Russia off each other in a bid for aid. With Washington and Moscow battling for power in the Middle East, Egypt’s talks with Russia could further fuel U.S. foreign policy confusion.

FULL ARTICLE (World Post)

Photo: sierragoddess/flickr

Suicide bomber likely behind tourist attack: Egypt police | Samer al-Atrush
Egyptian police said Monday a suicide bomber was likely behind an attack on a tour bus that killed three South Koreans and signalled a possible change in tactics by militants who have mainly targeted security forces.
The bombing on Sunday, near the Taba border crossing with Israel, was the first targeting tourists since the military overthrow of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in July sparked a militant campaign that has killed scores of police and soldiers.
A shift to ‘soft targets’ such as tourists would further damage Egypt’s foundering tourism industry as army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi is expected to announce a presidential bid which would focus on law-and-order and economic recovery.
After reviewing CCTV footage of the attack, police said they believe a suicide bomber boarded the tourist bus and detonated explosives near the door.
FULL ARTICLE (AFP)
Photo: ChrisYunker/flickr

Suicide bomber likely behind tourist attack: Egypt police | Samer al-Atrush

Egyptian police said Monday a suicide bomber was likely behind an attack on a tour bus that killed three South Koreans and signalled a possible change in tactics by militants who have mainly targeted security forces.

The bombing on Sunday, near the Taba border crossing with Israel, was the first targeting tourists since the military overthrow of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in July sparked a militant campaign that has killed scores of police and soldiers.

A shift to ‘soft targets’ such as tourists would further damage Egypt’s foundering tourism industry as army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi is expected to announce a presidential bid which would focus on law-and-order and economic recovery.

After reviewing CCTV footage of the attack, police said they believe a suicide bomber boarded the tourist bus and detonated explosives near the door.

FULL ARTICLE (AFP)

Photo: ChrisYunker/flickr

11 Feb
Egypt’s Crackdown Widens, But Insurgency Still Burns | Leila Fadel
Here are three numbers that tell the story of Egypt’s security crackdown, its political turmoil and the simmering insurgency.
16,687. It’s estimated that at least this many political detainees have been imprisoned since the military ousted the Islamist president, Mohammed Morsi, on July 3.
4,482. At least this many people have been killed in clashes since Morsi’s ouster, many at the hands of security forces.
198. That’s the number of people killed, mostly security force members, in armed attacks on the police and army between July and November 2013. Many more have died since.
These estimates by the Egyptian Center of Economic and Social Rights highlight the killings, insurgent attacks, mass arrests and point to the chronic tensions in what the government says is a war for survival against terrorists.
But analysts say oppressive practices by the military-backed government have encouraged more extreme actions by jihadists — and they predict that the attacks on the state will likely grow.
FULL ARTICLE (NPR)
Photo: Globovisión/flickr

Egypt’s Crackdown Widens, But Insurgency Still Burns | Leila Fadel

Here are three numbers that tell the story of Egypt’s security crackdown, its political turmoil and the simmering insurgency.

16,687. It’s estimated that at least this many political detainees have been imprisoned since the military ousted the Islamist president, Mohammed Morsi, on July 3.

4,482. At least this many people have been killed in clashes since Morsi’s ouster, many at the hands of security forces.

198. That’s the number of people killed, mostly security force members, in armed attacks on the police and army between July and November 2013. Many more have died since.

These estimates by the Egyptian Center of Economic and Social Rights highlight the killings, insurgent attacks, mass arrests and point to the chronic tensions in what the government says is a war for survival against terrorists.

But analysts say oppressive practices by the military-backed government have encouraged more extreme actions by jihadists — and they predict that the attacks on the state will likely grow.

FULL ARTICLE (NPR)

Photo: Globovisión/flickr

3 Feb
Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

Catch up on the world’s conflicts in this month’s CrisisWatch map.

27 Jan
LINK

Where Does The Dream Of Democracy Stand In Egypt?

Issandr El Amrani, our North African Project Director, discusses the fragile state of Egypt with NPR.