Showing posts tagged as "Democratic Republic of Congo"

Showing posts tagged Democratic Republic of Congo

1 Apr
The Security Challenges of Pastoralism in Central Africa
Nairobi/Brussels  |   1 Apr 2014
Sensible, inclusive regulation of pastoralism that has mitigated tension in parts of the Sahel should be extended to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Central African Republic (CAR), where conflicts have worsened with the southward expansion of pastoralism.
In its latest report, Central Africa: The Security Challenges of Pastoralism, the International Crisis Group Group analyses an under-reported human security problem: violent conflicts related to the expansion of pastoralism southward from the Sahel. This dynamic is problematic because pastoral ecosystems transcend borders and transhumance creates new settlement fronts and sources of friction in Central Africa.
The report’s major findings and recommendations are:
Pastoralism generates wealth and economic interdependence but also causes tensions, usually over water or pasture. In the last few years, conflicts have intensified because of growing insecurity and small-arms proliferation; climate change and the southward shift of cattle migration; the multipli-cation of transhumance roads, especially transnational routes; expansion of cultivated areas into traditional grazing lands; and growing cattle herds
In Chad, the government should reinforce regulation of cattle migration by deploying staff from the livestock ministry to improve marking and organisation of transhumance roads and of cattle resting areas and to provide services along roads and next to cattle markets.
In CAR, even before the ongoing crisis, violent clashes between Chadian herdsmen and the local population caused thousands to flee their homes during the past years. Ahead of the migration sea-son, the regional organisation in charge of pastoralism (CEBEVIRAH) should organise a meeting with the CAR and Chad governments to establish monitoring mechanisms and reduce tensions. Af-ter CAR is stabilised, both countries need to negotiate clear regulations together with pastoralists and farmers to prevent future conflict.
In the DRC, tensions between the migrant Mbororo community – from the Peul ethnic group – and local farmers in Orientale Province could be calmed by giving Mbororo pastoralists official permission to remain, monitoring them, establishing mediation committees and developing economic interactions between them and the local population.
“Conflicts linked to pastoralist movements from Chad to CAR or into north-eastern DRC take place in deeply rural areas” says Central Africa Analyst Thibaud Lesueur. “Despite a growing death toll, they are invisible and neglected by the governments”
“Pastoralism needs to be regulated effectively in this region”, says Central Africa Project Director Thierry Vircoulon. “But regulation cannot be imposed: it must be negotiated between state and non-state actors and must foster economic interdependence between pastoralists and farmers”.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Security Challenges of Pastoralism in Central Africa

Nairobi/Brussels  |   1 Apr 2014

Sensible, inclusive regulation of pastoralism that has mitigated tension in parts of the Sahel should be extended to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Central African Republic (CAR), where conflicts have worsened with the southward expansion of pastoralism.

In its latest report, Central Africa: The Security Challenges of Pastoralism, the International Crisis Group Group analyses an under-reported human security problem: violent conflicts related to the expansion of pastoralism southward from the Sahel. This dynamic is problematic because pastoral ecosystems transcend borders and transhumance creates new settlement fronts and sources of friction in Central Africa.

The report’s major findings and recommendations are:

Pastoralism generates wealth and economic interdependence but also causes tensions, usually over water or pasture. In the last few years, conflicts have intensified because of growing insecurity and small-arms proliferation; climate change and the southward shift of cattle migration; the multipli-cation of transhumance roads, especially transnational routes; expansion of cultivated areas into traditional grazing lands; and growing cattle herds

In Chad, the government should reinforce regulation of cattle migration by deploying staff from the livestock ministry to improve marking and organisation of transhumance roads and of cattle resting areas and to provide services along roads and next to cattle markets.

In CAR, even before the ongoing crisis, violent clashes between Chadian herdsmen and the local population caused thousands to flee their homes during the past years. Ahead of the migration sea-son, the regional organisation in charge of pastoralism (CEBEVIRAH) should organise a meeting with the CAR and Chad governments to establish monitoring mechanisms and reduce tensions. Af-ter CAR is stabilised, both countries need to negotiate clear regulations together with pastoralists and farmers to prevent future conflict.

In the DRC, tensions between the migrant Mbororo community – from the Peul ethnic group – and local farmers in Orientale Province could be calmed by giving Mbororo pastoralists official permission to remain, monitoring them, establishing mediation committees and developing economic interactions between them and the local population.

“Conflicts linked to pastoralist movements from Chad to CAR or into north-eastern DRC take place in deeply rural areas” says Central Africa Analyst Thibaud Lesueur. “Despite a growing death toll, they are invisible and neglected by the governments”

“Pastoralism needs to be regulated effectively in this region”, says Central Africa Project Director Thierry Vircoulon. “But regulation cannot be imposed: it must be negotiated between state and non-state actors and must foster economic interdependence between pastoralists and farmers”.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

5 Sep
Olivier Rogez

Thierry Vircoulon, directeur pour l'Afrique centrale de l'International Crisis Group

Thierry Vircoulon, directeur pour l’Afrique centrale de l’International Crisis Group | Olivier Rogez

C’est le sommet de la dernière chance. Après les récents combats dans le Nord Kivu entre le M23 d’un côté, les forces congolaises et l’ONU de l’autre, les chefs d’Etat de la région des Grands Lacs se réunissent ce jeudi à Kampala.

Kinshasa veut obtenir le désarmement du M23. Un objectif qui n’est pas celui du Rwanda. Va-ton vers un compromis ou un clash ?

Ecouter à l’entretien (RFI) 

Photo: United Nations Photo/Flickr

19 plays
Album Art
28 Aug
UN’s peacekeeping offensive in DRC | Inside Story
Renewed fighting has broken out around Goma, the capital of North Kivu province, close to the Democratic Republic of Congo’s border with Rwanda.
And UN peacekeepers are taking a more combative role as fighting escalates in the DR Congo.
Its elite intervention brigade, which has been given a robust mandate to take on armed groups, has been drawn into the fight, changing the dynamic of the conflict in DRC’s troubled east and raising questions about the UN’s aggressive new military mandate.
FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera English) 
Photo: United Nations Photo/Flickr

UN’s peacekeeping offensive in DRC | Inside Story

Renewed fighting has broken out around Goma, the capital of North Kivu province, close to the Democratic Republic of Congo’s border with Rwanda.

And UN peacekeepers are taking a more combative role as fighting escalates in the DR Congo.

Its elite intervention brigade, which has been given a robust mandate to take on armed groups, has been drawn into the fight, changing the dynamic of the conflict in DRC’s troubled east and raising questions about the UN’s aggressive new military mandate.

FULL ARTICLE (Al Jazeera English) 

Photo: United Nations Photo/Flickr

13 Aug
Can the DRC army stop abusing human rights? | IRIN
Stamping out human rights abuses by the army in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) entails more than classroom training sessions, according to analysts, who recommend a wide range of ambitious reforms. 
These include better discipline, an efficient payroll system, the development of security policies, the prosecution of offenders, and better education and training to reform and professionalize the army, also known as FARDC. 
FULL ARTICLE (IRIN)
Photo: US Army Africa/Flickr

Can the DRC army stop abusing human rights? | IRIN

Stamping out human rights abuses by the army in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) entails more than classroom training sessions, according to analysts, who recommend a wide range of ambitious reforms. 

These include better discipline, an efficient payroll system, the development of security policies, the prosecution of offenders, and better education and training to reform and professionalize the army, also known as FARDC. 

FULL ARTICLE (IRIN)

Photo: US Army Africa/Flickr

12 Jul
DRC-based Ugandan rebel group “recruiting, training” | IRIN
The Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), a Ugandan rebel movement based in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), is recruiting, training and reorganizing to carry out fresh attacks on Uganda, officials say. 
FULL STORY (IRIN)
Photo: Julien Harneis/Flickr

DRC-based Ugandan rebel group “recruiting, training” | IRIN

The Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), a Ugandan rebel movement based in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), is recruiting, training and reorganizing to carry out fresh attacks on Uganda, officials say. 

FULL STORY (IRIN)

Photo: Julien Harneis/Flickr

3 Jan
from 10 Conflicts to Watch in 2013 | Foreign Policy
by Louise Arbour
Democratic Republic of the Congo
The April 2012 mutiny in the east by M23 rebels, former rebels turned military turned rebels again, created a distinct feeling of déja vu. Once again, after so many years of conflict, regional and international actors are left scrambling to contain an insurgent rebel group, with a range of ostensibly domestic demands but clearly profiting from external backing, and prevent another regional war in the DRC. The consequences of the latest round of violence have been tragic for civilians, with reports emerging of wide-scale human rights abuses, extrajudicial executions targeting civil society, and massive displacement of local populations.
Mediation efforts by the regional International Conference of the Great Lakes Region have seen the withdrawal of M23 from the eastern city of Goma and the initiation of peace talks, but the risk of repeated rebellion and widespread violence remain. Previous attempts at post-conflict reconstruction in the DRC have met with little success. Without adequate pressure on both the DRC government and Rwanda-backed rebels to enact crucial governance reforms and open political dialogue, the sad history of civil conflict will likely continue to repeat itself in the DRC in 2013.
Congo’s dismal state should also force the international community to take a hard look at its own behavior. Ten years into a massive commitment to shore up stability in the DRC, bring legitimacy to the government in Kinshasa, and protect civilians in the east, the situation is going from bad to worse. The government of President Joseph Kabila lacks national buy-in; the citizens of the eastern Kivu provinces — despite the presence of the largest-ever U.N. peacekeeping operation — remain woefully unprotected; and the country’s integrity remains prey to the whims of predatory neighbors.
FULL ARTICLE (Foreign Policy)
Photo: EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection/Flickr

from 10 Conflicts to Watch in 2013 | Foreign Policy

by Louise Arbour

Democratic Republic of the Congo

The April 2012 mutiny in the east by M23 rebels, former rebels turned military turned rebels again, created a distinct feeling of déja vu. Once again, after so many years of conflict, regional and international actors are left scrambling to contain an insurgent rebel group, with a range of ostensibly domestic demands but clearly profiting from external backing, and prevent another regional war in the DRC. The consequences of the latest round of violence have been tragic for civilians, with reports emerging of wide-scale human rights abuses, extrajudicial executions targeting civil society, and massive displacement of local populations.

Mediation efforts by the regional International Conference of the Great Lakes Region have seen the withdrawal of M23 from the eastern city of Goma and the initiation of peace talks, but the risk of repeated rebellion and widespread violence remain. Previous attempts at post-conflict reconstruction in the DRC have met with little success. Without adequate pressure on both the DRC government and Rwanda-backed rebels to enact crucial governance reforms and open political dialogue, the sad history of civil conflict will likely continue to repeat itself in the DRC in 2013.

Congo’s dismal state should also force the international community to take a hard look at its own behavior. Ten years into a massive commitment to shore up stability in the DRC, bring legitimacy to the government in Kinshasa, and protect civilians in the east, the situation is going from bad to worse. The government of President Joseph Kabila lacks national buy-in; the citizens of the eastern Kivu provinces — despite the presence of the largest-ever U.N. peacekeeping operation — remain woefully unprotected; and the country’s integrity remains prey to the whims of predatory neighbors.

FULL ARTICLE (Foreign Policy)

Photo: EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection/Flickr

18 Oct
New U.N. Charges Linking Rwanda to DRC Rebel Group Heat Up Regional Tensions | World Politics Review 
By Brian Dabbs 
KAMPALA, Uganda — Following months of heated exchanges between international observers and Rwandan officials, a United Nations investigative body leveled its most detailed and controversial accusations over alleged Rwandan support for the Congolese M23 rebels in a 44-page report leaked late Tuesday. 
The document claims that Rwandan Defense Minister Gen. James Kabarebe exercises direct command over the rebel group. Formerly integrated into the Congolese army, M23 launched a mutiny in April, carving a significant swathe of territory out of the volatile, crisis-prone eastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo ever since.
FULL ARTICLE (World Politics Review)
Photo: Al Jazeera English/Flickr

New U.N. Charges Linking Rwanda to DRC Rebel Group Heat Up Regional Tensions | World Politics Review 

By Brian Dabbs 

KAMPALA, Uganda — Following months of heated exchanges between international observers and Rwandan officials, a United Nations investigative body leveled its most detailed and controversial accusations over alleged Rwandan support for the Congolese M23 rebels in a 44-page report leaked late Tuesday. 

The document claims that Rwandan Defense Minister Gen. James Kabarebe exercises direct command over the rebel group. Formerly integrated into the Congolese army, M23 launched a mutiny in April, carving a significant swathe of territory out of the volatile, crisis-prone eastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo ever since.

FULL ARTICLE (World Politics Review)

Photo: Al Jazeera English/Flickr

Congo demands sanctions on Rwanda, Uganda over rebels | Reuters 
By Jonny Hogg
(Reuters) - Democratic Republic of Congo on Wednesday demanded targeted sanctions against Rwandan and Ugandan officials accused by a U.N. experts panel of backing a six-month-old insurgency in its volatile eastern borderlands.
The U.N. Security Council’s Group of Experts said in a confidential report seen by Reuters that both Rwanda and Uganda were supporting the M23 rebels, who are expanding their control of parts of Congo’s mineral-rich North Kivu province, forcing hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: United Nations/Flickr 

Congo demands sanctions on Rwanda, Uganda over rebels | Reuters 

By Jonny Hogg

(Reuters) - Democratic Republic of Congo on Wednesday demanded targeted sanctions against Rwandan and Ugandan officials accused by a U.N. experts panel of backing a six-month-old insurgency in its volatile eastern borderlands.

The U.N. Security Council’s Group of Experts said in a confidential report seen by Reuters that both Rwanda and Uganda were supporting the M23 rebels, who are expanding their control of parts of Congo’s mineral-rich North Kivu province, forcing hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: United Nations/Flickr 

30 Aug
Intervention in Eastern Congo a Rising Priority for Activists | AlertNet
Carey L. Biron
As the situation in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) continues to deteriorate in the wake of an armed rebellion that began in April, some activists have strengthened calls for foreign military intervention.
FULL ARTICLE (AlertNet)
Photo: davehighbury 

Intervention in Eastern Congo a Rising Priority for Activists | AlertNet

Carey L. Biron

As the situation in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) continues to deteriorate in the wake of an armed rebellion that began in April, some activists have strengthened calls for foreign military intervention.

FULL ARTICLE (AlertNet)

Photo: davehighbury 

7 Aug
African Leaders Discuss Sending Troops Into DRC  |  Voice of America
By Hilary Heuler
KAMPALA — Leaders of Africa’s Great Lakes region are meeting in the Ugandan capital to discuss sending an international force into the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.
The leaders of the eleven countries that make up the African Great Lakes region gathered in Kampala, Uganda today to address the latest crisis in eastern Congo, where the government has been battling rebel groups for years.
FULL ARTICLE (VOA)
Photo: US Army Africa/Flickr

African Leaders Discuss Sending Troops Into DRC  |  Voice of America

By Hilary Heuler

KAMPALA — Leaders of Africa’s Great Lakes region are meeting in the Ugandan capital to discuss sending an international force into the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

The leaders of the eleven countries that make up the African Great Lakes region gathered in Kampala, Uganda today to address the latest crisis in eastern Congo, where the government has been battling rebel groups for years.

FULL ARTICLE (VOA)

Photo: US Army Africa/Flickr