Showing posts tagged as "Conflict Resoultion"

Showing posts tagged Conflict Resoultion

8 Nov
Check out Crisis Group’s Weekly Update, a summary of everything we have published over the past week.

Check out Crisis Group’s Weekly Update, a summary of everything we have published over the past week.

27 Jun
"None of this would fundamentally alter the trajectory of the conflict or truly point to its resolution. But at least it would be a start, which is far more than one can say has been achieved at this sorry stage."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Syria’s Metastasising Conflicts

"The war is metastasising in ways that draw in regional and other international actors, erase boundaries and give rise to a single, transnational arc of crisis."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Syria’s Metastasising Conflicts

"It is not a zero-sum game in which one side’s gains definitely mean the other side’s loss."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Syria’s Metastasising Conflicts

"For now, the focus should be on immediate steps to de-escalate the conflict and on mapping out in more detail an endgame that could serve as the basis for a diplomatic settlement."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Syria’s Metastasising Conflicts

2 May

We have to accept that we will live with conflict. We cannot aspire to eradicating it. Conflict comes from competition for access to resources, particularly in a world in which the institutions are not geared to an equitable distribution of resources and of wealth. So we will have conflict. The question is how to appease conflict, resolve it, without recourse to deadly, violent interaction.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Photo: svenwerk/Flickr

We have to accept that we will live with conflict. We cannot aspire to eradicating it. Conflict comes from competition for access to resources, particularly in a world in which the institutions are not geared to an equitable distribution of resources and of wealth. So we will have conflict. The question is how to appease conflict, resolve it, without recourse to deadly, violent interaction.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

Photo: svenwerk/Flickr


When we ask the question of whether things are getting better or worse, I think we need to be extremely specific about what things we’re talking about. They’re getting a lot better for some, not better at all for many, and considerably worse, I think, for those who can appreciate the difference and realize that they are not part of that progress.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Photo: United Nations Photo/Flickr

When we ask the question of whether things are getting better or worse, I think we need to be extremely specific about what things we’re talking about. They’re getting a lot better for some, not better at all for many, and considerably worse, I think, for those who can appreciate the difference and realize that they are not part of that progress.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

Photo: United Nations Photo/Flickr

I think we have fallen short, in a sense, by not capitalizing on the contribution and talent of half of the population of the world.

Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

"I think at the root of conflict is our inability to seriously address inequalities, inequalities within states, between people within their own states, inequalities between states, extremely inequitable and unequal distribution of the wealth of the planet…. We have still fallen short, considerably, of addressing that."

—Louise Arbour, Crisis Group’s President and CEO, in an interview with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs

29 May
U.N. Security Council condemns Syria army attack in Houla | The Los Angeles Times
By Patrick J. McDonnell
The U.N. Security Council on Sunday condemned Syrian army artillery and tank barrages on a civilian neighborhood where 108 people, most of them women and children, were killed, suggesting in a carefully worded statement that government forces were largely responsible.As international outrage escalated, some viewed the carnage as a possible turning point in the conflict. The government and opposition groups exchanged blame for the massacre Friday in the township of Houla in western Homs province.The Security Council, meeting in an emergency session, said the “outrageous use of force against [the] civilian population” is a violation of a U.N. peace plan. It called on the government and its opponents to end violence, the U.N. said.The statement was approved after a lengthy discussion withRussia, an ally of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Russia, which holds a veto and has thwarted any U.N.-backed international intervention in Syria, gave its assent to a statement that distanced the Syrian government from the killings of those in Houla who died from shooting at close range or as a result of “severe physical abuse.”The U.N. said a new count indicated that 108 people were killed in Houla, including 49 children and 34 women. How many died from government shelling and how many perished from other causes was not clear.
FULL ARTICLE (The Los Angeles Times)
Photo: Bulent Kilic/ Getty Images

U.N. Security Council condemns Syria army attack in Houla | The Los Angeles Times

By Patrick J. McDonnell

The U.N. Security Council on Sunday condemned Syrian army artillery and tank barrages on a civilian neighborhood where 108 people, most of them women and children, were killed, suggesting in a carefully worded statement that government forces were largely responsible.

As international outrage escalated, some viewed the carnage as a possible turning point in the conflict. The government and opposition groups exchanged blame for the massacre Friday in the township of Houla in western Homs province.

The Security Council, meeting in an emergency session, said the “outrageous use of force against [the] civilian population” is a violation of a U.N. peace plan. It called on the government and its opponents to end violence, the U.N. said.

The statement was approved after a lengthy discussion withRussia, an ally of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Russia, which holds a veto and has thwarted any U.N.-backed international intervention in Syria, gave its assent to a statement that distanced the Syrian government from the killings of those in Houla who died from shooting at close range or as a result of “severe physical abuse.”

The U.N. said a new count indicated that 108 people were killed in Houla, including 49 children and 34 women. How many died from government shelling and how many perished from other causes was not clear.

FULL ARTICLE (The Los Angeles Times)

Photo: Bulent Kilic/ Getty Images