Showing posts tagged as "Claudia Gazzini"

Showing posts tagged Claudia Gazzini

18 Nov
Libyan PM urges militias to leave Tripoli after violence erupts | Borzou Daragahi
Libya’s embattled prime minister Ali Zidane on Saturday called on all armed groups other than the uniformed police and army to leave the capital a day after self-described revolutionary brigades opened fire on mostly unarmed protesters, leaving at least 43 people dead and 400 injured.
Fresh clashes between rival militia groups from the capital, Tripoli, those with roots in Libya’s number three city of Misurata broke out in the city, leaving at least one dead. The Libyan capital appeared close to the brink of a complete breakdown in security amid reports that militias from Misurata had shelled the eastern Tripoli suburb of Tajoura, plundered an army base there and made off with weapons and ammunition.
FULL ARTICLE (Financial Times) 
Photo: Matchbox Media Collective/Flickr

Libyan PM urges militias to leave Tripoli after violence erupts | Borzou Daragahi

Libya’s embattled prime minister Ali Zidane on Saturday called on all armed groups other than the uniformed police and army to leave the capital a day after self-described revolutionary brigades opened fire on mostly unarmed protesters, leaving at least 43 people dead and 400 injured.

Fresh clashes between rival militia groups from the capital, Tripoli, those with roots in Libya’s number three city of Misurata broke out in the city, leaving at least one dead. The Libyan capital appeared close to the brink of a complete breakdown in security amid reports that militias from Misurata had shelled the eastern Tripoli suburb of Tajoura, plundered an army base there and made off with weapons and ammunition.

FULL ARTICLE (Financial Times) 

Photo: Matchbox Media Collective/Flickr

14 May
Deadly car bomb strikes civilian area in eastern Libyan city of Bengahzi | The Associated Press via The Washington Post
By Esam Mohamed and Aya Batrawy
A deadly car bomb exploded Monday near a hospital in a busy area packed with civilians in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi, destroying part of the facility, officials said.
Officials gave conflicting casualty figures, with death tolls ranging from three to 10 in the chaotic aftermath of the attack.
Benghazi, which was the birthplace of the revolution that led to the ouster of dictator Moammar Gadhafi, has suffered a series of assassinations and other attacks, including the Sept. 11 assaults on the U.S. diplomatic mission that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.
The oil-rich North African nation is still largely dominated by militias, many including fighters who battled Gadhafi’s forces during the 2011 civil war, and many attacks are blamed on them as infighting is rampant in the battle for control.
But witnesses and analysts said Monday’s explosion stood out because it struck during the day in a crowded area, putting civilians at risk.
FULL ARTICLE (The Associated Press via The Washington Post)
Photo: Flickr/BBC World Service

Deadly car bomb strikes civilian area in eastern Libyan city of Bengahzi | The Associated Press via The Washington Post

By Esam Mohamed and Aya Batrawy

A deadly car bomb exploded Monday near a hospital in a busy area packed with civilians in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi, destroying part of the facility, officials said.

Officials gave conflicting casualty figures, with death tolls ranging from three to 10 in the chaotic aftermath of the attack.

Benghazi, which was the birthplace of the revolution that led to the ouster of dictator Moammar Gadhafi, has suffered a series of assassinations and other attacks, including the Sept. 11 assaults on the U.S. diplomatic mission that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

The oil-rich North African nation is still largely dominated by militias, many including fighters who battled Gadhafi’s forces during the 2011 civil war, and many attacks are blamed on them as infighting is rampant in the battle for control.

But witnesses and analysts said Monday’s explosion stood out because it struck during the day in a crowded area, putting civilians at risk.

FULL ARTICLE (The Associated Press via The Washington Post)

Photo: Flickr/BBC World Service

17 Apr
"The severe deficiencies of the current judicial system are rooted, first and foremost, in the failings of the one that, in principle, it has replaced."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya

"This has all the hallmarks of a vicious cycle: impatience with the pace of justice and overall mistrust embolden armed groups; their increased activism undermines the state’s ability to function, including on matters of law and order; and this in turn vindicates the armed groups’ claim that it is their duty to fill the vacuum."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya

"Criminal prosecutions against high-ranking Qadhafi-era officials are an important step, but they will not suffice; what is needed is a more comprehensive transitional justice process that, in addition to criminal trials, includes appropriate vetting mechanisms for former regime loyalists and truth commissions."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya

"Unless there is a clear message, there is a real risk of escalating targeted assassinations, urban violence and communal conflicts."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya

"There are many necessary cures to Libya’s pervasive insecurity, but few more urgent than repairing its judicial system."

—from Crisis Group’s recent report, Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya

Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya
Tripoli/Brussels/ Washington  |   17 Apr 2013
Unless Libya breaks the cycle of violence and urgently reforms its justice system, there is a real risk of an increase in assassinations, urban violence and communal conflicts.
Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya, the latest report from the International Crisis Group, analyses the ills plaguing the judicial system in Libya. Well over a year after Qadhafi’s regime was ousted, some armed groups continue to run prisons and enforce their own forms of justice, while others resort to violence to achieve political or criminal aims. All this triggers more grievances, further undermining confidence in the state.
The report’s major findings and recommendations are:
Distrust towards the Libyan judiciary, still considered a Qadhafi-era relic, and disarray within the security forces have led some individuals and groups to take matters in their own hands. They have rounded up thousands of alleged Qadhafi loyalists in total disregard of official procedures and carried out assassinations. This fuels resentment and grievances and risks triggering renewed conflicts.
Since coming to power, Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has declared a zero-tolerance policy towards arbitrary detention and revenge killings and made it a priority to transfer arbitrarily detained people into state custody. This is a welcome change of direction, yet he must tread carefully lest a confrontational approach towards brigades backfire.
Holding members of armed groups accountable for their actions is not enough. The government should work to restore trust in the judiciary. A first tangible step in this direction would involve establishing an independent panel tasked with vetting members of the judiciary found to be corrupt or guilty of unlawful behaviour.
Ultimately, Libya needs a comprehensive transitional justice strategy encompassing criminal trials against high-ranking Qadhafi-era officials, appropriate vetting procedures and truth commissions. The Fact-Finding and Reconciliation Commission and its local branches should begin operating alongside the ordinary criminal justice system, tackling both past and current abuses.
“The severe deficiencies of the current judicial system are rooted, first and foremost, in the failings of the one that, in principle, it has replaced”, says Claudia Gazzini, Crisis Group’s Senior Libya Analyst. “Four decades of arbitrary justice under the Qadhafi regime served as a burdensome backdrop to the new government’s efforts”.
“There are many necessary cures to Libya’s endemic insecurity, but few more urgent than repairing its judicial system”, says Robert Malley, Crisis Group’s Middle East and North Africa Program Director. “There are no quick fixes, but taking immediate measures to restore confidence in the judiciary and enhance its capacity to deal with abuses, both past and present, would be a first significant step forward”.
FULL REPORT

Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya

Tripoli/Brussels/ Washington  |   17 Apr 2013

Unless Libya breaks the cycle of violence and urgently reforms its justice system, there is a real risk of an increase in assassinations, urban violence and communal conflicts.

Trial by Error: Justice in Post-Qadhafi Libya, the latest report from the International Crisis Group, analyses the ills plaguing the judicial system in Libya. Well over a year after Qadhafi’s regime was ousted, some armed groups continue to run prisons and enforce their own forms of justice, while others resort to violence to achieve political or criminal aims. All this triggers more grievances, further undermining confidence in the state.

The report’s major findings and recommendations are:

Distrust towards the Libyan judiciary, still considered a Qadhafi-era relic, and disarray within the security forces have led some individuals and groups to take matters in their own hands. They have rounded up thousands of alleged Qadhafi loyalists in total disregard of official procedures and carried out assassinations. This fuels resentment and grievances and risks triggering renewed conflicts.

Since coming to power, Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has declared a zero-tolerance policy towards arbitrary detention and revenge killings and made it a priority to transfer arbitrarily detained people into state custody. This is a welcome change of direction, yet he must tread carefully lest a confrontational approach towards brigades backfire.

Holding members of armed groups accountable for their actions is not enough. The government should work to restore trust in the judiciary. A first tangible step in this direction would involve establishing an independent panel tasked with vetting members of the judiciary found to be corrupt or guilty of unlawful behaviour.

Ultimately, Libya needs a comprehensive transitional justice strategy encompassing criminal trials against high-ranking Qadhafi-era officials, appropriate vetting procedures and truth commissions. The Fact-Finding and Reconciliation Commission and its local branches should begin operating alongside the ordinary criminal justice system, tackling both past and current abuses.

“The severe deficiencies of the current judicial system are rooted, first and foremost, in the failings of the one that, in principle, it has replaced”, says Claudia Gazzini, Crisis Group’s Senior Libya Analyst. “Four decades of arbitrary justice under the Qadhafi regime served as a burdensome backdrop to the new government’s efforts”.

“There are many necessary cures to Libya’s endemic insecurity, but few more urgent than repairing its judicial system”, says Robert Malley, Crisis Group’s Middle East and North Africa Program Director. “There are no quick fixes, but taking immediate measures to restore confidence in the judiciary and enhance its capacity to deal with abuses, both past and present, would be a first significant step forward”.

FULL REPORT

5 Feb
Libya’s track to security challenged by militias and the Mali nexus | Al Arabiya
By Oussama Romdhani
Despite all street protests against the bloody attack on the U.S. Embassy and the security measures taken by the government after the attack, violence has continued unabated in Benghazi. There has been even another attack on a Western diplomatic target. The failed assassination attempt against Italian consul Guido De Sanctis, on January 12, caused a stir.
“This attack will certainly be a reason of concern for many oil companies who are operating in Libya or planning to return to Libya,” the Tripoli-based analyst for the International Crisis Group, Claudia Gazzini, said. “It can have a negative impact on their decision to stay or return.” 
With Italy being the number one foreign investor in Libya’s hydrocarbon sector, this attack did not obviously help the Libyan government in its efforts to woo back Western companies. Only two days before the assassination attempt, Mohammed Megarief, President of the Libyan National Assembly, was in fact on an investment promotion trip in Rome. In December, Italy’s ENI was the second foreign oil company, after Algeria’s Sonatrach, to announce the resumption of oil exploration in Libya. 
FULL ARTICLE (Al Arabiya)
Photo: Ben Sutherland/Flickr

Libya’s track to security challenged by militias and the Mali nexus | Al Arabiya

By Oussama Romdhani

Despite all street protests against the bloody attack on the U.S. Embassy and the security measures taken by the government after the attack, violence has continued unabated in Benghazi. There has been even another attack on a Western diplomatic target. The failed assassination attempt against Italian consul Guido De Sanctis, on January 12, caused a stir.

“This attack will certainly be a reason of concern for many oil companies who are operating in Libya or planning to return to Libya,” the Tripoli-based analyst for the International Crisis Group, Claudia Gazzini, said. “It can have a negative impact on their decision to stay or return.” 

With Italy being the number one foreign investor in Libya’s hydrocarbon sector, this attack did not obviously help the Libyan government in its efforts to woo back Western companies. Only two days before the assassination attempt, Mohammed Megarief, President of the Libyan National Assembly, was in fact on an investment promotion trip in Rome. In December, Italy’s ENI was the second foreign oil company, after Algeria’s Sonatrach, to announce the resumption of oil exploration in Libya. 

FULL ARTICLE (Al Arabiya)

Photo: Ben Sutherland/Flickr

26 Oct
Capture of Libyan town smacks of revenge, not reconciliation | Reuters
By Marie-Louise Gumuchian and Hadeel Al Shalchi
Hours after taking control of Bani Walid, a former stronghold of Muammar Gaddafi, Libyan militias from the rival city of Misrata fired ferociously at its empty public buildings.
FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)
Photo: A volunteer for the Libyan Red Crescent on his way to Misrata to assist in local hospitals.
Credit: Internews Network/Flickr

Capture of Libyan town smacks of revenge, not reconciliation | Reuters

By Marie-Louise Gumuchian and Hadeel Al Shalchi

Hours after taking control of Bani Walid, a former stronghold of Muammar Gaddafi, Libyan militias from the rival city of Misrata fired ferociously at its empty public buildings.

FULL ARTICLE (Reuters)

Photo: A volunteer for the Libyan Red Crescent on his way to Misrata to assist in local hospitals.

Credit: Internews Network/Flickr