Showing posts tagged as "Abdullahi Boru Halakhe"

Showing posts tagged Abdullahi Boru Halakhe

20 Nov
"It’s slowly getting out of hand…Since Kenya’s intervention in Somalia last October there is a fair amount of profiling of Somalis from the security forces."

Abdullahi Halakhe, a Horn of Africa analyst for the International Crisis Group, on increased ethnic tensions in Kenya after a bus bombing killed nine in the capital on Monday.

FULL ARTICLE (AP via The Times of India)

17 Nov
MRC Chairman Released From Kenya Prison | Voice of America
By Roopa Gogineni
Despite police allegations, Abdullahi Halakhe, the Kenya analyst at the International Crisis Group, does not believe the MRC is militarized. But he said this could change.
"The most pressing issue right now is the capacity of this group to cause violence between now and elections and that they do," said Halakhe. "I am not convinced they actually have the capacity to secede. What I’m more and more worried about is the group’s capacity to cause violence before elections."
FULL ARTICLE (Voice of America)
Photo: Lorena Pajares/Flickr

MRC Chairman Released From Kenya Prison | Voice of America

By Roopa Gogineni

Despite police allegations, Abdullahi Halakhe, the Kenya analyst at the International Crisis Group, does not believe the MRC is militarized. But he said this could change.

"The most pressing issue right now is the capacity of this group to cause violence between now and elections and that they do," said Halakhe. "I am not convinced they actually have the capacity to secede. What I’m more and more worried about is the group’s capacity to cause violence before elections."

FULL ARTICLE (Voice of America)

Photo: Lorena Pajares/Flickr

1 Nov
Briefing: Kenya’s coastal separatists - menace or martyrs? | IRIN
MOMBASA, 24 October 2012 (IRIN) - Kenyan security forces are conducting a wave of arrests of members of the Mombasa Republican Council (MRC), who are accused of incitement and acts of violence. Below, IRIN offers an overview of the coastal secessionist group. 
What is the MRC? 
Formed in the late 1990s, the group aims to counter decades of the perceived marginalization of the coastal region’s indigenous population, which it says successive governments have done nothing to address. 
The MRC remained largely inactive until 2008, when it gained widespread publicity due in large part to a new slogan emblazoned on caps and T-shirts: “Pwani si Kenya”, Swahili for “the coast is not Kenya.” 
Leaders claim a membership of 1.5 million. One independent analyst told IRIN 100,000 was a more plausible figure. 
In addition to calling for secession, the MRC has urged its followers to boycott the general election in March 2013. 
FULL ARTICLE (IRIN)
Photo: DEMOSH/Flickr

Briefing: Kenya’s coastal separatists - menace or martyrs? | IRIN

MOMBASA, 24 October 2012 (IRIN) - Kenyan security forces are conducting a wave of arrests of members of the Mombasa Republican Council (MRC), who are accused of incitement and acts of violence. Below, IRIN offers an overview of the coastal secessionist group. 

What is the MRC? 

Formed in the late 1990s, the group aims to counter decades of the perceived marginalization of the coastal region’s indigenous population, which it says successive governments have done nothing to address. 

The MRC remained largely inactive until 2008, when it gained widespread publicity due in large part to a new slogan emblazoned on caps and T-shirts: “Pwani si Kenya”, Swahili for “the coast is not Kenya.” 

Leaders claim a membership of 1.5 million. One independent analyst told IRIN 100,000 was a more plausible figure. 

In addition to calling for secession, the MRC has urged its followers to boycott the general election in March 2013. 

FULL ARTICLE (IRIN)

Photo: DEMOSH/Flickr

18 Sep
Kenyan Troops Try to Keep Peace in Tana River | Voice of America
By Roopa Gogineni
KILELENGWANI, KENYA — Thousands have fled violence that claimed more than 100 lives in August and September in Kenya’s Tana River District. One-thousand paramilitary troops have been deployed to keep a tenuous peace between the Pokomo and Orma communities.  Today in Kilelengwani, Marabou storks circle the carcasses of cows scattered between the remains of still-smoldering homes.
FULL ARTICLE (Voice of America)
Photo: WOVOC/Flickr

Kenyan Troops Try to Keep Peace in Tana River | Voice of America

By Roopa Gogineni

KILELENGWANI, KENYA — Thousands have fled violence that claimed more than 100 lives in August and September in Kenya’s Tana River District. One-thousand paramilitary troops have been deployed to keep a tenuous peace between the Pokomo and Orma communities.  

Today in Kilelengwani, Marabou storks circle the carcasses of cows scattered between the remains of still-smoldering homes.

FULL ARTICLE (Voice of America)

Photo: WOVOC/Flickr

2 Sep
"The entire coastal region feels extremely disenfranchised by the state… .They feel like they are internally colonized by the Kenyan state. They can go through a list of issues that they feel like the state has done economically and otherwise to marginalize them."

Abdullahi Halakhe, the Kenya analyst with the International Crisis Group

Kenya Tensions Ease Following Riots Over Cleric Assassination" Voice of America, by Roopa Gogineni

31 Aug
Kenya Tensions Ease Following Riots Over Cleric Assassination | Voice of America
By Roopa Gogineni
Security has been restored in the Kenyan city of Mombasa after heavy rioting early this week. On Monday, the assassination of Muslim cleric Aboud Rogo Mohamed triggered the protests, but analysts believe the perceived marginalization of coastal communities underlie the unrest.
FULL ARTICLE (VOA)
Photo: ARC - The Alliance of Religions and Conservation/Flickr

Kenya Tensions Ease Following Riots Over Cleric Assassination | Voice of America

By Roopa Gogineni

Security has been restored in the Kenyan city of Mombasa after heavy rioting early this week. On Monday, the assassination of Muslim cleric Aboud Rogo Mohamed triggered the protests, but analysts believe the perceived marginalization of coastal communities underlie the unrest.

FULL ARTICLE (VOA)

Photo: ARC - The Alliance of Religions and Conservation/Flickr

28 Aug

Remembering Meles Zenawi, Ethiopia’s Champion | NPR

By Ofeibea Quist-Arcton 

Meles Zenawi came to power in Ethiopia at the head of a rebel army that toppled dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam. For 20 years, he worked to alleviate poverty for Ethiopians, but was accused by his critics of human rights abuses and crushing dissent. Meles died this week at 57.

FULL TRANSCRIPT (NPR)

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20 Jan
International Crisis Group

Kenya: Impact of the ICC Proceedings

After post-election violence gripped Kenya in 2007-08, the International Criminal Court (ICC) launched an investigation into top politicians allegedly implicated in the crisis. Crisis Group analyst Abdullahi Boru Halakhe looks at the effect the ICC proceedings may have on this year’s presidential and legislative elections. 7:28

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9 Jan

Kenya: Impact of the ICC Proceedings

Nairobi/Brussels  |   9 Jan 2012

While the International Criminal Court (ICC) has a chance to inaugurate a new era of accountability in Kenya, misperceptions could also amplify ethnic tensions ahead of the 2012 elections if its work and limitations are not better explained to the public.

Kenya : Impact of the ICC Proceedings, the latest briefing from the International Crisis Group, warns that although the mayhem following the disputed December 2007 presidential elections seemed an exception, violence has been a common feature of the country’s politics since the introduction of a multiparty system in 1991. To provide justice to the victims, combat pervasive political impunity and deter future violence, the ICC brought two cases against six suspects who allegedly bore the greatest responsibility. There are fears that if charges are dropped for suspects of one ethnicity and confirmed for those of others, ethnic tensions could increase sharply, regardless of the legal merits.

“The ICC proceedings will have enormous political consequences for both the 2012 elections and the country’s stability”, says Abdullahi Boru Halakhe, Crisis Group’s Horn of Africa Analyst. “Developments in the court will not be viewed by many Kenyans simply as legal decisions, and the timing and framing of proceedings and rulings will inevitably have an impact in heightening or damping down tensions”.

Political jockeying and alliance formation have already begun, in part as a response to the ICC proceedings. The two most prominent suspects, Uhuru Kenyatta (the deputy prime minister, finance minister and son of Kenya’s first president) and William Ruto (the former agriculture and higher education minister), as well as the vice president and many other like-minded politicians, are exploring the possibility of uniting behind one candidate. The ICC is expected to announce in late January whether it has confirmed charges against each of the six suspects. If the court, as is expected, hands down a decision on all charges on the same day, this could be a crucial step to help defuse a rise in ethnic tensions.

But if the ICC process is to contribute to the deterrence of future political violence in Kenya, both the court and its friends must explain its work and limitations better to the public. While still popular, approval of the ICC has been declining, due to deft media manipulation by the suspects and their lawyers. In order to counter misrepresentations of the court’s decisions, the ICC and its supporters, including civil society and other friends, should conduct greater outreach to explain its mandate, workings and process.

Furthermore, Kenya’s government must complement the international process with a national process aimed at countering impunity and punishing ethnic-hate speech and violence. It should direct the deputy public prosecutor to investigate and prosecute in domestic courts other individuals suspected of involvement in the post-election violence. It should also support Willy Mutunga, the new chief justice, in his efforts to reform the judiciary and restore public faith in Kenya’s system.

“To many Kenyans, the ICC’s involvement sends a signal that entrenched impunity for wealthy and powerful politicians will not be permitted to endure”, says EJ Hogendoorn, Crisis Group’s Horn of Africa Project Director. “For a political class used to impunity, this is a likely game changer for how politics are conducted in the country”.

FULL REPORT (PDF)