5 Jul
Middle East Live Update | Guardian
11.32am: Yemen:
The internatonally-backed “transition” plan which resulted in the removal of President Saleh last February has often been touted as a model for the way forward in Syria. However, the latest report from the International Crisis Group highlights a lot of shortcomings.
The nation essentially has witnessed a political game of musical chairs, one elite faction swapping places with the other but remaining at loggerheads …
The settlement failed to resolve the highly personalised conflict between Saleh and his family on the one hand, and General Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar, as well as the powerful al-Ahmar family, on the other …
Likewise, the underlying political economy of corruption has remained virtually untouched. The same families retain control of most of the country’s resources while relying on patronage networks and dominating decision-making in the government, military and political parties.
For frustrated independent activists, the struggle at the top amounts to little more than a political see-saw between two camps that have dominated the country for some 33 years …
The army is still divided, with warring commanders escaping the president’s full authority. Armed factions and tribal groups loyal to Saleh, Ali Mohsen or the al-Ahmars remain in the capital; elsewhere the situation is far worse

MORE LIVE UPDATES (Guardian)
Photo: Al@ce/Flickr

Middle East Live Update | Guardian

11.32am: Yemen:

The internatonally-backed “transition” plan which resulted in the removal of President Saleh last February has often been touted as a model for the way forward in Syria. However, the latest report from the International Crisis Group highlights a lot of shortcomings.

The nation essentially has witnessed a political game of musical chairs, one elite faction swapping places with the other but remaining at loggerheads …

The settlement failed to resolve the highly personalised conflict between Saleh and his family on the one hand, and General Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar, as well as the powerful al-Ahmar family, on the other …

Likewise, the underlying political economy of corruption has remained virtually untouched. The same families retain control of most of the country’s resources while relying on patronage networks and dominating decision-making in the government, military and political parties.

For frustrated independent activists, the struggle at the top amounts to little more than a political see-saw between two camps that have dominated the country for some 33 years …

The army is still divided, with warring commanders escaping the president’s full authority. Armed factions and tribal groups loyal to Saleh, Ali Mohsen or the al-Ahmars remain in the capital; elsewhere the situation is far worse

MORE LIVE UPDATES (Guardian)

Photo: Al@ce/Flickr

Notes

  1. gazetaoriental reblogged this from crisisgroup
  2. anaismijessica reblogged this from crisisgroup
  3. nuuhusnul reblogged this from crisisgroup
  4. chyornii reblogged this from crisisgroup
  5. crisisgroup posted this